50

I recently came across a Microsoft Interview Question for Software Engineer.

Given an array of positive and negative integers, re-arrange it so that you have positive integers on one end and negative integers on other, but retain their order of appearance in the original array.

For example, given [1, 7, -5, 9, -12, 15]
The answer would be: [-5, -12, 1, 7, 9, 15]

This should be done in O(n) time complexity and O(1) space complexity.

We could easily do it in O(n) time complexity, but I am not able to think how we can maintain the order of elements as in original array. If we forget about O(n) complexity, could someone tell me how we can preserve the order of elements without taking into consideration the space- and time-complexity.

17
  • 1
    Guys i think instead of arrays can we use linked list data structure to achieve O(n) and O(1). Commented Feb 4, 2011 at 12:37
  • 1
    @Yochai: Why do you say that it is impossible to sort that way in O(n) time and O(1) space using an array ?
    – gusbro
    Commented Feb 4, 2011 at 15:29
  • 1
    You have 2 sets of information. 1 is the order they are in, and 2 is positive\negative . So if you want to sort it, you either need more than O(n) computation time, or a database that can represent the 2 datasets. Commented Feb 4, 2011 at 16:22
  • 1
    @Yochai: why is this an nlogn problem? Commented Feb 4, 2011 at 17:02
  • 2
    Please add lower bound proofs as answers so I can downvote the incorrect ones ;-) (Since there is an algorithm with O(n), any claims of a lower bound of n log n are wrong.)
    – meriton
    Commented Feb 5, 2011 at 1:25

30 Answers 30

14

To achieve this result in constant space (but quadratic time), you can use the two-queue approach by placing one queue at each end of the array (similar to the Dutch National Flag algorithm). Read items left-to-right : adding an item to the left queue means leaving it alone, adding an item to the right queue means shifting all elements not in a queue to the left by one and placing the added item at the end. Then, to concatenate the queues, simply reverse the order of elements in the second queue.

This performs an O(n) operation (shifting elements left) up to O(n) times, which yields an O(n²) running time.

By using a method similar to merge sort, you can achieve a lower O(n log n) complexity: slice the array in two halves, recursively sort them in the form [N P] [N P] then swap the first P with the second N in O(n) time (it gets a bit tricky when they don't have exactly the same size, but it's still linear).

I have absolutely no idea of how to get this down to O(n) time.

EDIT: actually, your linked list insight is right. If the data is provided as a doubly linked list, you can implement the two-queue strategy in O(n) time, O(1) space:

sort(list):
  negative = empty
  positive = empty
  while (list != empty)
     first = pop(list)
     if (first > 0) 
         append(positive,first)
     else
         append(negative,first)
  return concatenate(negative,positive)

With a linked list implementation that keeps pointers to the first and last elements, then pop, append and concatenate are all O(1) operations, so the total complexity is O(n). As for space, none of the operations allocate any memory (append merely uses the memory released by pop), so it's O(1) overall.

4
  • 1
    What is list? It looks like you're building a new list with the required properties, but you're supposed to change the original array. If you're doing this, it's not O(1) space.
    – IVlad
    Commented Feb 4, 2011 at 12:54
  • IVIad : changed the wording for clarification. I mean to say that if the original data is represented as a linked list, then that is possible. It would be interesting to know if the mention of arrays in the question is present in the original interview question or merely an artifact of being reworded by yogi15490. Commented Feb 4, 2011 at 13:00
  • 3
    Well, I hope it's an array :). It's way too easy if you're given a linked list. I think we should assume an array until the OP clarifies. Besides, I think the words "rearrange it" makes it unlikely the OP added arrays himself.
    – IVlad
    Commented Feb 4, 2011 at 13:06
  • Your merge sort implementation uses log(n) space for the stack. Commented Apr 16, 2015 at 2:36
10

Here is a constriant version of O(n) time O(1) space solution, it assume maxValue*(maxValue+1) is less than Integer.MAX_VALUE, where maxValue is the result of maxmum value minus minmum value in the array. It utilize the original array as the temporary array to store the result.

public static void specialSort(int[] A){
    int min = Integer.MAX_VALUE, max = Integer.MIN_VALUE;
    for(int i=0; i<A.length; i++){
        if(A[i] > max)
            max = A[i];
        if(A[i] < min)
            min = A[i];
    }
    //Change all values to Positive
    for(int i=0; i<A.length; i++)
        A[i]-= min;

    int newMax = max-min+1;

