78

Full disclosure: I'd qualify myself as having intermediate JavaScript knowledge. So this is slightly above my experience level at this time.

I've got a Google Chrome Extension that does an AJAX request for a local file:/// as soon as a page loads. After I get the response back from the request I use the returned code in several functions later on in my code. Most of the time I get the response back before my code that needs it runs. But sometimes I don't and everything breaks.

Now, I assume I could just throw all of the relevant code inside of the xhr.onload below. But that seems really inefficient? I have a lot of moving parts that rely on the response and it seems bad to put them all in there.

I've perused several articles related to async/await and I'm having trouble grasping the concept. I'm also not 100% positive I'm looking at this the right way. Should I even be considering using async/await?

Here is the code for my AJAX request.

  var xhr = new XMLHttpRequest();
  xhr.open("GET", url, true);
  xhr.onload = function(e) {
    code = xhr.response;
  };
  xhr.onerror = function () {
    console.error("** An error occurred during the XMLHttpRequest");
  };
  xhr.send();

Let's say I've got a bunch of functions that need to fire afterwards later on in my code. Right now they just look like:

function doTheThing(code) {
  // I hope the response is ready.
}

What's the best way to approach this? FYI, the Fetch API isn't an option.

Here's a high level view of how my code is structured.

// AJAX request begins.

// ...

// A whole bunch of synchronous code that isn't dependant on 
// the results of my AJAX request. (eg. Creating and appending
// some new DOM nodes, calculating some variables) I don't want
// to wait for the AJAX response when I could be building this stuff instead.

// ...

// Some synchronous code that is dependant on both my AJAX 
// request and the previous synchronous code being complete.

// ...

// Some more synchronous code that needs the above line to 
// be complete.
8
  • 2
    Have you considered using Fetch instead? It's Promise-based from the start.
    – E. Sundin
    Feb 25, 2018 at 1:53
  • 1
    Putting code into a callback has absolutely no bearing on efficiency or performance. It's just code, and a callback is just a callback. The code is either performant or not.
    – Pointy
    Feb 25, 2018 at 1:54
  • 1
    to use XMLHttpRequest with async/await, you'll need to make a Promise Feb 25, 2018 at 1:56
  • 2
    Just call doTheThing(code) from inside the onload function.
    – 4castle
    Feb 25, 2018 at 1:57
  • 1
    async and await are syntactic sugar intended to make coding around Promise APIs simpler and cleaner. They have no performance impact; however a Promise-based API behaves, it behaves the same way when used via async and await.
    – Pointy
    Feb 25, 2018 at 2:18

5 Answers 5

92

I usually do async/await like this:

async function doAjaxThings() {
    // await code here
    let result = await makeRequest("GET", url);
    // code below here will only execute when await makeRequest() finished loading
    console.log(result);
}
document.addEventListener("DOMContentLoaded", function () {
    doAjaxThings();
    // create and manipulate your DOM here. doAjaxThings() will run asynchronously and not block your DOM rendering
    document.createElement("...");
    document.getElementById("...").addEventListener(...);
});

Promisified xhr function here:

function makeRequest(method, url) {
    return new Promise(function (resolve, reject) {
        let xhr = new XMLHttpRequest();
        xhr.open(method, url);
        xhr.onload = function () {
            if (this.status >= 200 && this.status < 300) {
                resolve(xhr.response);
            } else {
                reject({
                    status: this.status,
                    statusText: xhr.statusText
                });
            }
        };
        xhr.onerror = function () {
            reject({
                status: this.status,
                statusText: xhr.statusText
            });
        };
        xhr.send();
    });
}
8
  • Uncaught SyntaxError: await is only valid in async function
    – jkupczak
    Feb 25, 2018 at 2:15
  • Like what it says, you need to put any await on async function. Just add async before the function text. async function doTheThing(code) { let result = await makeRequest("GET", url); console.log(result); } Feb 25, 2018 at 2:17
  • Thanks for the explanation. I've edited my question above to give a brief high level view of how my code is currently structured. Would you still recommend your answer to me based on that?
    – jkupczak
    Feb 25, 2018 at 2:57
  • I just updated my example. But if you want your 2 or more independent tasks to run in parallel (asynchronously), and run some other code only after all the tasks is done, check out Promise.all(). developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… Feb 25, 2018 at 3:55
  • 5
    @ThắngTrầnXuân If I could upvote your answer every day, I would!!! You have just ended the most frustrating development session I have experienced in years! Thank you! Thank you! Thank you! Jun 26, 2019 at 7:56
32

I create a promise for the XHR. Then simply use await inside an async function to call it.

