494

Given the name of a Python package that can be installed with pip, is there any way to find out a list of all the possible versions of it that pip could install? Right now it's trial and error.

I'm trying to install a version for a third party library, but the newest version is too new, there were backwards incompatible changes made. So I'd like to somehow have a list of all the versions that pip knows about, so that I can test them.

  • 1
    The accepted answer is not equivalent to the other one with the script as they do not generate the same output. – oligofren Apr 12 '13 at 12:04
  • 23
    Please update the selected answer. Yolk is broken and unneeded. The answer with pip install pylibmc== is perfect. – Jonathan Sep 11 '17 at 18:25
  • Please update the accepted answer as @Jonathan suggests. I wouldn't call it perfect because it won't work on earlier versions of pip (v7 or v8), but is great otherwise. – Antony Hatchkins Sep 28 '17 at 8:23
  • 2
    @Rory please update the accepted answer, yolk is dead. Chris Montanaro's answer is the best method currently IMO. – Ryan Fisher Dec 6 '17 at 17:50
  • 3
    @Rory Please change the accepted answer for the benefit of future visitors to this popular question. Yolk project is no longer maintained and it simply doesn't work as that answer claims. – wim Nov 1 '19 at 15:35

17 Answers 17

171

(update: As of March 2020, many people have reported that yolk, installed via pip install yolk3k, only returns latest version. Chris's answer seems to have the most upvotes and worked for me)

The script at pastebin does work. However it's not very convenient if you're working with multiple environments/hosts because you will have to copy/create it every time.

A better all-around solution would be to use yolk3k, which is available to install with pip. E.g. to see what versions of Django are available:

$ pip install yolk3k
$ yolk -V django
Django 1.3
Django 1.2.5
Django 1.2.4
Django 1.2.3
Django 1.2.2
Django 1.2.1
Django 1.2
Django 1.1.4
Django 1.1.3
Django 1.1.2
Django 1.0.4

yolk3k is a fork of the original yolk which ceased development in 2012. Though yolk is no longer maintained (as indicated in comments below), yolk3k appears to be and supports Python 3.

Note: I am not involved in the development of yolk3k. If something doesn't seem to work as it should, leaving a comment here should not make much difference. Use the yolk3k issue tracker instead and consider submitting a fix, if possible.

| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    The answer below (using the script from pastebin) is more cumbersome, but at least works in my case (searching for versions of scipy). yolk only shows the last version being available, the other script shows all versions dating back to 0.8.0. – oligofren Apr 12 '13 at 12:02
  • 33
    Most of the time it will only return newest version – PawelRoman Dec 23 '14 at 11:49
  • 17
    Fir python3 just use pip install yolk3k. The yolk command will be available. – Pierre Criulanscy Apr 3 '15 at 14:32
  • 10
    Like yolk, most of the time yolk3k only return newest version. – diabloneo May 26 '15 at 6:47
  • 5
    yolk is broken / no longer maintained. delete this answer. – wim Nov 1 '19 at 15:05
938

For pip >= 9.0 use

$ pip install pylibmc==
Collecting pylibmc==
  Could not find a version that satisfies the requirement pylibmc== (from 
  versions: 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5.1, 0.5.2, 0.5.3, 0.5.4, 0.5.5, 0.5, 0.6.1, 0.6, 
  0.7.1, 0.7.2, 0.7.3, 0.7.4, 0.7, 0.8.1, 0.8.2, 0.8, 0.9.1, 0.9.2, 0.9, 
  1.0-alpha, 1.0-beta, 1.0, 1.1.1, 1.1, 1.2.0, 1.2.1, 1.2.2, 1.2.3, 1.3.0)
No matching distribution found for pylibmc==

– all the available versions will be printed without actually downloading or installing any additional packages.