    //Save original negative values into new positions
    int currNegativeIndex = 0;
    for(int i=0; i<A.length; i++)
        if(A[i]%newMax < (-min))
            A[currNegativeIndex++] += (A[i]%newMax)*newMax;
    //Save original positive values into new positions
    int currPositiveIndex = currNegativeIndex;
    for(int i=0; i<A.length; i++)
        if(A[i]%newMax > (-min))
            A[currPositiveIndex++] += (A[i]%newMax)*newMax;
    //Recover to original value 
    for(int i=0; i<A.length; i++){
        A[i] = A[i]/newMax + min; 
    }
}
8
  • could you please elaborate your answer? It seems nice, but I cannot understand the logic.
    – Hengameh
    Commented May 16, 2015 at 2:27
  • especially this part: int min = Integer.MAX_VALUE, max = Integer.MIN_VALUE; why you choose MAX as min, and MIN as max?
    – Hengameh
    Commented May 16, 2015 at 2:31
  • Can you please explain the logic especially where you are doing "Save original values to the new positions"
    – novieq
    Commented May 23, 2016 at 10:51
  • A similar problem can be found here. This is nothing but, you're trying to store two numbers in one element by converting it to base newMax (after adjusting the range to [0, newMax] from [min, max]).
    – azam
    Commented Aug 9, 2016 at 20:30
  • 1
    @Hengameh when you want to find a maximum in an array, you chose the initial maximum as INT_MIN so that it could be replaced by any first number you find. Logic: This is a GREAT answer. He's basically utilising the same array (where normal solution would be to use a second empty array of size n) to store the negative and positive elements thus reducing the space to O(1). He cleverly ADDS all the negative number in the first half and all the positive numbers in the second half using modulo (of the maximum number in the array + 1) and later retrieves the origin values through division. Commented Feb 14, 2017 at 17:46
6

I'm not sure I understand the question correctly, as the answer appears to be too simple:

  • Walk through the array and count negative numbers - O(n)
  • Create a new array of size O(n)
  • Walk through original array and place numbers into the new array. Use the known number of negative numbers to offset the positive ones - O(n)

Here's a quick way to do it in Python. It slightly differs from the above in first creating an array for the negatives, then appending the positives. So it's not as efficient, but still O(n).

>>> a = [1,7,-5,9,-12,15]
>>> print [x for x in a if x < 0] + [y for y in a if y >= 0]
[-5, -12, 1, 7, 9, 15]

Edit: Ok, now with O(1) space compexity it gets much harder. I'm interested in how to achieve it in O(n) time complexity, too. If it helps, here's a way to keep the O(1) space complexity, but requires O(n^2) time complexity:

  • Start from the leftmost negative number. Walk through the array until you find the next negative number.
  • In a new loop, exchange the negative number with the positive number left of it. Do this until you reach the other negative numbers. This ensures the order of the numbers remains unchanged.
  • Rince and repeat until you reach the end of the array when looking for a new negative number.
3
  • 1
    I too found this question easy but I haven't mentioned in above question that you are also suppose to have O(1) space complexity So that first i may come to know how to maintain the order of elements. Commented Feb 4, 2011 at 11:10
  • @Frank can you or someone explain your steps with more details. I am confused as to how the negative integers actually make up to the start of the array? [1,7,-5,9,-12,15] will end up as [1,-5,7,-12,9,15] if we look for negative numbers and start swapping them with the positive integer on their left? Am I missing something here? Commented Nov 19, 2014 at 19:51
  • @james2611nov: keep in mind the loop I mentioned in the second step. You don't just swap -5 and 7, but in the same loop you also swap -5 and 1. So you sort of bubble the negative number to the left until hitting another negative number of the end of the array. You would get [-5,1,7,9,-12,15] after the first run of that second step.
    – Frank
    Commented Nov 20, 2014 at 6:07
5

It can be done in O(n) and space O(1).

We need to scan 3 times through the array and change some values carefully.

Assumption: the max value in the array with size N is should be smaller than (N+1) * Integer.MAX_VALUE.

We need this assumption since we well change some positive values in the array.

