10

Short version:
If I wanted to write, ideally, a bug free program, that could safely and possibly efficiently perform operations on UTF-8/16/32 encodings, what rules should I stick to?
Things, I especially want to know are listed below the long version.

Long version:
During my amateur career I've learned a lot of C++ but to this day I didn't try to fully understand character encoding and locales. I can imagine that like a memory management has its rules, that make your program safe, free from leaks and unpredictable behaviour, so has them the character encoding. Inb4: I've done research about this topic, been browsing cppreference and learned a lot of new classes, functions and libraries but without good enough explaination I can't really, fully understand it. Also, I couldn't find any good and not obsolete <locale> know-how. So, moving forward - if I had to write multilingual application using the standard library strings:

  • Which string container should I pick?
    • std::string with UTF-8?
    • std::wstring (don't really know much about it)
    • std::u16string with UTF-16?
    • std::u32string with UTF-32?
  • Should I stick entirely to one of the above containers or change them when needed?
  • Can I use non-english characters in string literals, when using UTF strings, such as Polish characters: ąćęłńśźż etc?
  • What changes when we store UTF-8 encoded characters in std::string? Are they limited to one-byte ASCII characters or can they be multi-byte?
    What happens when i do the following?

    std::string s = u8"foo";
    s += 'x';
    
  • What are differences between wchar_t and other multi-byte character types? Is wchar_t character or wchar_t string literal capable of storing UTF encodings?

According to title, I am asking about the latest features of C++ language - from C++17, C++14 and C++11 standards.

Edit:
As few people pointed out, some of the above questions are a really huge topics and are worth a separate questions. TODO: add links to the questions.

  • 1
    It's an interesting topic though - where should it go instead? – CookiePLMonster Feb 15 '18 at 21:50
  • 2
    @razzorflame I suggest breaking it down into multiple questions. After doing the proper online research, that is. – Ron Feb 15 '18 at 21:51
  • 2
    This was a useful resource for me when dealing with Unicode in C++: utf8everywhere.org – Ardavel Feb 15 '18 at 21:59
  • 2
    Take a few secs to think about left-to-right vs right-to-left; what exactly is a space ( blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/oldnewthing/20180214-00/?p=98016 ); what sort of text processing are you going to do? The storage problem (any of the UTFs) is not the end of the issue just the beginning. eg your toupper / tolower does not make sense for some languages which will not round-trip (eg German) or even have a conversion. – Richard Critten Feb 15 '18 at 22:00
  • 1
    There's no usable Unicode support in the C++ standard. The problem is solved with third party libraries and frameworks. – n. 'pronouns' m. Feb 15 '18 at 22:30
10

Which string container should I pick?

That is really up to you to decide, based on your own particular needs. Any of the choices you have presented will work, and they each have their own advantages and disadvantages. Generically, UTF-8 is good to use for storage and communication purposes, and is backwards compatible with ASCII. Whereas UTF-16/32 is easier to use when processing Unicode data.

std::wstring (don't really know much about it)

The size of wchar_t is compiler-dependent and even platform-dependent. For instance, on Windows, wchar_t is 2 bytes, making std::wstring usable for UTF-16 encoded strings. On other platforms, wchar_t may be 4 bytes instead, making std::wstring usable for UTF-32 encoded strings instead. That is why wchar_t/std::wstring is generally not used in portable code, and why char16_t/std::u16string and char32_t/std::u32string were introduced in C++11.

Should I stick entirely to one of the above containers or change them when needed?

Use whatever containers suit your needs.

Typically, you should use one string type throughout your code. Perform data conversions only at the boundaries where string data enters/leaves your program. For instance, when reading/writing files, network communications, platform system calls, etc.

How to properly convert between them?

There are many ways to handle that.

C++11 and later have std::wstring_convert/std::wbuffer_convert.

There are 3rd party Unicode conversion libraries, such as ICONV, ICU, etc.

There are C library functions, platform system calls, etc.

Can I use non-english characters in string literals, when using UTF strings, such as Polish characters: ąćęłńśźż etc?

Yes, if you use appropriate string literal prefixes:

u8 for UTF-8

L for UTF-16 or UTF-32 (depending on compiler/platform)

u16 for UTF-16

u32 for UTF-32

What changes when we store UTF-8 encoded characters in std::string? Are they limited to one-byte ASCII characters or can they be multi-byte?

They can be multi-byte. Just as std::wstring (when wchar_t is 2 bytes) and std::u16string can hold strings containing supplementary characters outside of the BMP, which require UTF-16 surrogates to encode.

When a string container contains a UTF encoded string, each "character" is just a UTF encoded codeunit. UTF-8 encodes a Unicode codepoint as 1-4 codeunits (1-4 chars in a std::string). UTF-16 encodes a codepoint as 1-2 codeunits (1-2 wchar_ts/char16_ts in a std::wstring/std::u16string). UTF-32 encodes a codepoint as 1 codeunit (1 char32_t in a std::u32string).

What happens when i do the following?

std::string s = u8"foo";
s += 'x';

Exactly what you would expect. A std::string holds char elements. Regardless of encoding, operator+=(char) will simply append a single char to the end of the std::string.

How can I distinguish UTF char[] and non-UTF char[] or std::string?

You would have to perform your own heuristic analysis of the char[]/std::string data to see if it conforms to a UTF or not.

What are differences between wchar_t and other multi-byte character types?

Byte size and UTF encoding.

char = ANSI/MBCS or UTF-8

wchar_t = UTF-16 or UTF-32, depending on compiler/platform

char16_t = UTF-16

char32_t = UTF-32

Is wchar_t character or wchar_t string literal capable of storing UTF encodings?

Yes, UTF-16 or UTF-32, depending on compiler/platform. In case of UTF-16, a single wchar_t can only hold a codepoint value that is in the BMP. A single wchar_t in UTF-32 can hold any codepoint value. A wchar_t string can encode all codepoints in either encoding.

How to properly manipulate UTF strings (such as toupper/tolower conversion) and be compatible with locales simultaneously?

That is a very broad topic, worthy of its own separate question by itself.

  • Thank you for shedding light on this topic. I understand now how huge this topic really is. I need to ask one or two more extensive questions about that, but as you said, it is worth a separate question. – Poeta Kodu Feb 15 '18 at 22:48
  • Nice write up. Minor point: You always could use so-called non-English characters in string literals. The compiler encodes them to the specific "execution charset" (encoding) as directed, with some compilers defaulting to UTF-8. This the case for 'x' in the question. – Tom Blodget Feb 16 '18 at 0:23

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