For pip < 9.0 use

pip install pylibmc==blork

where blork can be any string that is not a valid version number.

| improve this answer | |
  • 46
    I find it odd that pip's error spits out all the versions but they have no argument to explicitly get at said data – Chris Montanaro Apr 17 '15 at 18:22
  • 2
    Another nice property of this solution is that it works with all the normal flags to limit installation sources. For example pip install --only-binary :all: pylibmc will list all the versions of pylibmc available as binary packages. – pavon Nov 7 '16 at 20:42
  • 3
    pip install pylibmc==9999999 | tr ', ' "\n" | sort -n – Vikas Apr 6 '17 at 1:01
  • 31
    This should be marked as the correct answer as it does not necessitate any other packages to be installed. – Yves Dorfsman Jan 2 '18 at 4:10
  • 9
    It's a bit ridiculous that this seems to be the only way to do this in pip. I hope there is at least an open issue about this on their bug tracker? – pmos Jun 1 '18 at 12:07
73

You don't need a third party package to get this information. pypi provides simple JSON feeds for all packages under

https://pypi.org/pypi/{PKG_NAME}/json

Here's some Python code using only the standard library which gets all versions.

import json
import urllib2
from distutils.version import StrictVersion

def versions(package_name):
    url = "https://pypi.org/pypi/%s/json" % (package_name,)
    data = json.load(urllib2.urlopen(urllib2.Request(url)))
    versions = data["releases"].keys()
    versions.sort(key=StrictVersion)
    return versions

print "\n".join(versions("scikit-image"))

That code prints (as of Feb 23rd, 2015):

0.7.2
0.8.0
0.8.1
0.8.2
0.9.0
0.9.1
0.9.2
0.9.3
0.10.0
0.10.1
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    The JSON has a fair amount of nesting. I used versions = [x for x in data["releases"] if any([y["python_version"] in ['cp26', '2.6'] for y in data["releases"][x]])] to find versions compatible with Python 2.6. (I didn't see cp26 anywhere, but some packages had cp27 so I speculate that this might exist in other packages.) – tripleee Mar 18 '16 at 8:17
  • 2
    Here's a way to do it with curl, jq, and sort (a "one-liner"!): curl -s https://pypi.python.org/pypi/{PKG_NAME}/json | jq -r '.releases | keys[]' | sort -t. -k 1,1n -k 2,2n -k 3,3n – Alan Ivey Jun 8 '16 at 15:33
  • 2
    This throws a ValueError exception for some packages that follow not so strict versioning schemes. To fix it for these packages, see this gist. – TrinitronX Feb 7 '17 at 17:50
  • outdated will do this for you. – shadi Oct 8 '19 at 14:48
  • 1
    Annoyingly StrictVersion doesn't work with packages with dev in their names. – user916367 Jun 23 at 10:25
69

Update:
As of Sep 2017 this method no longer works: --no-install was removed in pip 7

Use pip install -v, you can see all versions that available

root@node7:~# pip install web.py -v
Downloading/unpacking web.py
  Using version 0.37 (newest of versions: 0.37, 0.36, 0.35, 0.34, 0.33, 0.33, 0.32, 0.31, 0.22, 0.2)
  Downloading web.py-0.37.tar.gz (90Kb): 90Kb downloaded
  Running setup.py egg_info for package web.py
    running egg_info
    creating pip-egg-info/web.py.egg-info

To not install any package, use one of following solution:

root@node7:~# pip install --no-deps --no-install flask -v                                                                                                      
Downloading/unpacking flask
  Using version 0.10.1 (newest of versions: 0.10.1, 0.10, 0.9, 0.8.1, 0.8, 0.7.2, 0.7.1, 0.7, 0.6.1, 0.6, 0.5.2, 0.5.1, 0.5, 0.4, 0.3.1, 0.3, 0.2, 0.1)
  Downloading Flask-0.10.1.tar.gz (544Kb): 544Kb downloaded

or

root@node7:~# cd $(mktemp -d)
root@node7:/tmp/tmp.c6H99cWD0g# pip install flask -d . -v
Downloading/unpacking flask
  Using version 0.10.1 (newest of versions: 0.10.1, 0.10, 0.9, 0.8.1, 0.8, 0.7.2, 0.7.1, 0.7, 0.6.1, 0.6, 0.5.2, 0.5.1, 0.5, 0.4, 0.3.1, 0.3, 0.2, 0.1)
  Downloading Flask-0.10.1.tar.gz (544Kb): 4.1Kb downloaded

