10

In doing a little testing (Chrome on macOS) of the Array.prototype.fill() method, its clearly almost twice as slow (if not slower) than simply creating your own for loop and filling your array.

Clearly doing something like:

for( var i = 0; i < Array.length; i++) {
   A[i] = 0;
}

vs

Array.fill(0);

The Array.fill() method would take ~210-250ms to fill an array of size 10000000, while the for loop would take ~70-90ms. It just seems that the Array.fill() method could be re-written to simply use a straight forward loop since you'd always know your initial index and target index.

let arrayTest = new Array(10000000),
    startTime,
    endTime;

startTime = performance.now();
arrayTest.fill(0);
endTime = performance.now();

console.log("%sms", endTime - startTime);
arrayTest = new Array(10000000);
startTime = performance.now();
for (let i = 0; i < arrayTest.length; i++){
  arrayTest[i] = 0;
}
endTime = performance.now();

console.log("%sms", endTime - startTime);

The above actually shows an even greater discrepancy compared to when I tested locally.

Edit: I realize now after further testing that the discrepancies are diminished a lot when switching over to Firefox and its really engine dependent. I am guessing this is mainly a result of how different JavaScript engines are optimizing loops vs a method. It still seems as though a loop within the Array.prototype.fill() could be optimized to resolve this difference though.

15
  • 3
    Show us how you're testing this. Commented Feb 17, 2018 at 0:35
  • 1
    How were you testing this? How did you measure how long it took? What browser did you use? Are you using any polyfills?
    – Dai
    Commented Feb 17, 2018 at 0:35
  • 1
    I'd say this is more likley to vary from browser to browser Commented Feb 17, 2018 at 0:35
  • Array.length does not do what you think it does - unless you somehow created an array instance variable named Array that clashes with the Array constructor function - that might cause issues right there.
    – Dai
    Commented Feb 17, 2018 at 0:40
  • 1
    Date is not accurate.... look into developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/Performance/now. One pass is not going to tell you anything and better yet, look at jsperf Commented Feb 17, 2018 at 0:45

4 Answers 4

5

The result is consistent with reports that parts of Chrome are written in JavaScript, and rely on run time profiling and optimization to improve performance.

I packaged the test code in a function to be called repeatedly from a test page which can be loaded into different browsers (this is not a runnable snippet):

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html><head><meta charset="utf-8">
<title>Array.prototype.fill</title>
<script>

Array.prototype.customFill = function( value, start = 0, end = this.length) {
    var count = end-start;
    if( count > 0 && count === Math.floor(count)){
        while( count--)
            this[start++]=value;
    }
    return this;
}

function test() {  
    let arrayTest,
        startTime,
        endTime,
        arraySize = 1000000;

    arrayTest = new Array(arraySize);
    startTime = performance.now();
    for (let i = 0; i < arrayTest.length; i++){
      arrayTest[i] = 0;
    }
    endTime = performance.now();
    console.log("%sms (loop)", endTime - startTime);

    arrayTest = new Array(arraySize);
    startTime = performance.now();
    arrayTest.fill(0);
    endTime = performance.now();
    console.log("%sms (fill)", endTime - startTime);

    arrayTest = new Array(arraySize);
    startTime = performance.now();
    arrayTest.customFill(0);
    endTime = performance.now();
    console.log("%sms (custom fill)", endTime - startTime);   
}
</script>
</head>
<body>
    open the console and click <button type="button" onclick="test()">test</button>
</body>
</html>

The array size can be adjusted to suit the performance of the device used.

The results for Chrome under Windows showed a large performance win for the loop, for the first two test clicks on test. On the second click, timing for the loop seemed to improve. On the third click both loop and fill methods appeared to be optimized and ran with nearly equal, and improved, speed. Results were repeatable after reloading the page.

I find this consistent with Chrome script optimization strategies and inconsistent with Chrome's Array.prototype.fill being written in C++ or similar. Although Array.prototype.fill.toString() reports the function body as "native code" is doesn't say what language it is written in.


Update

Added timings for a custom fill method, written for speed, and stored as Array.prototype.customFill.

Timings for Firefox are consistent with Array.prototype.fill being written in script. The native implementation outperformed the loop and was generally (but not always) faster than the custom fill method.

Timings for Chrome show are also consistent with Array.prototype.fill being written in some kind of script that becomes optimized. All three fill methods tested shown an increase in speed after one or two test clicks.

However, the custom fill method starts out over ten times faster than Chromes native version. You would need to put nonsense code in the custom method to slow it down enough to approach the native method's initial speed. Conversely, after optimization, the native method is around twice as fast - the custom method written in JavaScript never gets optimized to the same extent.

While Chromes Array.prototype.fill method could be written in JavaScript, additional explanation seems to be needed to account for the initial slowness and final performance optimizations noted.

5
  • So I tinkered with your example here in several different browsers (Chrome, Firefox, and Safari). The results were fairly interesting, although I adjusted your example to be initializing the array before each test, for consistency. The results are fairly interesting. Safari had the loop take way longer than the fill() method for individual clicks. Firefox consistently had the fill() slightly edge out loop. Chrome definitely optimized by the third call and performance was nearly the same for both. Commented Feb 21, 2018 at 22:17
  • Good point about initializing the array each time. For interest I've updated the answer with timings for a custom fill method. Comparison of timings in Chrome shows there is still a lot of explaining to do :-(
    – traktor
    Commented Feb 22, 2018 at 2:38
  • I'm inclined to believe this is more due to V8's JIT marking the method as a hot object and then using that optimized version of it by the 3rd call. It would make sense and sort of explain the initial performance being so bad. It would still be nice if the fill() method were just faster initially anyways, since it seems bad that custom written code performance better than a native method to accomplish the same thing. Commented Feb 22, 2018 at 23:00
  • if this is about JIT, then why would the performance of fill() improve on third or more run? it's only called 3 times which seems not "hot" enough.
    – Sajuuk
    Commented Aug 1, 2019 at 3:09
  • @Sajuuk - conjecture on whether the unoptimized method is written in Java, C#, Python, JavaScript or something else is just that - conjecture. I suspect it's not JavaScript based on timings alone.
    – traktor
    Commented Aug 1, 2019 at 13:00
3

This JSPerf confirms that fill is slower than a for loop.

0

When array size is 1e5, fill always wins. When array size is 1e7, for wins

0

Edit (Jan 12, 2024):

As commented by @chester-fung, the above test cases are not configured properly. So below are the corrected test cases - which results in for loop almost always being better.


I've tested this in jsbench.me & jsperf.app - since jsperf.com isn't discontinued.

Both the websites show that Array.fill is the fastest method.

Reference links:

3
  • Your test for "for loop" does not provide the fixed initial size for the array. This makes your comparison wrong. For loop is faster. na.cx/i/TPf5CQu.png Commented Jan 11 at 16:01
  • Thank you for the comment @Chester-fung. Does this mean that in my codebase the performance would vary depending on how I initialize the array? I mean const A = [] vs const A = Array(1e7)
    – Gangula
    Commented Jan 12 at 4:31
  • Yes. This is always important in every programming language. Browser will automatically set and expand when needed. for the testing case, i guess there will be serval times to expand the array. for example, initial size will be 100, then expand to 800, then expand to 16000, etc. These operations take time to do. However, this is just micro optimization. In daily use, you don't need to take care of it. Commented Jan 13 at 13:36

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