27

Quick question for react gurus ;)

React.Children.only is one of its top-level apis, and is very commonly used by react-redux (<Provider />) and React Router (<Router />) to inject store/router as context, what's the reason behind this, why not simply return props.children? Seems something to do with JSX?

EDIT: Please don't explain what is React.Children.only, i am asking for why using it instead of props.children, which seems more powerful/flexible.

2
  • the docs seem self explanatory - a nice way to verify you only get one child
    – Andy Ray
    Feb 17, 2018 at 4:21
  • the reason is why you wanna define an interface with only one child, it's common in app's perspective to return props.children as an array of elements right?
    – lxyyz
    Feb 17, 2018 at 4:23

2 Answers 2

20

As pointed out in the docs

Verifies that children has only one child (a React element) and returns it. Otherwise this method throws an error.

So now why is it helpful over just using props.children?

The main reason is it's throwing an error, thus halting the whole dev flow, so you cannot skip it.

This is a handy util that enforces a rule of having specifically and only one child.

Of course, you could use propTypes, but that will only put a warning in the console, that you might as well miss.

One use case of React.Children.only can be to enforce specific declarative interface that should consist of one logical Child component:

class GraphEditorEditor extends React.Component {
  componentDidMount() {
    this.props.editor.makeEditable();
    // and all other editor specific logic
  }

  render() {
    return null;
  }
}

class GraphEditorPreview extends React.Component {
  componentDidMount() {
    this.props.editor.makePreviewable();
    // and all other preview specific logic
  }

  render() {
    return null;
  }
}

class GraphEditor extends React.Component {
  static Editor = GraphEditorEditor;
  static Preview = GraphEditorPreview;
  wrapperRef = React.createRef();

  state = {
    editorInitialized: false
  }

  componentDidMount() {
    // instantiate base graph to work with in logical children components
    this.editor = SomeService.createEditorInstance(this.props.config);
    this.editor.insertSelfInto(this.wrapperRef.current);

    this.setState({ editorInitialized: true });
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <div ref={this.wrapperRef}>
        {this.editorInitialized ?
          React.Children.only(
            React.cloneElement(
              this.props.children, 
              { editor: this.editor }
            )
          ) : null
        }
      </div>
    );
  }
}

which can be used like this:

class ParentContainer extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return (
      <GraphEditor config={{some: "config"}}>
        <GraphEditor.Editor> //<-- EDITOR mode
      </GraphEditor>
    )
  }
}

// OR

class ParentContainer extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return (
      <GraphEditor config={{some: "config"}}>
        <GraphEditor.Preview> //<-- Preview mode
      </GraphEditor>
    )
  }
}

Hope this is helpful.

8
  • thanks for your answer, i think the reason you pointed out to restrict only one child can be handled by PropTypes.element, well propTypes doesn't enforce runtime safe, but that's another topic for typescript/flow. and i don't think it has anything to do with render prop, since both redux provider & react-router's Router didn't use this, but they do use React.Children.only. thanks anyways!
    – lxyyz
    Feb 18, 2018 at 20:30
  • @Xlee I was not pointing out that these projects specifically do use render props, but a lot do. Here is one for example github.com/chenglou/react-radio-group/blob/… Feb 18, 2018 at 20:55
  • @Xlee in regards to the enforcing, here is the commit in react-router explicitly outlining the purpose github.com/ReactTraining/react-router/commit/… Feb 18, 2018 at 20:56
  • I mean i personally like render props a lot since it's cool and useful, but at the end you're gonna find they're just one of many component's patterns with pros & cons based on use case. Regarding that commit, it simply tells that React.Children.only can be used to enforcing single child, but it doesn't mean it's designed for this. My question is like why redux provider is enforcing its users to only pass one child and you're telling how they make this happen which i already know, right?
    – lxyyz
    Feb 18, 2018 at 21:48
  • 2
    @Xlee no what I am telling is, they use React.Children.only because they want to process a single React.Element and not, say, an array. It's a simple safeguard, they don't want to handle logic for when you pass array, obviously. it's the only logical explanation that comes out of their code and the definition of React.Children.only itself. If you seek for any hidden meanings I think your best bet is with creators, ask Dan directly and let us all know :) Good luck. Feb 18, 2018 at 22:47
0

Before React 16, a Component's render method could not return an array of elements. When implementing a component that didn't introduce any of its own markup, you had no choice but to only accept a single child:

// We have to ensure that there's only one child, because returning an array
// from a component is prohibited.
const DisplayIf = ({children, condition}, {uniforms}) =>
    condition(uniforms) ? Children.only(children) : nothing;
DisplayIf.contextTypes = BaseField.contextTypes;

Now you can simply return props.children, requiring the caller to include keys on array elements, or return <>{props.children}</>, using a Fragment to avoid returning an array:

const DisplayIf = ({children, condition}, {uniforms}) =>
    condition(uniforms) ? <>{children}</> : nothing;
DisplayIf.contextTypes = BaseField.contextTypes;
1
  • Just note that this <DisplayIf><SomeComponent /></DisplayIf> is a bad idea - the SomeComponent is always rendered and if the condition is not met, it is just thrown away by DisplayIf. Therefore if SomeComponent is expensive to render or can produce errors when it's not expected to show up, this can cause problems.
    – amik
    Oct 14, 2019 at 13:32

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.