Tested with pip 1.0

root@node7:~# pip --version
pip 1.0 from /usr/lib/python2.7/dist-packages (python 2.7)
| improve this answer | |
  • 11
    pip 1.5.4 gives DEPRECATION: --no-install, --no-download, --build, and --no-clean are deprecated. See https://github.com/pypa/pip/issues/906. and doesn't show available versions for packages that are already installed. – int_ua Mar 24 '15 at 16:22
  • 2
    to show all of versions, it just needs -v. The rest of my answer is for avoiding addition effect (install/download). For installed pkg, just add --upgrade. Anw, you can create a separate virtualenv to make everything simpler. – HVNSweeting Mar 25 '15 at 8:18
  • 2
    pip 9.0.1 barks: no such option: --no-install – moin moin Jan 17 '17 at 15:40
  • "newest of versions:" from -v excludes some versions. – mmacvicar Jun 8 '17 at 18:38
22

I came up with dead-simple bash script. Thanks to jq's author.

#!/bin/bash
set -e

PACKAGE_JSON_URL="https://pypi.org/pypi/${1}/json"

curl -s "$PACKAGE_JSON_URL" | jq  -r '.releases | keys | .[]' | sort -V

Update: Add sorting by version number.

| improve this answer | |
  • I was unable to get curl to work, possibly because of certificate errors. wget --no-check-certificate works, but even curl -k --insecure produces nothing. The warning I get with wget says ERROR: certificate common name `www.python.org´ doesn´t match requested host name `pypi.python.org´. – tripleee Mar 18 '16 at 7:57
  • The sort -V doesn't work on OSX with homebrew's version of jq – deepelement May 8 '17 at 10:09
  • @deepelement See my answer for a workaround when sort -V is not available. – SebMa Nov 16 at 22:54
16

After looking at pip's code for a while, it looks like the code responsible for locating packages can be found in the PackageFinder class in pip.index. Its method find_requirement looks up the versions of a InstallRequirement, but unfortunately only returns the most recent version.

The code below is almost a 1:1 copy of the original function, with the return in line 114 changed to return all versions.

The script expects one package name as first and only argument and returns all versions.

http://pastebin.com/axzdUQhZ

I can't guarantee for the correctness, as I'm not familiar with pip's code. But hopefully this helps.

Sample output

python test.py pip
Versions of pip
0.8.2
0.8.1
0.8
0.7.2
0.7.1
0.7
0.6.3
0.6.2
0.6.1
0.6
0.5.1
0.5
0.4
0.3.1
0.3
0.2.1
0.2 dev

The code:

import posixpath
import pkg_resources
import sys
from pip.download import url_to_path
from pip.exceptions import DistributionNotFound
from pip.index import PackageFinder, Link
from pip.log import logger
from pip.req import InstallRequirement
from pip.util import Inf


class MyPackageFinder(PackageFinder):

    def find_requirement(self, req, upgrade):
        url_name = req.url_name
        # Only check main index if index URL is given:
        main_index_url = None
        if self.index_urls:
            # Check that we have the url_name correctly spelled:
            main_index_url = Link(posixpath.join(self.index_urls[0], url_name))
            # This will also cache the page, so it's okay that we get it again later:
            page = self._get_page(main_index_url, req)
            if page is None:
                url_name = self._find_url_name(Link(self.index_urls[0]), url_name, req) or req.url_name

        # Combine index URLs with mirror URLs here to allow
        # adding more index URLs from requirements files
        all_index_urls = self.index_urls + self.mirror_urls

        def mkurl_pypi_url(url):
            loc = posixpath.join(url, url_name)
            # For maximum compatibility with easy_install, ensure the path
            # ends in a trailing slash.  Although this isn't in the spec
            # (and PyPI can handle it without the slash) some other index
            # implementations might break if they relied on easy_install's behavior.
            if not loc.endswith('/'):
                loc = loc + '/'
            return loc
        if url_name is not None:
            locations = [
                mkurl_pypi_url(url)
                for url in all_index_urls] + self.find_links
        else:
            locations = list(self.find_links)
        locations.extend(self.dependency_links)
        for version in req.absolute_versions:
            if url_name is not None and main_index_url is not None:
                locations = [
                    posixpath.join(main_index_url.url, version)] + locations

