19

Whenever I try to use MD5 on a Windows XP machine that has FIPS enabled, I am getting a System.InvalidOperationException.

Is there an alternate algorithm that I should use instead of MD5 on FIPS?

  • QUICK NOTE: If FIPS Algorithm Policy is enabled on your Windows Server, the the default Cryptography Providers located within System.Cryptography library will SHUT OFF. Keep this in mind when choosing solutions because System.Cryptography providers will NO LONGER be available. TOO SEE POLICY STATUS: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Lsa\fipsalgorithmpolicy – Prisoner ZERO Feb 8 '17 at 14:20
  • This answer on a duplicated question provide an alternative. – Frédéric Jul 16 '18 at 15:46
15

MD5 is not FIPS compliant. You can use instead of the MD5 one of the following hashing algorithms:

  • 2
    HMACSHA1 and MACTripleDES are both keyed, and serve a different purpose to plain hashes. They're not really direct replacements for MD5. – LukeH Feb 4 '11 at 0:23
  • You are right, but using a constant key can be enough to be a valid replacement. The SHA1CryptoServiceProvider, probably is the most appropriated in this case. All the HMACSHAxxx need a key :( – Borja Feb 4 '11 at 8:47
  • 6
    @CodyGray it's simply not true that there is 'absolutely no reason to ever use anything but the most secure algorithm' - security is always a tradeoff, and depending on the application, you need to consider such things as performance, storage requirements and interoperability – Cocowalla Aug 20 '12 at 18:08
  • 1
    @Cody Gray: Sometimes hashes are simply hashes for comparing fingerprints, not security-related or password hashes. – Scott Stafford Sep 11 '14 at 19:08
  • 1
    I came across this post because I'm deploying to a FIPS-mandated machine. Here, the particular use case doesn't require strong cryptographic security, even though the machine simply blacklists MD5. Which, in my case, is overboard and a nuisance. – Scott Stafford Sep 12 '14 at 1:04
12

When you enforce FIPS compliance in the Windows security policy settings, you're asserting that you are only going to use FIPS-certified encryption and hashing algorithms. MD5 is not one of these approved hashing algorithms, and that's why the exception is being thrown.

The workaround is simple: choose a different hashing algorithm. The .NET Framework provides plenty of other options in the System.Security.Cryptography namespace. Select one of the SHA family of algorithms. I can't imagine any reason you would have to use MD5 as opposed to one of the alternatives.

  • 1
    Are they all FIPS compliant or which one is a better alternative to MD5 that is FIPS compliant? – qazwsx Feb 3 '11 at 23:56
  • 2
    @qazwsx: Any of the SHA family is FIPS compliant. They're sorted in alphabetical order on the page, so you'll see the whole group towards the bottom. I don't know any compelling reason not to use SHA512. – Cody Gray Feb 3 '11 at 23:57
  • 5
    @CodyGray "I can't imagine any reason you would have to use MD5 as opposed to one of the alternatives." When interacting with a third party system that wants something MD5 hashed. – Micah Zoltu Jul 9 '15 at 15:58
  • If FIPS Algorithm Policy is enabled on your Windows Server, the the default Cryptography Providers located within System.Cryptography library will SHUT OFF. – Prisoner ZERO Feb 8 '17 at 14:22
0

You can use MD5Digest from Org.BouncyCastle.Crypto.Digests

MD5Digest hash = new MD5Digest();

public byte[] Hash(byte[] input)
{
     hash.BlockUpdate(input, 0, input.Length);
     byte[] result = new byte[hash.GetDigestSize()];
     hash.DoFinal(result, 0);
     return result;
}

public string Hash(string input)
{
     var data = System.Text.Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes(input);
     hash.BlockUpdate(data, 0, data.Length);
     byte[] result = new byte[hash.GetDigestSize()];
     hash.DoFinal(result, 0);

     return Hex.ToHexString(result).ToUpper();
}

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