2

I've created a simple pre-commit script for git:

#!/bin/sh

if git rev-parse —verify HEAD >/dev/null 2>&1; then
    against=HEAD
else
    against=4b825dc642cb6eb9a060e54bf8d69288fbee4904
fi

for FILE in `git diff --cached --name-only` ; do
    # Check if the file contains 'DbMigration'
    echo $FILE $against
    if [ -n "grep -E ':\s*DbMigration\s' $FILE" ];
    then
        echo ''
        echo ''
        echo '[**CODEPOLICE**]'
        echo '[**CODEPOLICE**]' $FILE
        echo '[**CODEPOLICE**]'
        echo '[**CODEPOLICE**] This file contains a direct subclass of DbContext! Refactor your migrations to use <...> instead!'
        echo '[**CODEPOLICE**]'
        echo ''
        echo ''
        exit 1
    fi
done

exit

The check if [ -n "grep -E ':\s*DbMigration\s' $FILE" ] fails miserably in the sense that it generates false positives.

Versions involved are:

Windows 10 Enterprise

$ git --version
git version 2.15.1.windows.2

$ bash --version
GNU bash, version 4.4.12(1)-release (x86_64-pc-msys)

What gives?

Update

Some examples:

 public partial class Initial : DbMigration --> we want positive & we get positive --> ok

 public partial class Initial : FoobarDbMigration --> we want negative & we get positive --> not ok

 public partial class Initial : Foobar --> we want negative & we get positive --> not ok

 public partial class Initial : DbMigrationFoobar --> we want negative & we get positive --> also not ok
  • Can you add a "positive" example and a "false positive" as well? – Stefan M Feb 15 '18 at 14:00
  • Thank you so much for tuning in. I will update the question per your request in a few moments. – XDS Feb 15 '18 at 14:21
1

You have to start a subshell to execute the command.

To test for an empty string, you have to do it like this:

[ -n "$(grep -E ':\s*DbMigration\s' $FILE)" ]

This yields correct with all the given test cases you provided.

1

The test

[ -n "grep -E ':\s*DbMigration\s' $FILE" ]

doesn't run the command, it tests if the string inside "" is not empty. And it is not empty so the test always succeed!

To run the command and test its output use backticks instead of double quotes:

[ -n "`grep -E ':\s*DbMigration\s' $FILE`" ]

or use $():

[ -n "$(grep -E ':\s*DbMigration\s' $FILE)" ]
  • Although this is a problem with the code, it does NOT give the correct result. grep -E ':\s*DbMigration\s' $FILE | wc will give 1 0 1 and the test for -n will still succeed. – Stefan M Feb 15 '18 at 14:32
  • Use grep -Eq to just get the return code. – jthill Feb 15 '18 at 15:05
  • @StefanM I don't know why do you talk about wc. And you probably need * at the end of re: grep -Eq ':\s*DbMigration\s* (looking at your examples). – phd Feb 15 '18 at 15:46
0

The bash script that seems to fit the bill turned out to be this one:

#!/bin/sh

RED='\033[0;31m'
NC='\033[0m' # No Color

echo ""
echo -n "[**CODEPOLICE**] Checking for usages of 'DbMigration' over 'VNextDbMigration' ... "

stagedFiles=`git diff --cached --name-only`
while read -r FILE ; do
    # Check if the file contains ': DbMigration'

    if [ -f "$FILE" ];
    then
        matchingLines=$( grep -P ":(\s|\r|\n)*DbMigration(\s|$)" "$FILE" )
        if [ "$matchingLines" != "" ];
        then
            echo -e ""
            echo -e "${RED}[**CODEPOLICE**]${NC}"
            echo -e "${RED}[**CODEPOLICE**]${NC}" $FILE
            echo -e "${RED}[**CODEPOLICE**]${NC}"
            echo -e "${RED}[**CODEPOLICE**]${NC} ^- This file contains a direct subclass of 'DbContext'! Refactor your migration to have it inherit from 'VNextDbMigration' instead!"
            echo -e "${RED}[**CODEPOLICE**]${NC}"
            echo -e ""
            echo -e ""
            exit 1
        fi
    fi
done <<< $stagedFiles

echo "ALL OK"
echo ""

exit

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