4

As a beginner with C++ I was learning about linked list and other data structures. After looking at a few implementations online I found these two ways they defined struct. What is the difference between the two. In one we add "struct" before the next pointer, and in one we don't.

Way 1:

struct node
{
   int data;
   node *next;
};

Way 2:

struct node
{
   int data;
   struct node *next;
};
  • i might be wrong on this but it's only legacy stuff, no difference – Raxvan Feb 16 '18 at 16:33
  • 5
    the second is a C-way – sim Feb 16 '18 at 16:34
9
struct node *next;

Is only necessary in C code. In C, doing:

node *next;

Is not allowed. However, in C++, you can use both methods. There is no difference between them in this case.

The only time you would need the struct keyword in C++ for a declaration would be if there is some sort of ambiguity or if the struct has not been defined yet. (An example for the first would the stat function, which is a function and a struct on POSIX systems).

  • About the last paragraph, you are forgetting the most common scenario in my experience, i.e. providing an incomplete definition straight inside a parameter or field declaration. As in void foo(struct Bar *bar);, where Bar is not actually defined in the header where this declaration is provided. Edit: I see now that this is 2 years old and my use case was already provided in the next answer. Oh well. – Matteo Italia Feb 21 '18 at 7:28
  • @MatteoItalia I have edited that in, and this question is only 5 days old... – Arnav Borborah Feb 21 '18 at 11:30
  • Ok, I was clearly not completely awake :-) I mistook the "Feb 16" for "Feb 2016". – Matteo Italia Feb 21 '18 at 11:31
8

What is the difference between the two.

The difference is that the latter (called elaborated type specifier) declares that node is a struct.

In this case, it is redundant to declare that node is a struct, because that has already been declared:

struct node
^^^^^^^^^^^ <-- node is a struct
{
   int data;
   node *next;
};

An example of a case where there is a difference:

struct a {
    //b* pointer;      // oops, we don't know what b is
    struct b* pointer; // OK, b is a struct
};

struct b{};

It is typically not absolutely necessary to use an elaborated type specifier, as it is possible to use a separate declaration instead:

struct b;

struct a {
    b* pointer;
};

struct b{};

Choice between them is personal preference.


I say typically because sometimes you need it to disambiguate a variable of same name from a type:

int foo;
struct foo{};

int main()
{
    foo = 10;            // refers to int
    struct foo instance; // refers to the struct
}

It is usually a bad design to use same name for multiple things, so this is not very typical.


Finally, it is sometimes desirable to write header files that can be included in both C and C++. Such header must use the common subset of both languages.

In C, node is not a type name, but a tag for a structure. It is necessary in C to refer to a struct tag using struct keyword.

3

The second version is required in C, but bad style in C++, and there are almost no situations in C++ in which you actually have to add the keyword like this.

Note that you don't have to write your own linked-list implementations in C++, unless it's for academic learning purposes. Use std::list or std::forward_list.

1

In your case there is no difference at all. However, consider this example:

struct foo { struct node* f; };   // <- this is fine
struct foo_broken { node* f; };   // <- wont compile

struct node { };

int main() {
    foo f;
    //foo_broken g;
}

Placing the keyword struct allows you to declare the member before you declare node. Without struct the compiler will issue an error (for foo_broken):

error: ‘node’ does not name a type

That is, placing the keyword struct acts like a forward declaration. To use foo you need to supply a declaration of node but it can come after the declaration of foo.

1

This is because C++ grew out of C and C's syntax, and the language kept both types of syntax even though the explicit use of struct to declare the type of a variable was no longer needed. There are some cases, i.e., to resolve ambiguity between different types/functions/etc. with the same name, where it would make a difference. Also by keeping this syntax valid in C++, it would help people port C code over to C++ without introducing an error.

In C, by default you had to always place the struct keyword in front of the name of the struct. So only Way #2 was valid C:

struct node
{
    int data;
    node *next; //error in C!
};

struct node
{
    int data;
    struct node *next; //compiles
};

But you would often see in C code that struct declarations were paired typedefs in order to create new types, such as:

typedef struct node_t
{
    int data;
    struct node *next;
} node;

And this would allow node to be used as a type without struct in front of it. In C++, it effectively automated this typedef for all struct and class types in the code, which is why you can use the struct or class name without the appropriate qualifier before it.

0

There is no difference between the two declarations in C++

  • 1
    Other answers and comments explain how in certain rare situations, there may be a difference. – Christian Hackl Feb 16 '18 at 16:41

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