        file_locations, url_locations = self._sort_locations(locations)

        locations = [Link(url) for url in url_locations]
        logger.debug('URLs to search for versions for %s:' % req)
        for location in locations:
            logger.debug('* %s' % location)
        found_versions = []
        found_versions.extend(
            self._package_versions(
                [Link(url, '-f') for url in self.find_links], req.name.lower()))
        page_versions = []
        for page in self._get_pages(locations, req):
            logger.debug('Analyzing links from page %s' % page.url)
            logger.indent += 2
            try:
                page_versions.extend(self._package_versions(page.links, req.name.lower()))
            finally:
                logger.indent -= 2
        dependency_versions = list(self._package_versions(
            [Link(url) for url in self.dependency_links], req.name.lower()))
        if dependency_versions:
            logger.info('dependency_links found: %s' % ', '.join([link.url for parsed, link, version in dependency_versions]))
        file_versions = list(self._package_versions(
                [Link(url) for url in file_locations], req.name.lower()))
        if not found_versions and not page_versions and not dependency_versions and not file_versions:
            logger.fatal('Could not find any downloads that satisfy the requirement %s' % req)
            raise DistributionNotFound('No distributions at all found for %s' % req)
        if req.satisfied_by is not None:
            found_versions.append((req.satisfied_by.parsed_version, Inf, req.satisfied_by.version))
        if file_versions:
            file_versions.sort(reverse=True)
            logger.info('Local files found: %s' % ', '.join([url_to_path(link.url) for parsed, link, version in file_versions]))
            found_versions = file_versions + found_versions
        all_versions = found_versions + page_versions + dependency_versions
        applicable_versions = []
        for (parsed_version, link, version) in all_versions:
            if version not in req.req:
                logger.info("Ignoring link %s, version %s doesn't match %s"
                            % (link, version, ','.join([''.join(s) for s in req.req.specs])))
                continue
            applicable_versions.append((link, version))
        applicable_versions = sorted(applicable_versions, key=lambda v: pkg_resources.parse_version(v[1]), reverse=True)
        existing_applicable = bool([link for link, version in applicable_versions if link is Inf])
        if not upgrade and existing_applicable:
            if applicable_versions[0][1] is Inf:
                logger.info('Existing installed version (%s) is most up-to-date and satisfies requirement'
                            % req.satisfied_by.version)
            else:
                logger.info('Existing installed version (%s) satisfies requirement (most up-to-date version is %s)'
                            % (req.satisfied_by.version, applicable_versions[0][1]))
            return None
        if not applicable_versions:
            logger.fatal('Could not find a version that satisfies the requirement %s (from versions: %s)'
                         % (req, ', '.join([version for parsed_version, link, version in found_versions])))
            raise DistributionNotFound('No distributions matching the version for %s' % req)
        if applicable_versions[0][0] is Inf:
            # We have an existing version, and its the best version
            logger.info('Installed version (%s) is most up-to-date (past versions: %s)'
                        % (req.satisfied_by.version, ', '.join([version for link, version in applicable_versions[1:]]) or 'none'))
            return None
        if len(applicable_versions) > 1:
            logger.info('Using version %s (newest of versions: %s)' %
                        (applicable_versions[0][1], ', '.join([version for link, version in applicable_versions])))
        return applicable_versions


if __name__ == '__main__':
    req = InstallRequirement.from_line(sys.argv[1], None)
    finder = MyPackageFinder([], ['http://pypi.python.org/simple/'])
    versions = finder.find_requirement(req, False)
    print 'Versions of %s' % sys.argv[1]
    for v in versions:
        print v[1]
| improve this answer | |
  • This worked a whole lot better than the answer above. skinny $ yolk -V scipy scipy 0.12.0 skinny $ python test.py scipy Versions of scipy 0.12.0 0.12.0 0.11.0 0.11.0 0.10.1 0.10.1 0.10.0 0.10.0 0.9.0 0.9.0 0.8.0 – oligofren Apr 12 '13 at 12:02
  • 1
    This usage is explicitly discouraged in the docs: "you must not use pip’s internal APIs in this way" – wim Nov 1 '19 at 15:03
15