  • In the first scan, find # of negative and positive values, and the max.
  • In the second scan we create the negative section of array as follows:

We start from the beginning of the array and we "swap" the first found positive number (e.g. at index i) with the first found negative number (e.g. j). Since negative numbers are being considered with respect to their location, the swap will be okay.

The problem is the positive numbers because there might be some other positive numbers between i and j. To handle this issue, we have to somehow encode the index of the positive number in that value before swapping. So then we can realize where it was at the first point. We can do this by a[i]=(i+1)*(max)+a[i].

  • In the third scan, we create the positive section of array. by end of the second scan, the negative array is constructed, and the positive numbers are shifted to the right side, but their location may not be correct. So we go though it and correct their position since this info was encoded their value.

Here is the code:

import java.util.Arrays;

public class LinearShifting {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        int[] a = {-1,7,3,-5,4,-3,1,2};
        sort(a);
        System.out.println(Arrays.toString(a));  //output: [-1, -5, -3, 7, 3, 4, 1, 2]
    }
    public static void sort(int[] a){
        int pos = 0;
        int neg = 0;
        int i,j;
        int max = Integer.MIN_VALUE;
        for(i=0; i<a.length; i++){
            if(a[i]<0) neg++;
            else pos++;
            if(a[i]>max) max = a[i];
        }
        max++;
        if(neg==0 || pos == 0) return;//already sorted
        i=0;
        j=1;
        while(true){
            while(i<=neg && a[i]<0) i++;
            while(j<a.length && a[j]>=0) j++;
            if(i>neg || j>=a.length) break;
            a[i]+= max*(i+1);
            swap(a,i,j);
        }

        i = a.length-1;
        while(i>=neg){
            int div = a[i]/max;
            if(div == 0) i--;
            else{
                a[i]%=max;
                swap(a,i,neg+div-2);// minus 2 since a[i]+= max*(i+1);
            }
        }

    }
    private static void swap(int[] a, int i , int j){
        int t = a[i];
        a[i] = a[j];
        a[j] = t;
    }

}
2
  • please note that the only postive number that are swapped are those that were in the section that belongs to negative numbers. the rest of positive numbers will not be touched util round 3.
    – mehraz
    Commented Dec 17, 2015 at 0:19
  • This algorithm seems to have a flaw. For example, for array [ 1, -2, 2, -4, 3], max is 3, incremented to 4. The first swap i = 0, j = 1, array become [-2, 1, 2, -4, 3], then [-2, 5, 2, -4, 3]. 1 was changed to 5 by max(0+1)+1. But then the second swap, i = 1, j = 3, array[1]:5 is still the first positive, and will get decoded again. Commented Apr 30, 2016 at 4:45
3

Edit (5/29/2015): I overlooked the requirement for maintaining order of appearance, so the answer below does not satisfy all of the requirements of the question. However, I leave the original response up for general interest.


This is a special version of a very important subroutine of quicksort known as "partition." Definition: an array A having N numeric entries is partitioned about value K at index p if A[i] < K for 0 <= i < p and A[j] >= K for p <= j < N, unless all the entries are less than K (meaning p = N) or not less than K (meaning p = 0). For the problem in question, we will partition the array around K = 0.

You can partition an unsorted array about any value K in O(n) time, accessing each entry in the array just once, using O(1) additional memory. Informally, you step through the array from both ends, moving values that are on the wrong side. Perform a swap when one misplaced value is found on each side of the array, then continuing stepping inward. Now the C++ code:

// Assume array A[] has size N
int K = 0; // For particular example partitioning positive and negative numbers
int i = 0, j = N-1; // position markers, start at first and last entries
while(1) { // Break condition inside loop
    while(i < N && A[i] < K) i++; // Increase i until A[i] >= K
    while(j >= 0 && A[j] >= K) j--; // Decrease j until A[j] < K
    if(i < j) 
        swap(A[i],A[j]);
    else
        break;
}
// A[] is now partitioned, A[0]...A[j] < K, unless i==0 (meaning all entries >= K).

