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I am familiar with R - and i am finding it difficult to do r style matrix functions (instead of loops) with a problem i am working on.

The basic function is this - i have a bunch of variables obtained from multiple subjects. I run a PCA on the variables for dimension reduction. Then i select a number of principal components that explains 90% of the variance. I create a regression model to be able to predict the principal components from the demographic information from the original dataset.

I then attempt to go in reverse - i create a simulated dataset with the demographic variables. I use the simulated variables to predict a new set of principal components. I use the predicted components to calculate the measured variable that would be associated with the simulated subject.

The code i have for this -

    #create a random dataset
    library (truncnorm)
    subject= c(1:10)
    age = rtruncnorm(10,a=10,b=90, mean=30,sd=40)
    gender = sample(c("M","F"), prob=c(.48,.52), 10, replace = TRUE)
    #5 variables obtained from each subject
    v1 = rtruncnorm(10,a=12,b=23, mean=18,sd=6)
    v2 = rtruncnorm(10,a=14,b=28, mean=16,sd=10)
    v3 = rtruncnorm(10,a=25,b=43, mean=34,sd=8)
    v4 = rtruncnorm(10,a=9,b=33, mean=21,sd=12)
    v5 = rtruncnorm(10,a=3,b=8, mean=5.5,sd=2.5)

    #this is our main data frame
    mydata = data.frame(subject,age,gender,v1,v2,v3,v4,v5)

    #run pca on the main data
    mypca <- prcomp(mydata[4:8], center = TRUE, scale = TRUE )
    summary(mypca)


    #add the principal components to the data frame
    mydata = data.frame(mydata,mypca$x)

    #create a simple regression model 
    #predict the principal component using demographics from our data
    #only use 3 principal components
    regression_model <- list()
    for (i in 1:3)
    {
      var <- sprintf("lm(PC%d~as.numeric(age)+as.factor(gender),mydata)", i)
      regression_model[[i]] <- eval(parse(text = var))
      summary(regression_model[[i]])
    }


    #simulate data for prediction
    subject= c(1:100)
    age = rtruncnorm(100,a=10,b=90, mean=30,sd=40)
    gender = sample(c("M","F"), prob=c(.48,.52), 100, replace = TRUE)

    simulated_data = data.frame(subject, age, gender)



    #predict the principal components from the simulated data
    #project the principal components back to original variables
    predicted_data = data.frame()
    for (row in 1:nrow(simulated_data))
    {
      predicted_pc = list()
      #predict each PC from the regression model using predict function
      newdata = simulated_data[row,]
      for (i in 1:3)
      {

        prediction<-predict(regression_model[[i]],newdata = newdata, interval = "prediction")
        #once we have a prediction we choose a random value between
        #the lower and upper prediction interval
        #This is done to effectively add random noise into the predicted value
        lower_interval = prediction[2]
        upper_interval = prediction[3]
        mean = prediction[1]
        sd=upper_interval-mean
        predicted_pc[[i]]=rtruncnorm(1,a=lower_interval,b=upper_interval,mean=mean,sd=sd)
      }

      #convert the predicted PCs into a data frame
      predicted_pc_matrix<- t(as.matrix(as.numeric(predicted_pc)))
      colnames(predicted_pc_matrix)<-c(colnames(mypca$x[,1:3]))


      #use the newly predicted PCs to calculate back to our variables
      predicted_vars<-t(t(predicted_pc_matrix %*% t(mypca$rotation[,1:3])) * mypca$scale + mypca$center)

      #build the predicted data frame
      predicted_data<-rbind(predicted_data,cbind(newdata,predicted_vars))

    }

    #the predicted data frame has the predicted data for the 100 simulated subjects
    head(predicted_data)

This works and i am getting a predicted data frame at the end. It seems to slow down as i increase the number of simulated data (to be expected).

My question is - how would i remove the for loops and take advantage of R's matrix formats and faster processing of matrices?

0

After some research i found a way to convert the loops to matrix statements - Here it is

    #create a random dataset
    library (truncnorm)
    subject= c(1:10)
    age = rtruncnorm(10,a=10,b=90, mean=30,sd=40)
    gender = sample(c("M","F"), prob=c(.48,.52), 10, replace = TRUE)
    #5 variables obtained from each subject
    v1 = rtruncnorm(10,a=12,b=23, mean=18,sd=6)
    v2 = rtruncnorm(10,a=14,b=28, mean=16,sd=10)
    v3 = rtruncnorm(10,a=25,b=43, mean=34,sd=8)
    v4 = rtruncnorm(10,a=9,b=33, mean=21,sd=12)
    v5 = rtruncnorm(10,a=3,b=8, mean=5.5,sd=2.5)

