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I have cloned my repo from github with my running git git version 2.16.2.windows.1.

However, when I want to commit it I get the following error:

error: open("src/hoc/Aux.js"): No such file or directory
error: unable to index file src/hoc/Aux.js
fatal: adding files failed

Below you can find the folder and file content:

enter image description here

Any suggestion what I am doing wrong?

I appreciate your replies!

Update

Please find below what git status gives me:

$ git status
On branch master
Your branch is up to date with 'origin/master'.

Untracked files:
  (use "git add <file>..." to include in what will be committed)

        .gitignore
        README.md
        config/
        package-lock.json
        package.json
        public/
        scripts/
        src/

nothing added to commit but untracked files present (use "git add" to track)

UPDATE 1

I still get the same error, even when manually adding the src folder:

marcus@Marcus-PC MINGW64 ~/Desktop/Coding Projects/demo-react-burger-builder (master)
$ git status
On branch master
Your branch is up to date with 'origin/master'.

Untracked files:
  (use "git add <file>..." to include in what will be committed)

        .gitignore
        README.md
        config/
        package-lock.json
        package.json
        public/
        scripts/
        src/

nothing added to commit but untracked files present (use "git add" to track)
  • 1
    What are you doing to commit your work? – Tim Biegeleisen Feb 24 '18 at 7:34
  • @TimBiegeleisen git add -A -- . && git commit -m "message" && git push origin master... – Anna.Klee Feb 24 '18 at 7:37
  • @TimBiegeleisen However, the command does not get over git add -A -- . as git commit simply adds an empty folder... – Anna.Klee Feb 24 '18 at 7:39
  • Does git status show that the files have in fact been staged? – Tim Biegeleisen Feb 24 '18 at 7:40
  • @TimBiegeleisen Please see my update – Anna.Klee Feb 24 '18 at 7:42
23
1

A comment of the OP on this answer reveals the cause:

I now removed the aux.js and now everything works fine.

AUX is a special file name in Windows (inherited from the old ages of MS-DOS). It is a special file that denotes a device. While on other OSes (Unix-based) the special device files are located in the /dev directory, MS-DOS (and its successor Windows) recognizes the name in any directory and treats it as a special file. This certainly happens in the Command Prompt (for compatibility with the old MS-DOS programs) but it seems it happens in other contexts too.

The name being special and recognized in any directory, the OS code that handles the file names ignores the provided aux.js file (and its path) and handles aux as the special device file AUX. The character case is not important, on Windows file systems aux and Aux are the same as AUX. Because it thinks it has found a special name, it ignores the file extension.

The same thing happens for NUL, CON, PRN and other special names. Check the complete list here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Device_file#MS-DOS

There is no solution for this, only workarounds. If you are stuck on Windows or the project is developed on Windows by coworkers, the only way to circumvent this is to avoid these special names. Aux is probably the short of Auxiliary.
Use longer names.


An interesting reading (and the source of wisdom that provided the information I put into this answer) is this article written by Microsoft senior developer Raymond Chen on his blog "The Old New Thing" in 2003.

| improve this answer | |
  • Wow. If the file were actually named aux I could see why Windows would have a problem, but aux.js ... well, I'll just add this to my huge pile of reasons I refuse to work on Windows. :-) More seriously: how did the file get created in the first place, if Windows keeps thinking aux.js means "device aux"? Maybe it didn't—maybe it's in the index but not the work-tree, and checkout successfully wrote it to the AUX device? – torek Feb 24 '18 at 15:42
  • @torek I wrote the answer based on my memories (and the Wikipedia page I linked into the answer.) Your comment made me doubt and I fired up a Windows 7 computer to check. I was not able to create the file Aux.js using the command prompt. echo 123 > Aux.js produces the error message "The system cannot find the file specified.". Trying to rename an existing file (using ren in Command Prompt) produces "A duplicate file name exists, or the file cannot be found"... – axiac Feb 24 '18 at 15:57
  • Interesting. I know git checkout checks whether it succeeds in creating the output file, because it will spew a bunch of errors at you if you manage to chown a file or subdirectory to root by mistake and then go to check something out when you have no permission to write files. So the initial checkout should have failed. – torek Feb 24 '18 at 15:59
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    ... I created a new file using Windows Explorer then I tried to rename it to Aux.js (using Windows Explorer) and the result was "The specified device name is invalid". I was able, however, to create a file named Aux.js using Cygwin bash (echo 123 > Aux.js). It is immune to any modification using the Command Prompt or Windows Explorer because they "Cannot find this item" when it comes to change it but display it without problems on a directory listing. This is Windows :-( – axiac Feb 24 '18 at 16:01
  • Windows API provides more than one function for files creation. I suspect some of them belong to a backward compatibility layer that handles these special device files. – axiac Feb 24 '18 at 16:04
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Even I was facing the same issue that because Aux is a special name in windows. You can rename Aux file "Auxiliary" which will work un doubtedly.

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