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Is there any specific reason why has support for designated initializers not been added to g++? Is the reason that C99 standards came late and g++ was developed earlier and later people didn't care about this issue, or there is some inherent difficulty in implementing designated initializers in the grammar of C++?

  • Linux is written in C and not C++. g++ is the frontend for C++, use gcc for C. – Jens Gustedt Feb 4 '11 at 17:13
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    @Bharat Singh: Using C++ in the Linux kernel is a very, very bad idea. Linux lacks all the infrastructure required to make C++ work properly. Linus Torvalds explained this multiple times in detail: kerneltrap.org/node/2067 – datenwolf Feb 4 '11 at 17:37
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    Compile C files with a C compile and C++ files with a C++ compiler. Designated initializers work perfectly well in C but they are not valid in C++. – R.. GitHub STOP HELPING ICE Feb 4 '11 at 18:48
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    I want to know the reason why are they not supported by C++ – Bharat Feb 5 '11 at 4:51
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    Why don't you just compile the C parts of the kernel with the C compiler, your C++ parts with g++, then link together the result? – caf Feb 7 '11 at 2:00
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0

As I noted in a comment, G++ doesn't support C99 standard designated initialisers, but it does support the GNU extension to C90 which allows designated initialisers. So this doesn't work:

union value_t {
    char * v_cp;
    float v_f;
};
union value_t my_val = { .v_f = 3.5f };

But this does:

union value_t my_val = { v_f: 3.5f };

This seems to be a bad interaction of co-ordination between the C and C++ standards committees (there is no particularly good reason why C++ doesn't support the C99 syntax, they just haven't considered it) and GCC politics (C++ shouldn't support C99 syntax just because it's in C99, but it should support GNU extension syntax that achieves exactly the same thing because that's a GNU extension that can be applied to either language).

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    this is no longer true in g++-5.2 and probably going all the way back at least to g++-4.8 – Catskul Oct 7 '16 at 20:00
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    Well, the answer was given in 2012. – Tom Oct 10 '16 at 13:16
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    Yep, sorry, that was meant as a note to readers rather than a correction per se. – Catskul Oct 18 '16 at 19:30
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I ran into this same problem today. g++ with -std=c++11 and c++14 does support designated initializers, but you can still get a compilation error "test.cxx:78:9: sorry, unimplemented: non-trivial designated initializers not supported" if you don't initialize the struct in the order in which it's members have been defined. As an example

struct x
{
    int a;
    int b;
};

// This is correct
struct x x_1 = {.a = 1, .b = 2};
// This will fail to compile with error non-trivial designated initializer
struct x x_2 = {.b = 1, .a = 2};
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    Designated initializers still aren't part of any version of standard C++. – Quentin Jul 22 '16 at 12:47
  • @Quentin Corrected now. – Anirban Mandal Jul 22 '16 at 15:20
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C++ does not support this. It will not even be in the C++0x standards it seems: http://groups.google.com/group/comp.std.c++/browse_thread/thread/8b7331b0879045ad?pli=1

Also, why are you trying to compile the Linux kernel with G++?

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    We have re written some portion of linux kernel in C++, so it is essential for us to use g++ – Bharat Feb 4 '11 at 17:17
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    Wait till Linus hears about it. – rr- Oct 1 '15 at 11:57
1
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As of at least g++-4.8 this is now supported by default.

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1
0

It will be officially supported in C++20, and is already implemented in g++8.2 (even without the std=c++2a flag).

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0
0

What about anonymous unions?

In C I can have this:

struct vardir_entry {
    const uint16_t id;
    const uint8_t sub;
    const char *name;
    const uint8_t type;

    const union {   
        struct vardir_lookup lookup;
        struct vardir_min_max_conf minmax;       
    };

    const union {
        const struct vardir_value_target_const const_value;
        const struct vardir_value_target value;
    };
};

And initialized like this:

static const struct vardir_entry _directory[]{
        { .id = 0xefef, .sub = 0, .name = "test", .type = VAR_UINT32, .minmax = { .min = 0, .max = 1000 }, .value = VARDIR_ENTRY_VALUE(struct obj, &obj, member) }
    };

However under g++ even with c++14 this gives the same "sorry, unimplemented" error. We do need to be able to define C variables in C++ when we at least want to unit test C code with C++ test framework. The fact that such a valuable feature from C is not being supported is quite a shame.

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0

Accoding to http://gcc.gnu.org/c99status.html designated initializers have been already implemented.

What version of g++ do you use? (Try g++ -- version)

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    That's C99, not C++. I don't think every C99 feature is implicitly supported by g++. – Maister Feb 4 '11 at 17:13
  • Maybe you do not use "C mode" – Alexandr Priymak Feb 4 '11 at 17:13
  • The poster wants C99 constructs in C++, which is completely wrong. – Conrad Meyer Feb 5 '11 at 21:06
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    i don't want C99 constructs, i want to know the reason why they are not supported in C++, if there is some valid reason why they are not supported, there would me no point for me spending time in changing gcc. – Bharat Feb 6 '11 at 5:40
  • Put very simply, C and C++ are two different languages with different standards. Mostly the C++ standard includes everything in the C standard, but designated initialisers is one thing that is in the C99 standard but not any of the C++ standards. So G++ correctly implements the C++ standard by not including designated initialisers. – Tom Jan 30 '12 at 11:01

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