Note that if all elements are equal to K (zero in this case), i is never incremented and j = 0 at the end. The problem statement assumes this will never happen. Partition is very fast and efficient, and this efficiency is the reason why quicksort is the most popular sorting routine for large arrays. The swap function can be std::swap in C++ or you can easily write your own:

void swap(int& a, int& b) {
    int temp = a;
    a = b;
    b = temp;
}

Or just for fun, numbers can be swapped in place with no temporary memory, though be mindful of overflow:

// This code swaps a and b with no extra space.  Watch out for overflow!
a -= b;
b += a;
a = b - a;

There are many variations to partition for special cases, such as a three way partition for [elements < K] [elements == K] [elements > K]. The quicksort algorithm calls partition recursively, and the partition value K is usually the first entry in the current sub-array or computed from a few entries (such as median of three). See textbooks: Algorithms by Sedgewick and Wayne (4th ed., p. 288) or The Art of Computer Programming Vol. 3 by Knuth (2nd ed., p. 113).

2
  • does partition function preserve the order of element's appearance?
    – Hengameh
    Commented May 15, 2015 at 4:40
  • 1
    @Hengameh : No, partition is not a stable reordering operation, and quicksort is not a stable sort. Note in the code above that the partition process works from both sides of the array, and it swaps two elements that are "on the wrong side" of a pivot value. Where the pivot point is located in the final partitioned array is not known until the very end. Because the pointers into the array are moving in opposite directions, order is not preserved when a swap occurs.
    – qArchitect
    Commented May 29, 2015 at 16:52
3

This solution has O(n) time complexity and O(1) space complexity

Idea is:

  1. keep track of index of last seen negative element (lastNegIndex).

  2. loop through the array to find negative elements that are preceded by positive element.

  3. If such element is found, right rotate elements between lastNegIndex and current Index by one. Then update lastNegIndex (it will be next index).

Here is the code:

public void rightRotate(int[] a, int n, int currentIndex, int lastNegIndex){
    int temp = a[currentIndex];
    for(int i = currentIndex; i > lastNegIndex+ 1; i--){
        a[i] = a[i-1];
    }
    a[lastNegIndex+1] = temp;
}

public void ReArrange(int[] a, int n){
    int lastNegIndex= -1;
    int index;

    if(a[0] < 0)
        lastNegIndex = 0;

    for(index = 1; index < n; index++){
         if (a[index] < 0 && a[index - 1] >= 0) {
             rightRotate(a, n, index, lastNegIndex);
             lastNegIndex = lastNegIndex + 1;
         }
    }
}
1
  • There should be an added condition, that if a negative number is found within the loop that is preceded by another negative number (instead of a positive number which requires a rotation to follow), lastNegIndex should increase by 1.. Commented Apr 14, 2016 at 0:50
2

You can use 2 queues and merge them. That way, you only iterate once on the first array and once each sub queue.

negatives = []
positives = []

for elem in array:
  if elem >= 0:
    positives.push(elem)
  else
    negatives.push(elem)

result = array(negatives, positives)
1
  • 1
    This is not O(1) memory complexity... When you push an item it will make a copy of it, you'll copy the whole array again and get O(n) memory complexity. Commented Feb 4, 2011 at 19:15
2

Here's a solution with only 2 iterations:
Let's say the length is n.
And i'll use C like code, ignore syntax errors.

solution[n];
for (i= 0,j=0 ; i < n ; i++ ) {
     if (array[i] < 0) solution[j++] = array[i];
}
for (i = n-1,j=n-1 ; ; i > 0 ; i--) {
     if (array[i] >= 0) solution[j--] = array[i];
}

The idea is to go over it once, and write all the negatives we encounter.
Then go over it the second time from the end, and write the positives from the end towards the beginning.

2
  • thanks for your answer.can we solve this problem in O(1) space complexity. Commented Feb 4, 2011 at 11:33
  • It's not possible if you've only got an array. Commented Feb 4, 2011 at 17:12
1

If the structure in the beginning doesn't have to be an array, it's even simpler.

If you have the original numbers in a linked list it's easy.

You can re-arrange the linked list, just each time point the negative's next to the next negative, and the positive's next to the next positive.

