I think char ** mean ppansiChar but i don't know how to use it after and the purpose. I have this function

char **MagickGetImageProfiles(MagickWand *,const char *,size_t *), 

that i translate like this :

function MagickGetImageProfiles(wand: PMagickWand; const pattern: pAnsiChar; const number_profiles: pSize_t): ppAnsiChar;

it's work, however i don't know what to do now with the result as ppansiChar :( why not simple pansiChar ? so maybe i m wrong to use it as ppansichar ? normally MagickGetImageProfiles must return you an array or somethink like this because in number_profiles it's return the number of profiles returned

  • Quite simple: a PPAnsiChar is a pointer to a PAnsiChar. Usually this means there is an array of PAnsiChar and the PPAnsiChar points to the first element of it. If you increment a PAnsiChar, it goes forward by the size of an AnsiChar. If you increment a PPAnsiChar it goes forward by the size of a PAnsiChar. That is why a PPAnsiChar is returned. – Rudy Velthuis Feb 24 at 17:09
up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's a pointer to an array of strings. Personally I'd declare the function like this:

function MagickGetImageProfiles(
    wand: PMagickWand; 
    pattern: pAnsiChar; 
    out number_profiles: size_t
): ppAnsiChar; cdecl;

Call it like this:

var
  i: Integer;
  number_profiles: size_t;
  profiles, p: ppAnsiChar;
... 
profiles := MagickGetImageProfiles(wand, pattern, number_profiles);
// error checking goes here, as described by API documentation 
p := profiles;
for i := 0 to number_profiles-1 do begin
  Writeln(p^);
  Inc(p);
end;
MagickRelinquishMemory(profiles);

You could equally set {$POINTERMATH ON} and write it like this:

var
  i: Integer;
  number_profiles: size_t;
  profiles: ppAnsiChar;
... 
profiles := MagickGetImageProfiles(wand, pattern, number_profiles);
// error checking goes here, as described by API documentation 
p := profiles;
for i := 0 to number_profiles-1 do
  Writeln(profiles[i]);
MagickRelinquishMemory(profiles);
  • thanks, yes it's work like this ! – loki Feb 24 at 8:22
  • BTW did you see Rudy's answer to your environment variable question? – David Heffernan Feb 24 at 8:24
  • yes, @rudyveltuis make a very good example so i don't know, but me i continue to think that in the imagemagick dll the getenvironmentvariable return only the value that was set before the dll was loaded (because the error i receive is only raise after calling getenvironmentvariable when it's return null ... maybe they cache the environment variable or they start another process outside the dll (or even worse cache the exception?), i don't know. but anyway this demonstrate that is always more safe to call setenvironementVariable before to load the DLL. – loki Feb 24 at 14:08
  • No it doesn't demonstrate that at all. That particular dll appears to cache the value of the environment variable. Forcing you to set it before loading. But GetEnvironmentVariable behaves as documented, as I told you. Programming is hard enough without throwing away fact and making things up. – David Heffernan Feb 24 at 14:11
  • when i will have time i will debug this c++ dll to know exactly what is it doing with the environment variable, just to satisfy my curiosity. – loki Feb 24 at 14:16

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.