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I am trying to understand multi-threading in Java, using the features which were added as part of java.util.concurrent.* . To begin with, there is concept of lock which a thread can try to acquire; if a thread can't acquire, it can do some other tasks.

This I have read in online materials as well in some books, but never ever seen anything they have implemented in real. How is this possible that if a thread can't acquire a lock it can execute other tasks; isn't a thread supposed to do a single "piece of work"? How can it have multiple logic execution based on if it can/can't acquire a lock?

Is there any real implementation which I can refer to see to understand, to reinforce the concepts; else it seems too abstract, how to implement in real life.

Any explanations?

closed as too broad by user177800, Makyen, robinCTS, Machavity, Paul Roub Feb 18 '18 at 19:05

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    While it may be possible to implement a thread like this, in practice it doesn't really happen. Ordinarily when a thread can't acquire a lock it will just wait (do nothing) until it can. – Michael Feb 15 '18 at 18:27
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    As for how this can be possible, it's no different from using standard conditional logic (i.e. if statements) – Michael Feb 15 '18 at 18:28
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    If you search on SO for tryLock() you can find real life examples. – Kayaman Feb 15 '18 at 18:30
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    @CuriousMind not that I can remember. I can picture what it would look like but I'm struggling to think of a valid use case. If you have two distinct tasks that share a thread, one which requires a lock and one that doesn't, I can't see any advantage over using a thread for each task. The non-locking task would also have to be okay with potentially never getting executed which would be unusual as well. – Michael Feb 15 '18 at 18:33
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It's difficult to find real life examples because normally you wouldn't design your software to use tryLock(). The example given in the javadoc is as follows:

Lock lock = ...;
if (lock.tryLock()) {
  try {
    // manipulate protected state
  } finally {
    lock.unlock();
  }
} else {
  // perform alternative actions
}

But you wouldn't design your software like that, would you? What if the lock is never (or almost never) available, how will that affect your program? What if it's always available? You have a method that does one of two things depending on pure chance. That's not good design, it increases randomness and complexity.

Okay, so it's not something you decide to use because it's elegant. What is it good for?

Imagine you've inherited a legacy project designed by an insane programmer and it has severe issues with deadlocks. It has synchronized methods peppered all around and needs to be booted at least once every week because it locks up. First you convert all the synchronized methods to use Lock instead. Now you no longer block forever on synchronized, but can use tryLock(long, TimeUnit) to timeout and prevent deadlocks.

Now you've solved the reboot causing deadlocks, but it's still not optimal since you're spending time waiting. With additional refactoring you manage to reduce the locks, but unfortunately you can't do proper lock ordering just yet. Your end code looks like this, where inner locks are acquired with tryLock() or outerlock is released to prevent deadlock:

Lock outerLock = ...;
outerLock.lock();  // Here we block freely
try {
   Lock innerLock = ...;
   if (innerLock.tryLock()) {  // Here we risk deadlock, we'd rather "fail-fast"
     try {
       doSomethingProtectedByLocks();
     } finally {
       innerLock.unlock();
     }
   } else {
     throw new OperationFailedException(); // Signal the calling code to retry
   }   
} finally {
   outerLock.unlock();
}

I think the problem is mainly with wording. The Javadoc talks about "actions" (like unlocking an outer lock) being performed based on whether the lock was acquired or not, but it's easy to read it as if the thread would have 2 separate responsibilities determined by the lock state.

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    Well it was the least convoluted situation I could think of. You don't always have enough pull to say "let's rewrite the whole thing", so the conversion from synchronized to Lock to get access to additional functionality is a valid tool in refactoring. – Kayaman Feb 15 '18 at 20:56

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