Again C like code, ignore syntax. (might need a null check here and there, but this is the idea)

Cell firstPositive;
Cell* lastPoisitive;
lastPoisitive = &firstPositive;
Cell firstNegative;
Cell* lastNegative;
lastNegative = &firstNegative;
Cell* iterator;
for(Iterator = list.first ; Iterator != null ; Iterator = Iterator->next) {
   if (Iterator->value > 0 ) lastPoisitive->next = Iterator;
   else lastPoisitive->next = Iterator;
}
list.first = firstNegative->next;
list.last.next = firstPositive->next;
1

Just an idea.. Let's consider a simplier problem:

Given an array, where first part (Np elements) contains only positive numbers, and last part (Nn elements): only negative ones. How to swap these parts while mainaning the relative order?

Simpliest solution is to use inversion:

inverse(array, Np + Nn); // whole array
inverse(array, Nn);      // first part
inverse(array+Nn, Np);   // second part

It has O(n) time complexity and O(1) space complexity.

1

If the goal is O(1) space (besides the elements themselves, which are assumed to be freely mutable) and O(NlgN) time, divide the problem into that of arranging arrays that are known to be of the form pnPN, where p and P represents zero or more positive numbers and n and N represents 0 or more negative numbers, into arrays of the form pPnN. Any two-element array will automatically be of that form. Given two arrays of that form, locate the first negative number, next positive number, and last positive number, and "spin" the middle two sections of the array (easy to do in constant space, and time proportional to the size of the array to be 'spun'). The result will be an array of the form pPnN. Two consecutive such arrays will form a larger array of the form pnPN.

To do things in constant space, start by pairing up all elements and putting them into PN form. Then do all quartets of elements, then all octets, etc. up to the total size of the array.

0
1

I very much doubt if O(n) time and O(1) is feasible with an array. Some suggest linked list, but you will need a custom linked list where you have direct access to the nodes to do this, ie. language-built-in linked lists won't work.

Here's my idea using a custom doubly linked list which satisfy the constrained complexities, using [1, 7, -5, 9, -12, 15] as an example:

Loop through the list, if see a negative, cut it off and add it to the end of the negatives at the front. Each operation is O(1) so total time is O(n). Linked list operations are in-place so O(1) space.

In detail:

last_negative_node = null;

at -5: 

cut off -5 by setting 7.next = 9, 

then add -5 to front by -5.next = 1, 

then update last_negative_node = 5 // O(1), the linked list is now [-5, 1, 7, 9, -12, 15]


at -12: 

cut off -12 by setting 9.next = 15, 

then add -12 to front by -12.next = last_negative_node.next, 

then update last_negative_node.next = -12,

then update last_negative_node = -12 //O(1), the linked list is now [-5, -12, 1, 7, 9, 15]

no more negatives so done.
1

O(n) solution Java

    private static void rearrange(int[] arr) {
    int pos=0,end_pos=-1;
    for (int i=0;i<=arr.length-1;i++){  
        end_pos=i;
        if (arr[i] <=0){
            int temp_ptr=end_pos-1;
            while(end_pos>pos){
                int temp = arr[end_pos];
                arr[end_pos]=arr[temp_ptr];
                arr[temp_ptr]=temp;
                end_pos--;
                temp_ptr--;
            }
            pos++;
        }

    }
1

Here is a JavaScript implementation of qiwangcs's solution:

function specialSort(A){
    let min = Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER, max = -Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER;
    for(let i=0; i<A.length; i++){
        if(A[i] > max)
            max = A[i];
        if(A[i] < min)
            min = A[i];
    }
    //Change all values to Positive
    for(let i=0; i<A.length; i++)
        A[i]-= min;
    const newMax = max-min+1;        
    //Save original negative values into new positions
    let currNegativeIndex = 0;
    for(let i=0; i<A.length; i++)
        if(A[i]%newMax < (-min))
            A[currNegativeIndex++] += (A[i]%newMax)*newMax;
    //Save original positive values into new positions
    let currPositiveIndex = currNegativeIndex;
    for(let i=0; i<A.length; i++)
        if(A[i]%newMax > (-min))
            A[currPositiveIndex++] += (A[i]%newMax)*newMax;
    //Recover to original value 
    for(let i=0; i<A.length; i++){
        A[i] = Math.floor(A[i]/newMax) + min; 
    }
}
// Demo
const A = [-3,-7,2,8,-5,-2,4];
specialSort(A);
console.log(A);

0

I think this would work: Here's a simple way that's constant space (but quadratic time). Say the array is length N. Walk along the array from i = 0 to i = N-2 checking element i and i+1. If element i is positive and element i+1 is negative, swap them. Then repeat that process.

