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I'm taking an x86 assembly language programming class and know that certain instructions shouldn't be used anymore -- because they're slow on modern processors; for example, the loop instruction.

I haven't been able to find any list of instructions that are considered deprecated and should be avoided; any guidance would be appreciated.

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    Basicly all complex instructions are slower than simple ones. While technically x86 is a CISC, it's faster to use it as RISC. – ruslik Feb 3 '11 at 10:49
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    @ruslik: That's not necessarily true. If you have a complex instruction that performs the same functionality as a set of simple instructions, you're likely to get better performance with the dedicated instruction. It is more likely to be optimized and may even have dedicated hardware that you're missing out on by using only simple instructions. – Nathan Fellman Feb 3 '11 at 13:20
  • @Nathan Fellman, cases like the enter/leave instructions come to mind with regard to this. However, I can't think of any cases where the complex instructions are faster than the simple ones. Can you name a few for me so that I am better informed? – mrduclaw Feb 3 '11 at 17:42
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    You won't find a list as they really aren't ever "deprecated"... Just the ones that you use for a given situation will shift depending on the CPU architecture. Also, some are unavailable in certain circumstances, but they're still not deprecated... – Brian Knoblauch Jun 2 '11 at 19:24
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Your best bet is to consult Intel's official optimization guide.

This an other manuals can be found here.

  • 1
    That's exactly the kind of document that I was looking for! Thank you. – LucidDefender Feb 4 '11 at 18:11
  • See also the x86 tag wiki for links to optimization resources, esp. Agner Fog's excellent guides and insn tables. – Peter Cordes Mar 4 '16 at 4:26
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Oh, but there still might be a good reason to use the loop instruction. For example, loop label only requires two bytes. As opposed to dec cx followed by jnz label requires three bytes. Sometimes code size is more important than speed.

I would suggest, however, that if you're just learning x86 assembly--especially if this is your first foray into assembly language--that you first concentrate on how to do things. Once you've gotten a better feel for how things work, then worry about making them faster.

  • dec cx or dec rcx may require more bytes in 32 or 64-bit mode – phuclv Apr 26 '14 at 4:25
  • For asm beginners, minimizing number of instructions, and esp. number of branches, is a reasonable approximation for efficiency. I often see beginner questions with a huge amount of branching (e.g. compare and branch, then unconditional branch to somewhere else, or even jmp label / label: to jump over a blank line between blocks...). I guess thinking about branches as fall-through-or-not takes practice. It's very true that trying to write code that avoids pitfalls on a range of AMD and Intel CPUs is hard. But see agner.org/optimize for insn tables and uarch writeups. – Peter Cordes Mar 4 '16 at 4:24
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All CPU instructions are 100% functional to reach compatibility with older CPUs. So why to avoid some instruction? There is no realy deprecated x86 instructions! But we can say:

1)All string istructions like rep movsb are slower.

2) xlat is slow and very rare in use.

3)Also the use of stack frame functions ENTER and LEAVE is slow.

4)Uder Windows (XP, vista...) the deprecated instructions are IN and OUT, but only under CPU ring 2 (aplication level), also the int nn is deprecated, except int3 (debugger trap).

EDIT: added simple speed test to check strings instruction rep cmp on different versions of CPUs.

Test is made under Delphi IDE but the asm part is very easy to translate in any other IDE.

program ProjectTest;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

uses SysUtils, windows;

const
  ArraySize = 50000;

var
  StartTicks    :int64;
  EndTicks      :int64;
  arA           :array [0..ArraySize - 1]of byte;
  arB           :array [0..ArraySize - 1]of byte;

begin
  FillChar(ArA, SizeOf(ArA), 255);          //Set all bytes to 0xFF
  FillChar(ArB, SizeOf(ArB), 255);          //Set all bytes to 0xFF

repeat
  Sleep(100);       //Calm down
  asm
//Save  StartTicks
    rdtsc
    mov         dword ptr [StartTicks], eax
    mov         dword ptr [StartTicks + 4], edx
//Test LOOP
    push        edi
    mov         ecx, -ArraySize
    mov         edi, offset arA + ArraySize
    mov         esi, offset arB + ArraySize
@loop:
    mov         al,[esi + ecx]
    cmp         [edi + ecx], al
    jnz         @exit
    inc         ecx
    jnz         @loop
@exit:
    pop         edi
//Save  EndTicks
    rdtsc
    mov         dword ptr [EndTicks], eax
    mov         dword ptr [EndTicks + 4], edx
  end;

  WriteLn('Loop ticks : ' + IntToStr(EndTicks - StartTicks));

  Sleep(100);       //Calm down
  asm
//Save  StartTicks
    rdtsc
    mov         dword ptr [StartTicks], eax
    mov         dword ptr [StartTicks + 4], edx
//Test REP
    push        edi
    cld
    mov         ecx, ArraySize
    mov         edi, offset arA
    mov         esi, offset arB
    repe        cmpsb
    pop         edi
//Save  EndTicks
    rdtsc
    mov         dword ptr [EndTicks], eax
    mov         dword ptr [EndTicks + 4], edx
  end;

  WriteLn('Rep ticks  : ' + IntToStr(EndTicks - StartTicks));

  ReadLn                    //Wait keyboard
until false;

end.

TESTs for ArraySize = 50000

Average results...

1)My Intel single core CPU Pentium 4 results: Loop ticks : 232000; Rep ticks : 233000

2)My Intel Core 2 Quad CPU results: Loop ticks : 158000; Rep ticks : 375000

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    These details are very CPU-dependent, to say the least. What you write is very true for some CPUs, and very untrue for others. – Nathan Fellman Feb 3 '11 at 13:18
  • Agree... This details are valid for newer Intel CPUs with build in Hyper-threading technology. – GJ. Feb 3 '11 at 14:00
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    @GJ, you mention that "all string istructions" [sic] are slower. Slower than what? Also, are you sure that all the int nn style instructions are deprecated besides int 3? How about int 1, the single-step interrupt? – mrduclaw Feb 3 '11 at 17:45
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    rep stos / rep movs are fast on Intel CPUs. For memset/memcpy of more than ~128B, they can beat any SSE or AVX loop when used with aligned inputs. This is especially true for IvyBridge and later, with the ERMSB feature (which makes rep stosb the best choice, rather than rep stosq and then cleanup). repe / repne compare / search instructions are not particularly fast, and you can beat the pants off them with a good SSE pcmpeqb loop. – Peter Cordes Mar 4 '16 at 4:38
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    The Intel optimization manual has a chapter on memset/memcpy, with graphs of their optimized SSE implementation (from their high-performance library) vs. rep movs, for various sizes and alignments. Don't lump rep movs together with repe cmps. rep movs can use stores that avoid read-for-ownership overhead on cache misses, but without evicting the written data from cache. (With SSE, you have to choose regular stores (worse for large buffers) vs. movnt stores (much worse for small buffers since it evicts written lines from cache).) – Peter Cordes Mar 4 '16 at 4:39
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If you what to know what to avoid, go directly to the processor manufacturers, both intel and amd have manuals for the instruction sets their processors support and to what degree they support them, your best bet if probably the optimization volumes, but if your only just starting out, take Jim's advice, get the thing working first before you worry about speed

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