The numeric root of x is computed as follows: a) Compute the sum, y, of all of x’s (decimal) digits; b) If y is greater than 10, then set x to y and go to step a). Otherwise, y is x’s numerical root. Thus, the numeric root of 10, 202 and 875 are 1, 4 and 2, respectively.

Here is my code:

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{

    int x, y, index, found;

    found = 0;
    scanf("%d", &x);

    if (x < 0)
    {
        printf("The input number must be nonnegative.\n");
    }
    else
    {
        y = 0;
        index = x % 10;

        while (found != 1)
        {
            while (x > 10)
            {
                y = y + index;
                x = (x - index) / 10;
                index = x % 10;
            }

            y = y + index;

            if (y < 10)
            {
                printf("%d\n", y);
                found = 1;
            }
            else
            {
                x = y;
            }
        }
    }

    return 0;
}

My output are always numbers like "-2147483623" etc. Any help will be appreciated.

  • 5
    use your debugger – pm100 Feb 21 at 22:10
  • 4
    Note that x = (x-index)/10; can be safely replaced by x = x / 10; – Eugene Sh. Feb 21 at 22:10
  • 1
    Using the debugger is a good idea. The other option is to use printf to display the values of x, y, and index at various points in the program. – user3386109 Feb 21 at 22:19
  • 3
    My running of the code is 10 -> 0, 202 -> 4, and 875 -> -2147483616. Learning how to use a debugger, as mentioned above, is part of learning to program. – KeithSmith Feb 21 at 22:21

Your solution can be greatly simplified with the use of a simple function. See the following solution using the Ada language:

with Ada.Integer_Text_IO; use Ada.Integer_Text_Io;
with Ada.Text_IO; use Ada.Text_IO;

procedure Main is
   Inpt_Value : Natural;
   Root       : Natural := 0;
   function Find_Root(X : Natural) return Natural is
      Value : Natural := X;
      Root  : Natural := 0;
   begin
      while Value > 0 loop
         Root  := Root + (Value mod 10);
         Value := Value / 10;
      end loop;
      return Root;
   end Find_Root;

begin
   Put("Enter a non-negative integer: ");
   Get(Item => Inpt_Value);
   Root := Find_Root(Inpt_Value);
   while Root > 10 loop
      Root := Find_Root(Root);
   end loop;
   Put_Line(Root'Image);
end Main;

I think that your problem is here :

if(y < 10){
    printf("%d\n",y);
    found = 1;
  }
  else{
    x = y;
  }

in your else statement you assign the value of x to y, but you don't change the value of y.

Maybe you should do something like this :

if(y < 10){
    printf("%d\n",y);
    found = 1;
  }
  else{
    x = y;
    y = 0;
    index = x % 10;
  }

In your entire program you don't seem to decrease or reset the value of y, that's why once the else block entered, there is no way to enter the if block, because y will increase and always be greater than 10 until an overflow happens, that's why y is negative at the end.

PS: Always use a debugger or printf statements it will help you detect such problems.

  • ie - add y = 0 after x = y – pm100 Feb 21 at 22:29
  • I will edit my answer. – nabil.douss Feb 21 at 22:32
  • Need also to add index = x % 10 in that section. So both y and index need to be properly re-initialized. I think the commenters generally know this, but trying to avoid giving away the answer to an OP that should learn some debugging. But alas... – lurker Feb 21 at 22:33
  • I got that ! Thanks a lot ! – Ratata4 Feb 21 at 22:49

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