Each pass across the array will make the negatives drift to the left (and positives drift to the right), sort of like a bubble sort, until (after sufficient number of passes) they are all in their correct place.

Also, I think this would work: It's also constant space (but quadratic time). Say P is the number of positives. Scan from left to right, when you find a positive x stop the scan, and "delete it" by shifting all the items after it left by one. Then put x at the end of the array. Repeat procedure scan P times to move every positive.

1
  • what does this mean? "It's also constant space (but quadratic time)"
    – Hengameh
    Commented May 16, 2015 at 3:15
0

First, count the number k of negative elements. Then, you know that the first k numbers of the array (first part of the array) should be negative. The following N - k elements should be positive after sorting the array.

You maintain two counters of how many elements respect those conditions in both parts of the array and increment it at each step until you know that one part is OK (counter is equal to the size of that part). Then the other part is OK too.

This requires O(1) storage and takes O(N) time.

Implementation in C++ :

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

void swap(vector<int>& L, int i, int j) {
    int tmp = L[i];
    L[i] = L[j];
    L[j] = tmp;
}

void signSort(vector<int>& L) {
    int cntNeg = 0, i = 0, j = 0;
    for (vector<int>::iterator it = L.begin(); it < L.end(); ++it) {
        if (*it < 0) ++cntNeg;
    }
    while (i < cntNeg && cntNeg + j < L.size()) {
        if (L[i] >= 0) {
            swap(L, i, cntNeg + j);
            ++j;
        } else {
            ++i;
        }
    }
}

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    vector<int> L;
    L.push_back(-1);
    L.push_back(1);
    L.push_back(3);
    L.push_back(-2);
    L.push_back(2);
    signSort(L);
    for (vector<int>::iterator it = L.begin(); it != L.end(); ++it) {
        cout << *it << endl;
    }
    return 0;
}
2
  • This implementation is very clever. Well done @Thomas
    – thehouse
    Commented Feb 24, 2015 at 23:28
  • 3
    Unfortunately the swap may move a positive number back over other positive numbers. For example: [1, 2, 3, -1, -2] gives [-1, -2, 1, 3, 2]. Commented Apr 16, 2015 at 2:25
0

This code Work with O(n) complexity and O(1) space. No need to declare another array.

#include <stdio.h>

int* sort(int arr[], int size)
{
    int i;
    int countNeg = 0;
    int pos = 0;
    int neg = 0;

    for (i = 0; i < size; i++)
    {
        if (arr[i] < 0)
            pos++;
    }

    while ((pos < (size-1)) || (neg < size-(pos-1)))
    {
        if ((arr[pos] < 0) && (arr[neg] > 0))
        {
            arr[pos] = arr[pos] + arr[neg];
            arr[neg] = arr[pos] - arr[neg];
            arr[pos] = arr[pos] - arr[neg];
            pos++;
            neg++;
            continue;
        }
        if ((arr[pos] < 0) && (arr[neg] < 0))
        {
            neg++;
            continue;
        }
        if ((arr[pos] > 0) && (arr[neg] > 0))
        {
            pos++;
            continue;

        }
        if ((arr[pos] > 0) && (arr[neg] < 0))
        {
            pos++;
            neg++;
            continue;

        }
    }
    return arr;
}

void main()
{
    int arr[] = { 1, 7, -5, 9, -12, 15 };
    int size = sizeof(arr) / sizeof(arr[0]);
    sort(arr, size);
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < size; i++)
    {
        printf("%d ,", arr[i]);
    }
    printf(" \n\n");
}
1
  • 1
    This answer needs an explanation. What does this code offer that the other 16 answers don't? What's different about yours? Why should someone consider doing it this way? Commented May 16, 2015 at 13:39
0
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

void negativeFirst_advanced (int arr[ ], int size)

{

    int count1 =0, count2 =0;

    while(count2<size && count1<size)
{

        if(arr[count1]>0 && arr[count2]<0)
        {       
            int temp = arr[count1];
            arr[count1] = arr[count2];
            arr[count2] = temp;
        }

        if (arr[count1]<0)
            count1++;
        if (arr [count2]>0)
            count2++;