You could the yolk3k package instead of yolk. yolk3k is a fork from the original yolk and it supports both python2 and 3.

https://github.com/myint/yolk

pip install yolk3k
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This was handy to know, since yolk doesn't work under python 3.x – Broken Man Sep 3 '14 at 9:19
  • 2
    yolk3k returns only the installed version for me: yolk -V attest Attest 0.5.3 – Antony Hatchkins Sep 28 '17 at 8:21
  • 3
    yolk3k seems to only return the latest version? – mvherweg Sep 6 '18 at 6:26
11

You can use this small Python 3 script (using only standard library modules) to grab the list of available versions for a package from PyPI using JSON API and print them in reverse chronological order. Unlike some other Python solutions posted here, this doesn't break on loose versions like django's 2.2rc1 or uwsgi's 2.0.17.1:

#!/usr/bin/env python3

import json
import sys
from urllib import request    
from pkg_resources import parse_version    

def versions(pkg_name):
    url = f'https://pypi.python.org/pypi/{pkg_name}/json'
    releases = json.loads(request.urlopen(url).read())['releases']
    return sorted(releases, key=parse_version, reverse=True)    

if __name__ == '__main__':
    print(*versions(sys.argv[1]), sep='\n')

Save the script and run it with the package name as an argument, e.g.:

python versions.py django
3.0a1
2.2.5
2.2.4
2.2.3
2.2.2
2.2.1
2.2
2.2rc1
...
| improve this answer | |
  • this one worked best for me - it produces a sorted list of valid version numbers. – Stevko Oct 21 at 20:06
8

This works for me on OSX:

pip install docker-compose== 2>&1 \
| grep -oE '(\(.*\))' \
| awk -F:\  '{print$NF}' \
| sed -E 's/( |\))//g' \
| tr ',' '\n'

It returns the list one per line:

1.1.0rc1
1.1.0rc2
1.1.0
1.2.0rc1
1.2.0rc2
1.2.0rc3
1.2.0rc4
1.2.0
1.3.0rc1
1.3.0rc2
1.3.0rc3
1.3.0
1.3.1
1.3.2
1.3.3
1.4.0rc1
1.4.0rc2
1.4.0rc3
1.4.0
1.4.1
1.4.2
1.5.0rc1
1.5.0rc2
1.5.0rc3
1.5.0
1.5.1
1.5.2
1.6.0rc1
1.6.0
1.6.1
1.6.2
1.7.0rc1
1.7.0rc2
1.7.0
1.7.1
1.8.0rc1
1.8.0rc2
1.8.0
1.8.1
1.9.0rc1
1.9.0rc2
1.9.0rc3
1.9.0rc4
1.9.0
1.10.0rc1
1.10.0rc2
1.10.0

Or to get the latest version available:

pip install docker-compose== 2>&1 \
| grep -oE '(\(.*\))' \
| awk -F:\  '{print$NF}' \
| sed -E 's/( |\))//g' \
| tr ',' '\n' \
| gsort -r -V \
| head -1
1.10.0rc2

Keep in mind gsort has to be installed (on OSX) to parse the versions. You can install it with brew install coreutils

| improve this answer | |
  • Jeez why did you even post this answer. @Chris Montaro's answer works and is elegant. This just needlessly introduces complication – Brian Leach May 26 '17 at 22:48
  • @BrianLeach smh...its the same approach filtered for use in a script... – grandma May 28 '17 at 0:19
  • 1
    Works in cygwin / bash for me, for the second solution use sort, not gsort in cygwin. – WebComer Sep 26 '18 at 17:24
  • Here python yields arguably a more readable code than bash... see @eric chiang's reply (hopefully:) above... – mirekphd Dec 30 '19 at 10:29
7

https://pypi.python.org/pypi/Django/ - works for packages whose maintainers choose to show all packages https://pypi.python.org/simple/pip/ - should do the trick anyhow (lists all links)

| improve this answer | |
5

My project luddite has this feature.

