40

According to the draft of the standard N4713 (7.11/1):

A null pointer constant is an integer literal (5.13.2) with value zero or a prvalue of type std::nullptr_t.

and 21.2.3/2:

The macro NULL is an implementation-defined null pointer constant.

follow that NULL can be defined as nullptr. Same is mentioned on cppreference:

#define NULL 0
//since C++11
#define NULL nullptr

At the same time "Additive operators" clause says (8.5.6/7):

If the value 0 is added to or subtracted from a null pointer value, the result is a null pointer value. If two null pointer values are subtracted, the result compares equal to the value 0 converted to the type std::ptrdiff_t.

Hence the following code should be valid:

0 + nullptr; 
nullptr - nullptr; 

but because of the lack of +/- operators for std::nullptr_t the code is invalid.

Is there something that I didn't take into account or NULL macro can't be actually defined as nullptr?

  • 1
    yes it can. [[[[[[[[[[ – Cheers and hth. - Alf Feb 21 '18 at 10:55
  • "Is there something that I didn't take into account", yes, that you can add 0 to literal 0. – Cheers and hth. - Alf Feb 21 '18 at 10:56
  • 8
    Null pointer value and null pointer constant are two very different things. – n.m. Feb 21 '18 at 11:07
  • 5
    @Cheersandhth.-Alf It is a value, but it is not a "null pointer value." – Angew Feb 21 '18 at 11:14
  • 1
    @Cheersandhth.-Alf Of course it's a value, of type std::nullptr_t, which is not a pointer type, so there's no basis for calling it a "null pointer value" (it's not a pointer value at all). At any rate, the "Additive operators" clause lists types that may participate in additive operators, and std::nullptr_t is not one of those, so std::nullptr - std::nullptr is invalid whether you call std::nullptr "a null pointer value" or not. – n.m. Feb 21 '18 at 11:38
46

While nullptr is a null pointer constant, it is not a null pointer value. The latter is a value of some pointer type, which std::nullptr_t is not.

Reference:

A null pointer constant is an integer literal (5.13.2) with value zero or a prvalue of type std::nullptr_t. A null pointer constant can be converted to a pointer type; the result is the null pointer value of that type and is distinguishable from every other value of object pointer or function pointer type. Such a conversion is called a null pointer conversion. [...]

7.11/1 in N4659, emphasize mine

So NULL can indeed be nullptr without providing the arithmetic operators.

  • 6
    @Cheersandhth.-Alf - No, he deserves an up-vote because the standard text treats null pointer value as a term, and not just value. And if you want to dredge up past encounters, don't you go then blaming others for getting personal. – StoryTeller Feb 21 '18 at 11:00
  • 2
    @Cheersandhth.-Alf Sorry, but I fail to see how "nullptr itself is not a pointer value nor pointer. Thus arithmetic operations are not applicable to nullptr" is right if "it is not a null pointer value" is wrong. – Baum mit Augen Feb 21 '18 at 11:11
  • 2
    @Cheersandhth.-Alf C++17 7.11/1 "A null pointer constant is an integer literal (5.13.2) with value zero or a prvalue of type std::nullptr_t. A null pointer constant can be converted to a pointer type; the result is the null pointer value of that type and is distinguishable from every other value of object pointer or function pointer type. Such a conversion is called a null pointer conversion." This seems to pretty clearly indicate that nullptr (or any other prvalue of type std::nullptr_t) is not a "null pointer value." – Angew Feb 21 '18 at 11:13
  • 2
    @Cheersandhth.-Alf Whether or not it's a value is out of the question, but where does it say it's a null pointer value? – Baum mit Augen Feb 21 '18 at 11:17
  • 3
    I need new eyes. Sorry for the confusion! – Cheers and hth. - Alf Feb 21 '18 at 11:23
7

nullptr is a null pointer literal, and although the result of converting nullptr to a pointer type is the null pointer value, nullptr itself isn't of a pointer type, but of type std::nullptr_t. The arithmetic works if you do convert the nullptr to a pointer type:

0 + (int*)nullptr; 
(int*)nullptr - (int*)nullptr;

Can the NULL macro actually be a nullptr?

Yes, because nullptr is a null pointer literal.

Note that prior to C++11, the all of the null pointer literals in C++ happened to also be integer literals, so this bad code: char c = NULL; used to work in practice. If NULL is defined as nullptr, that code no longer works.

6

For addition, either both operands shall have arithmetic or unscoped enumeration type, or one operand shall be a pointer to a completely-defined object type and the other shall have integral or unscoped enumeration type.

For subtraction, one of the following shall hold:
(2.1) both operands have arithmetic or unscoped enumeration type; or
(2.2) both operands are pointers to cv-qualified or cv-unqualified versions of the same completely-defined object type; or
(2.3) the left operand is a pointer to a completely-defined object type and the right operand has integral or unscoped enumeration type.

std::nullptr_t is none of those, hence std::nullptr cannot participate in additive operations.

Note that not even all pointer values can participate. For example, function pointer values and void pointer values cannot, even though either can be a null pointer value.

5

The keyword nullptr denotes the pointer literal. It is a prvalue of type std::nullptr_t. There exist implicit conversions from nullptr to null pointer value of any pointer type and any pointer to member type. nullptr itself is not a pointer value nor pointer. Thus arithmetic operations are not applicable to nullptr.

  • so 8.5.6/7 does not apply to nullptr because it is not a null pointer value? (deleted this comment after reading Baums answer and repostet after reading the discussion below that answer ;) – user463035818 Feb 21 '18 at 11:08
  • If nullptr is of std::nullptr_t type, and not of a pointer type, how is it a pointer literal? You may want to think about rephrasing a bit to be more accurate. – StoryTeller Feb 21 '18 at 11:09
  • @user463035818 Yes, you are correct. A prvalue (“pure” rvalue) is an rvalue that is not an xvalue. [Example: The result of calling a function whose return type is not a reference is a prvalue] - copied from here stackoverflow.com/questions/3601602/… – S.M. Feb 21 '18 at 11:10
  • @StoryTeller NULL is implementation-defined null pointer constant. nullptr_t is the type of the null pointer literal nullptr, like char is the type of char literal 'a', or const char const * is the type of the string literal "abc". – S.M. Feb 21 '18 at 11:15
  • I don't think you got what I was aiming for. Literals are typed values. Since nullptr_t is not a pointer type, nullptr can't be a pointer literal. – StoryTeller Feb 21 '18 at 11:17

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