    #this is our main data frame
    mydata = data.frame(subject,age,gender,v1,v2,v3,v4,v5)

    #run pca on the main data
    mypca <- prcomp(mydata[4:8], center = TRUE, scale = TRUE )
    summary(mypca)


    #simulate data for prediction
    subject= c(1:100)
    age = rtruncnorm(100,a=10,b=90, mean=30,sd=40)
    gender = sample(c("M","F"), prob=c(.48,.52), 100, replace = TRUE)

    simulated_data = data.frame(subject, age, gender)



    #################old loop based approach #########################

    ##add the principal components to the data frame
    ##mydata = data.frame(mydata,mypca$x)
    ##
    ##create a simple regression model 
    ##predict the principal component using demographics from our data
    ##only use 3 principal components
    ##
    ##
    ##regression_model <- list()
    ##for (i in 1:3)
    ##{
    ##  var <- sprintf("lm(PC%d~as.numeric(age)+as.factor(gender),mydata)", i)
    ##  regression_model[[i]] <- eval(parse(text = var))
    ##  summary(regression_model[[i]])
    ##}
    ##
    ##predict the principal components from the simulated data
    ##project the principal components back to original variables
    ##predicted_data = data.frame()
    ##for (row in 1:nrow(simulated_data))
    ##{
    ##  predicted_pc = list()
    ##  #predict each PC from the regression model using predict function
    ##  newdata = simulated_data[row,]
    ##  for (i in 1:3)
    ##  {
    ##
    ##   prediction<-predict(regression_model[[i]],newdata = newdata, interval = "prediction")
    ##   #once we have a prediction we choose a random value between
    ##   #the lower and upper prediction interval
    ##   #This is done to effectively add random noise into the predicted value
    ##   lower_interval = prediction[2]
    ##   upper_interval = prediction[3]
    ##   mean = prediction[1]
    ##   sd=upper_interval-mean
    ##   predicted_pc[[i]]=rtruncnorm(1,a=lower_interval,b=upper_interval,mean=mean,sd=sd)
    ##  }
    ##
    ##  #convert the predicted PCs into a data frame
    ##  predicted_pc_matrix<- t(as.matrix(as.numeric(predicted_pc)))
    ##  colnames(predicted_pc_matrix)<-c(colnames(mypca$x[,1:3]))
    ##
    ##
    ##  #use the newly predicted PCs to calculate back to our variables
    ##  predicted_vars<-t(t(predicted_pc_matrix %*% t(mypca$rotation[,1:3])) * mypca$scale + mypca$center)
    ##
    ##  #build the predicted data frame
    ##  predicted_data<-rbind(predicted_data,cbind(newdata,predicted_vars))
    ##
    ##}
    ###################################################################







    #################new matrix based approach #######################

    #add the principal components to the data frame
    mydata$x = mypca$x

    #create a simple regression model 
    regression_model = lm(x~as.numeric(age)+factor(gender),data=mydata)

    #predict the principal components from the simulated data
    output=predict(regression_model,newdata = simulated_data)

    #unfortunately MLM doesnt give us prediction intervals
    #so calculate intervals manually


    object = regression_model
    newdata = simulated_data
    level = 0.95
    tfrac <- qt((1 - level)/2, object$df.residual)

    form <- formula(object)
    form[[2]] <- NULL
    X <- model.matrix(form, newdata)
    Q =  forwardsolve(t(qr.R(object$qr)), t(X))
    unscaled.se <- sqrt(colSums(Q ^ 2))
    res.var <- sqrt(colSums(residuals(object) ^ 2) / object$df.residual)
    pred.var = res.var
    ip=tcrossprod(unscaled.se, res.var)

    hwid <- tfrac * sqrt(ip + pred.var)


    #prediction interval - lower and upper
    lwr = output - hwid
    upr = output + hwid
    mn = output
    sd = hwid

    #use the prediction interval to find a random value 
    #between lower and upper interval 
    #this will serve as our predicted pc
    predicted_pc= rtruncnorm(1,a=lwr, b= upr, mean = mn, sd = sd)
    predicted_pc = matrix(unlist(predicted_pc),ncol=ncol(mypca$x),byrow = FALSE)

    #use the newly predicted PCs to calculate back to our variables
    predicted_vars<-t(t(predicted_pc %*% t(mypca$rotation)) * mypca$scale + mypca$center)

    #build the predicted data frame
    predicted_data=cbind(simulated_data,predicted_vars)


    ###################################################################



    #the predicted data frame has the predicted data for the 100 simulated subjects
    head(predicted_data)

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