Example usage:

>>> import luddite
>>> luddite.get_versions_pypi("python-dateutil")
('0.1', '0.3', '0.4', '0.5', '1.0', '1.1', '1.2', '1.4', '1.4.1', '1.5', '2.0', '2.1', '2.2', '2.3', '2.4.0', '2.4.1', '2.4.2', '2.5.0', '2.5.1', '2.5.2', '2.5.3', '2.6.0', '2.6.1', '2.7.0', '2.7.1', '2.7.2', '2.7.3', '2.7.4', '2.7.5', '2.8.0')

It lists all versions of a package available, by querying the json API of https://pypi.org/

| improve this answer | |
  • It would be more instructive if you would tell us what your package is doing, otherwise you are just promoting your software :) – user228395 Nov 16 '19 at 22:04
  • @user228395 I thought it was obvious enough, but it list all versions of a package that's available, which was exactly what the title of the question asks about. Edited - better? – wim Nov 16 '19 at 22:33
  • Its workings of course. So it is essentially wrapping the solution presented by @Timofey Stolbov? – user228395 Nov 16 '19 at 22:52
  • 1
    @user228395 I would not call it "wrapping", since that answer uses bash, curl and jq - whereas luddite just uses the Python standard library (urllib). But the solution from Stolbov does use the same endpoint on pypi.org. May I ask what is the reason for your downvote? – wim Nov 16 '19 at 23:02
  • 1
    If you followed the link to the project detail page, you could see that the project's main feature is about checking requirements.txt files for out-of date packages. It is more than a couple of lines of code. In order to check a requirements.txt file, you need the functionality to list all package versions. This part is intentionally decoupled, and part of luddite's public API. And it's source Apache License 2.0, I think it's not really fair to call that a "black-box" software package. – wim Nov 16 '19 at 23:27
5

You can try to install package version that does to exist. Then pip will list available versions

pip install hell==99999
ERROR: Could not find a version that satisfies the requirement hell==99999
(from versions: 0.1.0, 0.2.0, 0.2.1, 0.2.2, 0.2.3, 0.2.4, 0.3.0,
0.3.1, 0.3.2, 0.3.3, 0.3.4, 0.4.0, 0.4.1)
ERROR: No matching distribution found for hell==99999
| improve this answer | |
3

Alternative solution is to use the Warehouse APIs:

https://warehouse.readthedocs.io/api-reference/json/#release

For instance for Flask:

import requests
r = requests.get("https://pypi.org/pypi/Flask/json")
print(r.json()['releases'].keys())

will print:

dict_keys(['0.1', '0.10', '0.10.1', '0.11', '0.11.1', '0.12', '0.12.1', '0.12.2', '0.12.3', '0.12.4', '0.2', '0.3', '0.3.1', '0.4', '0.5', '0.5.1', '0.5.2', '0.6', '0.6.1', '0.7', '0.7.1', '0.7.2', '0.8', '0.8.1', '0.9', '1.0', '1.0.1', '1.0.2'])
| improve this answer | |
2

I didn't have any luck with yolk, yolk3k or pip install -v but so I ended up using this (adapted to Python 3 from eric chiang's answer):

import json
import requests
from distutils.version import StrictVersion

def versions(package_name):
    url = "https://pypi.python.org/pypi/{}/json".format(package_name)
    data = requests.get(url).json()
    return sorted(list(data["releases"].keys()), key=StrictVersion, reverse=True)

>>> print("\n".join(versions("gunicorn")))
19.1.1
19.1.0
19.0.0
18.0
17.5
0.17.4
0.17.3
...
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    StrictVersion won't work for many packages (django, uwsgi, psycopg2 to name a few). You can use parse_version() from setuptools (see my answer for an example). – Eugene Yarmash Nov 22 '16 at 15:37
1

Simple bash script that relies only on python itself (I assume that in the context of the question it should be installed) and one of curl or wget. It has an assumption that you have setuptools package installed to sort versions (almost always installed). It doesn't rely on external dependencies such as:

  • jq which may not be present;
  • grep and awk that may behave differently on Linux and macOS.
curl --silent --location https://pypi.org/pypi/requests/json | python -c "import sys, json, pkg_resources; releases = json.load(sys.stdin)['releases']; print(' '.join(sorted(releases, key=pkg_resources.parse_version)))"

A little bit longer version with comments.

