3

I want to do something along the lines of

enum A {
    Type1 {
        s: String
        // ... some more fields
    }
    // ... some more variants
}

impl A {
    fn consume(self) { println!("Consumed!"); }
}

fn fails() {
    let b = A::Type1 { s: String::from("Arbitrary string") };

    match b {
        A::Type1 {
            s, // (value moved here)
            // ... more fields
        } => {
            let l = s.len(); // Something using the field from the enum
            if l > 3 {
                s.into_bytes(); // do something that requires ownership of s
            } else {
                b.consume(); // Value used here after move
           }
        }
        // ... more cases
    }
}

However, because I destructure b in the match case, I don't have access to it within the body of the match.

I can reconstruct b from the fields, but when b has lots of fields this is obviously not ideal. Is there any way to get around this issue without having to rebuild b?

  • Do the destructured fields have to be owned, or are references sufficient? – CodesInChaos Feb 20 '18 at 18:23
  • They have to be owned (for example, to allow s.into_bytes() in the example above) – JackW Feb 20 '18 at 21:26
  • 2
    Owning the parts that come out of the destructuring means that the original object no longer exists. You can't have both. – Dan Hulme Feb 20 '18 at 23:33
  • Wouldn't as_bytes() suffice? If not, you'll have to clone b. – rubdos Feb 21 '18 at 9:27
  • into_bytes was just an example, the actual functions being used to need ownership. I guess it makes sense that it can't be done, though it is slightly annoying. Cloning won't work for me because I can't duplicate the actual data stored. Thanks though. – JackW Feb 21 '18 at 15:25
1

No, you (almost literally) cannot have your cake and eat it too. Once you have destructured the value, the value no longer exists.


When non-lexical lifetimes happens, you can use a combination of NLL and match guards to prevent taking ownership in the first place:

#![feature(nll)]

enum A {
    Type1 { s: String },
}

impl A {
    fn consume(self) {
        println!("Consumed!");
    }
}

fn main() {
    let b = A::Type1 {
        s: String::from("Arbitrary string"),
    };

    match b {
        A::Type1 { ref s } if s.len() <= 3 => {
            b.consume();
        }
        A::Type1 { s } => {
            s.into_bytes();
        }
    }
}

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