    }
}

int main()
{

        int arr[6] = {1,7,-5,9,-12,15};
        negativeFirst_advanced (arr, 6);
        cout<<"[";
        for (int i =0; i<6;i++)
            cout<<arr[i]<<" , ";
        cout<<"]";

        system("pause");
        return 0;
}
0

Here is my solution in Python, using recursion (I had an assignment like this, where the array should be sorted relatively to a number K. If You put K = 0, You've got Your solution, without retaining the order of appearance):

def kPart(s, k):
    if len(s) == 1:
        return s
    else:
        if s[0] > k:
            return kPart(s[1:], k) + [s[0]]
        else:
            return [s[0]] + kPart(s[1:], k)
0

This is not Complexity O(1) but a simpler approach. Do comment

void divide (int *arr, int len) {
    int positive_entry_seen = 0;                                                                                             
    for (int j = 0; j < len ; j++) { 
        if (arr[j] >= 0 ) { 
            positive_entry_seen = 1;
        } else if ((arr[j] < 0 ) && positive_entry_seen) {
            int t = arr[j];
            int c = j;
            while ((c >= 1) && (arr[c-1] >= 0)) {
                arr[c] = arr[c-1];
                c--;
            }   
            arr[c] = t;
        }   
    }   
}
0

An extremely simple solution is below but not in O(n). I changed the insertion sort algorithm a bit. Instead of checking if a number is greater or smaller, it checks if they are greater or less than zero.

 int main() {

    int arr[] = {1,-2,3,4,-5,1,-9,2};

        int j,temp,size;

        size = 8;
        for (int i = 0; i <size ; i++){
            j = i;  
            //Positive left, negative right
            //To get opposite, change it to: (arr[j] < 0) && (arr[j-1] > 0)
            while ((j > 0) && (arr[j] >0) && (arr[j-1] < 0)){
                  temp = arr[j];
                  arr[j] = arr[j-1];
                  arr[j-1] = temp;
                  j--;
            }
        }

        //Printing
        for(int i=0;i<size;i++){
            cout<<arr[i]<<" ";      
        }
        return 0;
 }
0

A simple and easy solution which works in O(n) time complexity.

    int left = 0;
    int right = arr.length - 1;

    while (left < right) {

        while (arr[left] >= 0) {
            left++;
        }

        while (arr[right] < 0) {
            right--;
        }

        if (left < right) {
            ArrayUtility.swapInArray(arr, left, right);
    }

    ArrayUtility.printArray(arr);
0

This uses partition process of QuickSort. The time complexity of this solution is O(n2) and auxiliary space is O(1). This approach maintains the order of appearance and have not used any other data structure. This is in Ruby

def sortSeg(intArr)
    intArr.each_with_index do |el, idx|
        # if current element is pos do nothing if negative,
        # shift positive elements of arr[0..i-1],
        # to one position to their right */
        if el < 0
            jdx = idx - 1;
            while (jdx >= 0 and intArr[jdx] > 0)
                intArr[jdx + 1] = intArr[jdx];
                jdx = jdx - 1;
            end
            # Insert negative element at its right position
            intArr[jdx + 1] = el;
        end
    end
end
0
int [] input = {1, 7, -5, 9, -12, 15};
int [] output = new int [input.length];
int negativeIdx = 0;
int positiveIdx = input.length - 1;
for(int i = 0; i < input.length ; i++) {
    if(input[i] < 0) {
        output [negativeIdx++] = input[i];
    } else {
        output [positiveIdx--] = input[i];
    }
}
System.out.println

(Arrays.toString(output));

Output:

[-5, -12, 15, 9, 7, 1]
1
  • order of positive numbers is not retained
    – Abhinay
    Commented Aug 31, 2021 at 18:29
-1

This can simply be done by following steps in O(n), without using any extra space

int count = 0;
//data is the array/vector in sort container having given input.
if(data[0] < 0)
    count++;
for(int i = 1; i < n; i++)
{
    if(data[i] < 0)
    {
        int j = i;
        while(j> count)
        {
            data[j-1] += data[j];
            data[j] = (data[j-1]-data[j]);
            data[j-1] -= data[j];
            j--;
        }
        count++;
    }
}

it's complete implementation can be found here https://gist.github.com/Shravan40/8659568