Put the package name into a variable:

PACKAGE=requests

Get versions (using curl):

VERSIONS=$(curl --silent --location https://pypi.org/pypi/$PACKAGE/json | python -c "import sys, json, pkg_resources; releases = json.load(sys.stdin)['releases']; print(' '.join(sorted(releases, key=pkg_resources.parse_version)))")

Get versions (using wget):

VERSIONS=$(wget -qO- https://pypi.org/pypi/$PACKAGE/json | python -c "import sys, json, pkg_resources; releases = json.load(sys.stdin)['releases']; print(' '.join(sorted(releases, key=pkg_resources.parse_version)))")

Print sorted versions:

echo $VERSIONS
| improve this answer | |
1

Here's my answer that sorts the list inside jq (for those who use systems where sort -V is not avalable) :

$ pythonPackage=certifi
$ curl -Ls https://pypi.org/pypi/$pythonPackage/json | jq -r '.releases | keys_unsorted | sort_by( split(".") | map(tonumber) )'
  ............. 
  "2019.3.9",
  "2019.6.16",
  "2019.9.11",
  "2019.11.28",
  "2020.4.5",
  "2020.4.5.1",
  "2020.4.5.2",
  "2020.6.20",
  "2020.11.8"
]

And to fetch the last version number of the package :

$ curl -Ls https://pypi.org/pypi/$pythonPackage/json | jq -r '.releases | keys_unsorted | sort_by( split(".") | map(tonumber) )[-1]'
2020.11.8

or a bit faster :

$ curl -Ls https://pypi.org/pypi/$pythonPackage/json | jq -r '.releases | keys_unsorted | max_by( split(".") | map(tonumber) )'
2020.11.8

Or even more simple :) :

$ curl -Ls https://pypi.org/pypi/$pythonPackage/json | jq -r .info.version
2020.11.8
| improve this answer | |
-1

My take is a combination of a couple of posted answers, with some modifications to make them easier to use from within a running python environment.

The idea is to provide a entirely new command (modeled after the install command) that gives you an instance of the package finder to use. The upside is that it works with, and uses, any indexes that pip supports and reads your local pip configuration files, so you get the correct results as you would with a normal pip install.

I've made an attempt at making it compatible with both pip v 9.x and 10.x.. but only tried it on 9.x

https://gist.github.com/kaos/68511bd013fcdebe766c981f50b473d4

#!/usr/bin/env python
# When you want a easy way to get at all (or the latest) version of a certain python package from a PyPi index.

import sys
import logging

try:
    from pip._internal import cmdoptions, main
    from pip._internal.commands import commands_dict
    from pip._internal.basecommand import RequirementCommand
except ImportError:
    from pip import cmdoptions, main
    from pip.commands import commands_dict
    from pip.basecommand import RequirementCommand

from pip._vendor.packaging.version import parse as parse_version

logger = logging.getLogger('pip')

class ListPkgVersionsCommand(RequirementCommand):
    """
    List all available versions for a given package from:

    - PyPI (and other indexes) using requirement specifiers.
    - VCS project urls.
    - Local project directories.
    - Local or remote source archives.

    """
    name = "list-pkg-versions"
    usage = """
      %prog [options] <requirement specifier> [package-index-options] ...
      %prog [options] [-e] <vcs project url> ...
      %prog [options] [-e] <local project path> ...
      %prog [options] <archive url/path> ..."""

    summary = 'List package versions.'

    def __init__(self, *args, **kw):
        super(ListPkgVersionsCommand, self).__init__(*args, **kw)

        cmd_opts = self.cmd_opts

        cmd_opts.add_option(cmdoptions.install_options())
        cmd_opts.add_option(cmdoptions.global_options())
        cmd_opts.add_option(cmdoptions.use_wheel())
        cmd_opts.add_option(cmdoptions.no_use_wheel())
        cmd_opts.add_option(cmdoptions.no_binary())
        cmd_opts.add_option(cmdoptions.only_binary())
        cmd_opts.add_option(cmdoptions.pre())
        cmd_opts.add_option(cmdoptions.require_hashes())

        index_opts = cmdoptions.make_option_group(
            cmdoptions.index_group,
            self.parser,
        )

        self.parser.insert_option_group(0, index_opts)
        self.parser.insert_option_group(0, cmd_opts)

    def run(self, options, args):
        cmdoptions.resolve_wheel_no_use_binary(options)
        cmdoptions.check_install_build_global(options)

        with self._build_session(options) as session:
            finder = self._build_package_finder(options, session)

