17

I just felt on pieces of php (symfony/laravel) code using question mark in method type hints :

public function functionName(?int $arg = 0)

In other occasions the ?type was not the last one, but I did not find any of these with no default yet.

Problem is, I cannot find any information about this, and I checked :

And same with 7.2, but since the code only requires 7.1, it seems rather normal.

I also googled, and searched here, but either this is not documented or the question marks topic is defeating search engines.

So I feel a little dumb now, and I would really appreciate if someone could enlighten me on the signification of this question mark in method signatures arguments.

Thanks

  • 3
    wiki.php.net/rfc/nullable_types – kerbholz Feb 20 '18 at 9:17
  • The very first part of your second link has the info...! Please read the links you post. – Jonnix Feb 20 '18 at 9:18
  • You're right lol. The worst thing is I knew about the meaning as return value. Thanks for the enlightenment – fab2s Feb 20 '18 at 21:07
22

It's a new feature in php7.1

http://php.net/manual/en/migration71.new-features.php

A question mark means that the type hinted parameter (or return value) is also allowed to be null.

So in your example $arg can be null or any integer.

3

Just a note to add to the previous answers - it must be either null or have a value in the specified type i.e. - you cannot just omit it - have a look at an example:

class TestClass {

    public function fetch(?array $extensions)
    {
        //...
    }        
}

Now if you call

(new TestClass)->fetch();

this will throw

ArgumentCountError : Too few arguments to function fetch() ...

To make it work without passing array of $extensions you'd have to call it with null as argument

(new TestClass)->fetch(null);

It works best in the situations, where you are passing argument initially set to null to another method for processing i.e.

class TestClass {

    public function fetch(array $extensions = null)
    {
        //...

        $this->filter($extensions);
    }

    private function filter(?array $extensions)
    {
        //...
    }
}

Now you can call the fetch method without the argument

(new TestClass)->fetch();
  • Exactly, and it makes perfect sens, without a default value, you only have the right to explicitly set the argument to null with the question mark, and with one, you can completely omit it. – fab2s Jul 22 '19 at 13:04

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