-1

I am trying to use a nested struct to represent some data that I am going to write to a file, but when I try to assign the value of the third data member and on, the value does not get assigned. Example:

typedef struct {
    short numFields;
    char *datasetID;
    double month;
    double day;
} TestHeader;

typedef struct {

    TestHeader header;

} TestFile;

int main()
{

    TestFile* lre = malloc(sizeof(TestFile));

    lre->header.numFields = 2;
    lre->header.datasetID = "BLAHBLAH";
    lre->header.month = 5.0;
    lre->header.day = 6.0;

    printf("%d, %s, %d, %d\n", lre->header.numFields, lre->header.datasetID, lre->header.month, lre->header.day);
}

Output is:

2, BLAHBLAH, 0, 0

Why?

  • 1
    Because you print double with %d. – Eugene Sh. Feb 16 '18 at 17:49
  • char* does not allocate any storage. Your code only (partly) works for the string because you assigned it to a string constant. Which should have given you a warning since that is const. If you want an element that manages its own storage use std::string – Dave S Feb 16 '18 at 17:52
  • @DaveS In c there is no warning, unlike c++. In fact, a string literal is not const, it's read only. C++ enforces their constness to prevent modifying it but you always have const_cast<> which will anyway allow you to do it. – Iharob Al Asimi Feb 16 '18 at 17:53
  • @IharobAlAsimi ah, right, I use C++ at work. The access violations if you modify it will be a pleasant surprise! – Dave S Feb 16 '18 at 17:55
  • If you had used your debugger, you would have found out the the assignment worked fine. – Martin James Feb 16 '18 at 18:43
3

Because you have used the wrong printf() specifier, try

printf("%d, %s, %f, %f\n",
    lre->header.numFields, 
    lre->header.datasetID, 
    lre->header.month, 
    lre->header.day
);

Also, be careful with the assignment of a string literal to a char pointer like that, string literals are read only and the pointer to it doesn't reflect that, so you could accidentally try and modify it causing undefined behavior.

| improve this answer | |
  • I don't plan on ever changing it. How do you suggest that I store that? char[]? – Jared Feb 16 '18 at 17:56
  • @Jared const char * – machine_1 Feb 16 '18 at 17:58
  • What do you mean? It depends. Your data structures should reflect what they are for explicitly. So you need to think about that. Do you mean that you wont make it const? Then you have to strdup() it and be careful to free() the pointer later. If their nature is const, i.e. they will not change in the course of the program's execution, just make it const. Note that const is a qualifier and it doesn't imply anything major other than the compiler warning you that you shall not modify that. – Iharob Al Asimi Feb 16 '18 at 17:58
  • Sorry I mean the value will never change. Sounds like const char * is the way to go. Thanks for the help – Jared Feb 16 '18 at 18:04
2

First, you must include the relevant header files as you use two standard library functions, namely malloc() and printf().

Second, you must use the correct format specifiers for the corresponding arguments of the function printf(); %hd for short, and %f for double.

And lastly, don't forget to free dynamically allocated memory:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef struct {
    short numFields;
    char *datasetID;
    double month;
    double day;
} TestHeader;

typedef struct {
    TestHeader header;
} TestFile;

int main()
{
    TestFile* lre = malloc(sizeof(TestFile));

    lre->header.numFields = 2;
    lre->header.datasetID = "BLAHBLAH";
    lre->header.month = 5.0;
    lre->header.day = 6.0;

    printf("%hd, %s, %f, %f\n", lre->header.numFields, lre->header.datasetID, lre->header.month, lre->header.day);

    free(lre);
}
| improve this answer | |

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.