            # do what you please with the finder object here... ;)
            for pkg in args:
                logger.info(
                    '%s: %s', pkg,
                    ', '.join(
                        sorted(
                            set(str(c.version) for c in finder.find_all_candidates(pkg)),
                            key=parse_version,
                        )
                    )
                )


commands_dict[ListPkgVersionsCommand.name] = ListPkgVersionsCommand

if __name__ == '__main__':
    sys.exit(main())

Example output

./list-pkg-versions.py list-pkg-versions pika django
pika: 0.5, 0.5.1, 0.5.2, 0.9.1a0, 0.9.2a0, 0.9.3, 0.9.4, 0.9.5, 0.9.6, 0.9.7, 0.9.8, 0.9.9, 0.9.10, 0.9.11, 0.9.12, 0.9.13, 0.9.14, 0.10.0b1, 0.10.0b2, 0.10.0, 0.11.0b1, 0.11.0, 0.11.1, 0.11.2, 0.12.0b2
django: 1.1.3, 1.1.4, 1.2, 1.2.1, 1.2.2, 1.2.3, 1.2.4, 1.2.5, 1.2.6, 1.2.7, 1.3, 1.3.1, 1.3.2, 1.3.3, 1.3.4, 1.3.5, 1.3.6, 1.3.7, 1.4, 1.4.1, 1.4.2, 1.4.3, 1.4.4, 1.4.5, 1.4.6, 1.4.7, 1.4.8, 1.4.9, 1.4.10, 1.4.11, 1.4.12, 1.4.13, 1.4.14, 1.4.15, 1.4.16, 1.4.17, 1.4.18, 1.4.19, 1.4.20, 1.4.21, 1.4.22, 1.5, 1.5.1, 1.5.2, 1.5.3, 1.5.4, 1.5.5, 1.5.6, 1.5.7, 1.5.8, 1.5.9, 1.5.10, 1.5.11, 1.5.12, 1.6, 1.6.1, 1.6.2, 1.6.3, 1.6.4, 1.6.5, 1.6.6, 1.6.7, 1.6.8, 1.6.9, 1.6.10, 1.6.11, 1.7, 1.7.1, 1.7.2, 1.7.3, 1.7.4, 1.7.5, 1.7.6, 1.7.7, 1.7.8, 1.7.9, 1.7.10, 1.7.11, 1.8a1, 1.8b1, 1.8b2, 1.8rc1, 1.8, 1.8.1, 1.8.2, 1.8.3, 1.8.4, 1.8.5, 1.8.6, 1.8.7, 1.8.8, 1.8.9, 1.8.10, 1.8.11, 1.8.12, 1.8.13, 1.8.14, 1.8.15, 1.8.16, 1.8.17, 1.8.18, 1.8.19, 1.9a1, 1.9b1, 1.9rc1, 1.9rc2, 1.9, 1.9.1, 1.9.2, 1.9.3, 1.9.4, 1.9.5, 1.9.6, 1.9.7, 1.9.8, 1.9.9, 1.9.10, 1.9.11, 1.9.12, 1.9.13, 1.10a1, 1.10b1, 1.10rc1, 1.10, 1.10.1, 1.10.2, 1.10.3, 1.10.4, 1.10.5, 1.10.6, 1.10.7, 1.10.8, 1.11a1, 1.11b1, 1.11rc1, 1.11, 1.11.1, 1.11.2, 1.11.3, 1.11.4, 1.11.5, 1.11.6, 1.11.7, 1.11.8, 1.11.9, 1.11.10, 1.11.11, 1.11.12, 2.0, 2.0.1, 2.0.2, 2.0.3, 2.0.4
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    this usage is explicitly discouraged in the docs: "you must not use pip’s internal APIs in this way" – wim Nov 1 '19 at 15:01

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