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I present the output of perf report of my samples collected with the perf -g -p. I don't know how to implements the first column. There is a lot of Java_* calls that take > 90% time.

How to interpret it? enter image description here


In the presented result there is a lof of entries, I mean:

+ 98,78%     0,00%             java       libpthread-2.26.so
+ 95,77%     0,00%             java       libjvm.so 
...

And my question is:

Why is there more such entries than 1? Every entry is a kind of stacktrace. The one-threaded process has exactly one stacktrace.

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    That looks like a cumulative total, so the top-level parent of (almost?) everything gets (almost) all the CPU time for itself + children. Related: see Chandler Carruth's CppCon 2015 talk: "Tuning C++: Benchmarks, and CPUs, and Compilers! Oh My!" for some tips/tricks on using perf. Some of it should be applicable to Java (like the parts about interpreting the output, moreso than the parts about creating source that compiles the way you want without optimizing away your microbenchmark, or optimizing between iterations.) Commented Feb 23, 2018 at 23:21

1 Answer 1

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The list you refer to here:

+ 98,78%     0,00%             java       libpthread-2.26.so
+ 95,77%     0,00%             java       libjvm.so 

...

And my question is:

Why is there more such entries than 1? Every entry is a kind of stacktrace. The one-threaded process has exactly one stacktrace.

Is not a stack trace. It is a list of functions that have appeared in any stack trace in any sample during the run. Only when you expand one element of that list do you see a combined tree-view of stack traces that have contained that function.

I'm not sure what you mean by The one-threaded process has exactly one stacktrace. Any process will have a variety of stack traces over its lifetime, even if it has only one thread. For example, at the moment it starts, the stack trace would simply be main(), and as soon as main() calls a function, the stack trace changes to include that function and so on.

Now in the list of functions, the first column is showing you total overhead, including all children (i.e., including functions called by this function). Since almost all of the interesting work happens in a call chain that all share the same outermost functions, the top level is a kind of useless listing where many functions are shown with >90% of the overhead.

The second column is the "own" overhead, which means the amount of time1 actually spent in that method, not any children. This is close to zero for all the top methods, so the real work is happening in some method called by those methods, not in those methods themselves.

The tree view you have expanded at the top is really telling you what you need to know: ~94% of your time is spent inside/below radek.queue.wlQueue.writeBytes(), and that guy is spending most of its time in String.intern(). So the bottleneck here is all the String.intern() calls, possibly because the string table is too small, or just because String.intern() just generally sucks for de-duplication. My general rule here is just to use Guava's Interner<String> unless you specifically need the property that literal strings share the same string pool as interned strings (i.e., that "foo" == new String("foo").intern()).


1 I say "amount of time" here loosely - it's really the fraction of total samples of whatever event you've specified to perf record - but by default that should be approximately CPU time.

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  • Thanks for the great answer! :) Why are there any entries in such output? Because of the fact that program is multithreaded?
    – J. Doe
    Commented Feb 24, 2018 at 22:40
  • @J.Doe - no it doesn't have to do with multiple threads: it's just that this list shows all functions that appear in the stack trace of any function, and there are many such functions, so many lines appear. They add up to more than 100% because each includes all the time in called functions. So if you had a function A that called a function B which in turn called C, and each function took 1%, 1% and 98% of the total time respectively, you'd end up with a list like: 100% A, 99% B, 98% C.
    – BeeOnRope
    Commented Feb 27, 2018 at 2:34
  • I tried to add to my answer to make it clearer - the list you see at the bottom of your picture is not a stack trace - is a simple list of functions, ordered by "total overhead" (the first column).
    – BeeOnRope
    Commented Feb 27, 2018 at 2:38

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