function getHTML(url) {
    return new Promise(function (resolve, reject) {
        var xhr = new XMLHttpRequest();
        xhr.open('get', url, true);
        xhr.responseType = 'document';
        xhr.onload = function () {
            var status = xhr.status;
            if (status == 200) {
                resolve(xhr.response.documentElement.innerHTML);
            } else {
                reject(status);
            }
        };
        xhr.send();
    });
}

async function schemaPageHandler(){
    try {
        var parser = new window.DOMParser();
        var remoteCode = await getHTML('https://schema.org/docs/full.html');
        var sourceDoc = parser.parseFromString(remoteCode, 'text/html');
        var thingList = sourceDoc.getElementById("C.Thing");
        document.getElementById("structured-data-types").appendChild(thingList);
    } catch(error) {
        console.log("Error fetching remote HTML: ", error);
    }              
}
2
  • thanks for the comprehensive example. I am not so sure about the reject() inside onload method. What is for sure, if you really want to handle all errors there should be onerror handler. But I didn't find definitive answer for if onload is fired for cases other than those ending with 2xx status (OK). There are tests saying that it does not happen, but on the other hand in first example in this docs, they do check status
    – papo
    Dec 15, 2019 at 4:30
  • Why using DOMParser here? When you used xhr.responseType = 'document'; the xhr.response is already of type HTMLDocument. If you instead resolve with resolve(xhr.response) then you'll get directly what you're now getting to sourceDoc Seems to me now you're DOM parsing in XHR then stringifying (innerHTML) the result and again DOM parsing it. Or am I missing something?
    – papo
    Dec 16, 2019 at 18:58
17

You get two options,

first is to use newer fetch api which is promise based, with with you can do

let response = await fetch(url);
response = await response.json();; // or text etc..
// do what you wanna do with response

Other option if you really want to use XMLHttpRequest is to promisify it

let response = await new Promise(resolve => {
   var xhr = new XMLHttpRequest();
   xhr.open("GET", url, true);
   xhr.onload = function(e) {
     resolve(xhr.response);
   };
   xhr.onerror = function () {
     resolve(undefined);
     console.error("** An error occurred during the XMLHttpRequest");
   };
   xhr.send();
}) 
// do what you wanna do with response

possible full solution

(async () => {
   let response = await new Promise(resolve => {
      var xhr = new XMLHttpRequest();
      xhr.open("GET", url, true);
      xhr.onload = function(e) {
        resolve(xhr.response);
      };
      xhr.onerror = function () {
        resolve(undefined);
        console.error("** An error occurred during the XMLHttpRequest");
      };
      xhr.send();
   }) 
   doTheThing(response)
})()
7
  • Thanks for the answer. Unfortunately, fetch doesn't allow file:/// which is what I need. I'll try your XMLHttpRequest option and see if that works out for me.
    – jkupczak
    Feb 25, 2018 at 2:05
  • I'm getting this error Uncaught SyntaxError: await is only valid in async function
    – jkupczak
    Feb 25, 2018 at 2:08
  • @jkupczak you need to have this bits inside an async function eg: async function fn () {}, if you are doing this in the top level, you can put the code into a async IIFE (async function fn() {})()
    – Jiby Jose
    Feb 25, 2018 at 2:11
  • When you say // do what you wanna do with response, how do I do that? I've got a function later on that I only want to fire once the response comes back. I don't know how to code that.
    – jkupczak
    Feb 25, 2018 at 2:19
  • @jkupczak when i write // do what you wanna do with response, the response is already there, you can just call your function there, for example, replace // do what you wanna do with response with doTheThing(response)
    – Jiby Jose
    Feb 25, 2018 at 2:21
3

I had the same problem and solved it using the following function:

const makeRequest = (method, url, data = {}) => {
  const xhr = new XMLHttpRequest();
  return new Promise(resolve => {
    xhr.open(method, url, true);
    xhr.onload = () => resolve({
      status: xhr.status,
      response: xhr.responseText
    });
    xhr.onerror = () => resolve({
      status: xhr.status,
      response: xhr.responseText
    });
    if (method != 'GET') xhr.setRequestHeader('Content-Type', 'application/json');
    data != {} ? xhr.send(JSON.stringify(data)) : xhr.send();
  })
}

const test = async() => {
  console.log("Starting request ...")
  let request = await makeRequest("GET", "https://jsonplaceholder.typicode.com/todos/1");
  console.log("status:", request.status)
  console.log("response:", request.response)
}
test()

1

You can for example create an asynchronous class to use instead of the original one. It lacks some methods but it can serve as an example.

(function() {
    "use strict";
    
    var xhr = Symbol();
    
    class XMLHttpRequestAsync {
        constructor() {
            this[xhr] = new XMLHttpRequest();
        }
        open(method, url, username, password) {
            this[xhr].open(method, url, true, username, password);
        }
        send(data) {
            var sxhr = this[xhr];
            return new Promise(function(resolve, reject) {
                var errorCallback;
                var loadCallback;
                
                function cleanup()  {
                    sxhr.removeEventListener("load", loadCallback);
                    sxhr.removeEventListener("error", errorCallback);
                }
                
                errorCallback = function(err) {
                    cleanup();
                    reject(err);
                };
                
                loadCallback = function() {
                    resolve(xhr.response);
                };
                
                
                sxhr.addEventListener("load", loadCallback);
                sxhr.addEventListener("error", errorCallback);
                
                
                sxhr.addEventListener("load", function load() {
                    sxhr.removeEventListener("load", load);
                    resolve(sxhr.response);
                });
                sxhr.send(data);
            });
        }
        set responseType(value)
        {
            this[xhr].responseType = value;
        }
        setRequestHeader(header, value) {
            this[xhr].setRequestHeader(header, value);
        }
    }
    
    addEventListener("load", async function main() {
        removeEventListener("load", main);


        var xhra = new XMLHttpRequestAsync();
        xhra.responseType = "json";
        xhra.open("GET", "appserver/main.php/" + window.location.hash.substring(1));
        console.log(await xhra.send(null));
        
    });
    
}());

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