2

I'm trying to sort a vector of items. As mentioned in the code comments, the ordering should be:

Participants with more action points (mAp) go first. When there is a tie, participants with the same disposition (mDisposition) as the initiator of the battle (mBattleInitiator) go first.

The following code (simplified example) crashes on macOS, presumably due to my sort implementation being incorrect:

#include <QtCore>

class AiComponent
{
public:
    enum Disposition {
        Friendly,
        Hostile
    };

    AiComponent(Disposition disposition) : mDisposition(disposition) {}
    ~AiComponent() { qDebug() << "Destroying AiComponent"; }

    Disposition mDisposition;
};

class BattleManager
{
public:
    BattleManager() : mBattleInitiator(AiComponent::Hostile) {}

    class Turn {
    public:
        Turn() : mAp(1) {}

        Turn(QSharedPointer<AiComponent> aiComponent) :
            mAiComponent(aiComponent),
            mAp(1)
        {
        }

        Turn(const Turn &rhs) :
            mAiComponent(rhs.mAiComponent),
            mAp(1)
        {
        }

        QSharedPointer<AiComponent> mAiComponent;
        int mAp;
    };

    void addToTurnQueue(QSet<QSharedPointer<AiComponent>> aiComponents);

    AiComponent::Disposition mBattleInitiator;
    QVector<Turn> mTurnQueue;
    Turn mActive;
};

void BattleManager::addToTurnQueue(QSet<QSharedPointer<AiComponent> > aiComponents)
{
    foreach (auto aiComponent, aiComponents) {
        mTurnQueue.append(Turn(aiComponent));
    }

    // Sort the participants so that ones with more action points (mAp) go first.
    // When there is a tie, participants with the same disposition (mDisposition)
    // as the initiator of the battle (mBattleInitiator) go first.
    std::sort(mTurnQueue.begin(), mTurnQueue.end(), [=](const Turn &a, const Turn &b) {
        if (a.mAp > b.mAp)
            return true;

        if (a.mAp < b.mAp)
            return false;

        // At this point, a.mAp is equal to b.mAp, so we must resolve the tie
        // based on mDisposition.
        if (a.mAiComponent->mDisposition == mBattleInitiator)
            return true;

        if (b.mAiComponent->mDisposition == mBattleInitiator)
            return false;

        return false;
    });
}

int main(int /*argc*/, char */*argv*/[])
{
    BattleManager battleManager;

    for (int i = 0; i < 20; ++i) {
        qDebug() << "iteration" << i;

        QSet<QSharedPointer<AiComponent>> participants;

        AiComponent::Disposition disposition = i % 2 == 0 ? AiComponent::Hostile : AiComponent::Friendly;
        QSharedPointer<AiComponent> ai(new AiComponent(disposition));
        participants.insert(ai);

        battleManager.addToTurnQueue(participants);
    }

    // This should print (1 1), (1 1), ... (1 0), (1 0)
    foreach (auto turn, battleManager.mTurnQueue) {
        qDebug() << "(" << turn.mAp << turn.mAiComponent->mDisposition << ")";
    }

    return 0;
}

I've looked into other answers on the topic. Most of them just say "implement it as a > b", which won't work in my case. There are a few that seem relevant but don't help me:

What is the simplest way to achieve what I'm after?

8
  • You need to implement strict weak ordering. No way around this. How you do that is up to you. Feb 25, 2018 at 9:47
  • As I understand it, strict weak ordering means that I can't resolve ties. If my understanding is correct, then it's not an option for me. If my understanding is not correct, please provide an answer that states this, along with a simple code example that resolves ties.
    – Mitch
    Feb 25, 2018 at 9:55
  • You can resolve ties if the tie resolver also follows a strict weak ordering. See for example what is done for lexicographical sorting (e.g. sorting strings alphabetically) Feb 25, 2018 at 10:00
  • You need to implement strict weak ordering on 2-tuple. See stackoverflow.com/q/979759/72178.
    – ks1322
    Feb 25, 2018 at 10:01
  • 2
    Resolving ties correctly means they have to implement strict weak ordering of their own. If you have special elements that should go before non-special ones, then if (element a is special and element b is not special) return true; else return false; Feb 25, 2018 at 10:07

2 Answers 2

5

The reason for the crash hasn't been explained yet. Most implementations of std::sort are based on quick sort, specifically Hoare partition scheme, which scans an array from left towards the right as long as element values < pivot values, and scans the array from right towards the left as long as element values > pivot values. These scans are counting on the fact that finding an element value = pivot value will stop a scan, so there's no check for scanning beyond the boundaries of an array. If the user supplied less than compare function returns true in the case of equal elements, then either of the scans may go beyond the array boundaries and cause a crash.

In the case of a debug build, testing of the user compare function may be done to ensure that the compare is less than and not less than or equal, but for a release build, the goal is speed, so these checks are not performed.

1
  • Here a take on creating automatic tool for detection of bugs in sorting callbacks (only supports qsort atm but std::sort is quite double).
    – yugr
    Oct 21, 2018 at 13:23
3

I'll just go off of the comment in your code and explain what's wrong with it (if anything), and how you would fix it.

// Sort the participants so that ones with more action points (mAp) go first.

Good so far

// When there is a tie, participants with the same disposition (mDisposition) as the initiator of the battle (mBattleInitiator) go first.

What if both participants have the same disposition as the initiator? Even if you can guarantee that no 2 elements will satisfy this condition, the sort algorithm is allowed to compare an element against itself. This test would return true in that case, violating one of the conditions of a strict-weak ordering, which is that an element must compare equal to itself (i.e. compare(a,a) must always be false).

Perhaps instead you want to say that if a has the same disposition as the initiator, and b does not, then a should be considered less than b. This can be encoded as:

return dispositionOfA == mBattleInitiator && dispsitionOfB != mBattleInitiator;

So your full test would look like this:

if (a.mAp > b.mAp)
    return true;
if (a.mAp < b.mAp)
    return false;

return a.mAiComponent->mDisposition == mBattleInitiator &&
       b.mAiComponent->mDisposition != mBattleInitiator;
2
  • Thanks! This is a great answer, because it explains exactly what I was missing and how to fix it. Would you mind briefly describing the other conditions of a strict-weak ordering (or just providing a link to a page that does)?
    – Mitch
    Feb 25, 2018 at 10:33
  • For qsort automatic detector of violations is available here (std::sort equivalent is doable so let me know if it's needed).
    – yugr
    Oct 21, 2018 at 13:24

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