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When running through the test the count variable from the class stack1 gets reset back to 0 when using its pop function. Strangely however, during the push loop, the count increases as intended but when pop occurs, the count gets reset back to 0 and subtracts into the negatives from there. Is there something I'm forgetting?

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class TheStack
{
    public:
        TheStack();
        void push(int);
        int pop();
        bool isEmpty();
    private:
        const int MaxSize = 10;
        int arr[10];
        int count;
};

TheStack::TheStack()
{
    count = 0;
}

void TheStack::push(int userInput)
{
    if (count >= MaxSize)
    {
        cout << "Stack is full." << endl;
    }
    else
    {
        arr[count] = userInput;
        count+=1;
    }
}

int TheStack::pop()
{
    if (isEmpty())
    {
        cout << "Stack is empty." << endl;
    }
    else
    {
        int temp = arr[count];
        arr[count] = NULL;
        count-=1;
        return temp;
    }
}

bool TheStack::isEmpty()
{
    if (count == 0)
    {
        return true;
    }
    else
    {
        return false;
    }
}



int main()
{
    TheStack stack1;
    if (stack1.isEmpty())
    {
        cout << "isEmpty() works" << endl;
    }

    stack1.pop();

    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        stack1.push(i);
    }

    stack1.push(0);

    stack1.pop();
    stack1.pop();
    stack1.pop();
    stack1.pop();

    system("pause");

}

2 Answers 2

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When you do push you first save the data into the array and then increment count. This means that in order to properly do pop you need to work in reverse: first decrement count and only then read data from the array.

But in the code you are doing it backwards. When the stack is full, count is at max value (10 in your case), and your arr[count] = NULL; writes beyond the array boundary. This causes undefined behavior and, in particular, destroys your count value. (This is why it suddenly becomes 0.)

Also:

  1. arr[count] = NULL; makes no sense. NULL is supposed to be used in pointer contexts, not in integer contexts. This is not even guaranteed to compile.

    What is the point of that anyway? Initially your array contains garbage above the current top of the stack. Why do you suddenly care to clean it up after doing pop?

  2. Not all control paths of pop() return value. This is undefined behavior in itself.

  3. const int MaxSize = 10; in the class definition is a C++11 feature. Since you are already using C++11, you can do the same for count. Just do int count = 0; right inside the class definition and you will not have to write the constructor explicitly.

    Although in your implementation MaxSize would make more sense as a static const class member. In that case you'll also be able to declare your array as int arr[MaxSize];.

2
  • For the NULL I just wanted to make it clear that the array "popped" off the member for the assignment's purpose. Not sure if there's a better way to do it than just reassigning it to 0? Also for pop(), do I need to change it? If I return something then the cout in main would spit that value out. Commented Feb 17, 2018 at 3:13
  • @Michael Li: If you want to set it to 0, set it to 0. Not to NULL. NULL is completely out of place in this context. But again, nothing bad will happen if you just leave the array element unchanged after pop. Commented Feb 17, 2018 at 3:14
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You must first decrease count and then access arr[count] in int TheStack::pop(). Now you get access above the last pushed element, event out of bound of array if the stack is full.

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