8

More specifically, greater-than-or-equal-to operations.

Logically n >= k should be equal to n > k || n == k but that doesn't seem to be the case.

Why is it that this:

var d1 = new Date(2018, 1, 16);
var d2 = new Date(2018, 1, 16);
console.log(d1 > d2);
console.log(d1 < d2);
console.log(d1 == d2);
console.log(d1 >= d2);
console.log(d1 <= d2);

produces false, false, false, true, true ?

  • For what it's worth, I originally thought this may be a browser specific oddity, but this behavior is replicated on every browser I tried. – Strikegently Feb 16 '18 at 19:35
  • 1
    Big mistake here, you missed the fact that d1 and d2 are Date objects, not integers ! – Pierre Feb 16 '18 at 19:38
  • 1
    In JavaScript, a >= b is not a > b || a == b because there are multiple types of equality in place. – Derek 朕會功夫 Feb 16 '18 at 19:40
8
 console.log(d1 > d2);
 console.log(d1 < d2);

These convert them to numbers first, then compare them. As they are at the same time, they got the same number so one is not bigger or smaller than the other.

 console.log(d1 == d2);

This checks if the date references are the same. But they are not as they are two different objects.

 console.log(d1 >= d2);
 console.log(d1 <= d2);

These compare them by numbers, but also for equality. If you do:

 console.log(+d1 === +d2);

you see that they are equal by the number they represent.

Reference: == <=


TLDR: use === and manually convert types to prevent such odd behaviour...

  • JavaScript never ceases to amaze me... Which is not always a good thing for a programming language! – Strikegently Feb 16 '18 at 19:54
  • @strikegently well ... thats why i love it. JS is the home for nearly everyone. From newbies to professionals, from imperative programmers to functional ones, even code golfing is possible... – Jonas Wilms Feb 16 '18 at 19:56

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