-1

I have hard-coded the values of the array. However it will work any set of integers.

    int[] n={2,-3,1,5,-10,-8};
    int k=0;
    for(int i=1;i<n.length;i++)
    {
        int temp=0;
        if(n[i]<0)
        {
            temp=n[k];
            n[k]=n[i];
            n[i]=temp;
            k++;
        }
    }

        for(int j=0;j<n.length;j++)
    {
        System.out.println(n[j]);
    }
1
  • 1
    Although this code may answer the question, providing additional context regarding why and/or how it answers the question would significantly improve its long-term value. Please edit your answer to add some explanation. Commented May 17, 2016 at 17:23
-1

I hope this helps. This one has Time Complexity O(n^2)

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    int a[] = {-3, 2, -5, 9, -2, -8, 6, 8, -1, 6};

    int length = (sizeof(a) / sizeof(int));
    int i, j = 0;

    printf("Size of array: %d\n", sizeof(a));

    for (i = 0; i < length; i++) {
        if (i % 2 == 0 && a[i] < 0) {
            for (j = i + 1; j < length; j++) {
                if (a[j] > 0) {
                    int t = a[i];
                    a[i] = a[j];
                    a[j] = t;
                    break;
                }
            }
        } else if (i % 2 == 1 && a[i] > 0) {
            for (j = i + 1; j < length; j++) {
                if (a[j] < 0) {
                    int t = a[i];
                    a[i] = a[j];
                    a[j] = t;
                    break;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    for (i = 0; i < length; i++) {
        printf("Value at %d: %d\n", i, a[i]);
    }

    return 0;
}

EDIT 1 This relies on the fact that numbers greater than zero are always at an even index and numbers less than zero are always at odd index

EDIT 2 Improved the code a little

-1

here my answer is two separate positive and negative values in single array it will help you

int[] singleArray= {300, -310, 320, 340, 350,
                -330, 420, 370, -360, 390,
                340, -430, 320, -463, 450}; 
public double[] getPositive_SingleArray() {
            double minValue = 0;
            double positiveValue=0;
            int count=0;
            for (int i = 0; i < singleArrayData.length; i++) {
                if ( singleArrayData[i]>0)
                    count++;
            }
            positiveSingleArrayData=new double[count];
            int k=0;
            for (int i = 0; i < singleArrayData.length; i++) {
                if ( singleArrayData[i]>0){
                positiveSingleArrayData[k] = singleArrayData[i];
                k++;
                }
             }
            System.out.println("single array of positve values "+Arrays.toString(positiveSingleArrayData));
            return positiveSingleArrayData;
        }
1
  • Although this code may answer the question, providing additional context regarding why and/or how it answers the question would significantly improve its long-term value. Please edit your answer to add some explanation. Commented May 17, 2016 at 17:23
-1

I've tried with the bubble sorting method and it works perfectly and it retain their order of appearance in the original array.

int main()
{
    int array[TAM], num, i=0, j=0;

    printf("Ingrese arreglo: ");

    for(i=0; i < TAM -1 && num != 0; i++)
    {
        scanf("%d", &num);
        array[i]=num;
    }

    for(i=0; array[i] != 0 ; i++)
    {
        j++;
    }

    Alternar(array, j);

    //MOSTRAR
    for(i=0; i < j; i++)
    {
        printf("%d ", array[i]);
    }


    return 0;
}

void Alternar(int array[], int j)
{
    int i=0, aux, pasadas=1;

    for(pasadas=1; pasadas < j; pasadas++)
    {
        for(i=0; i < j - pasadas ; i++)
        {
            if(array[i] > 0 && array[i+1] < 0)
            {
                aux = array[i];
                array[i] = array[i+1];
                array[i+1] = aux;
            }
        }
    }

}

1
  • 1
    This question specifically request O(n) time and, optionally, O(1) space, i.e. and in-place sort. You cannot be further away from O(n) with bubble sort.
    – Sheepy
    Commented Dec 16, 2015 at 23:57
-3

Look at Heapsort in the table of sorting algorithms on Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sorting_algorithm

1
  • Heapsort is n lg n, and thus fails the running time requirements. Not that it would make sense anyway, because you want a partial sort, here, not a sort.
    – James
    Commented Aug 23, 2011 at 4:10

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