2

I have a file filename with 2 lines:

2018-Feb-22 06:02:01.1234|AVC-00123HHGF|427654|Default|Name1 [1]|2334|2344444|(00:00:00.45567)|
2018-Feb-22 07:02:01.1234|BCV-00123HHGF|427654|Default|Name1 [1]|2334|2344444|(00:00:00.45567)|

I want to concat string

"Warning: Time elapsed:,3444, is smaller than Name2:44222"

At the end of the line which is equal with

Var1="2018-Feb-22 06:02:01.1234|AVC-00123HHGF|427654|Default|Name1 [1]|2334|2344444|(00:00:00.45567)|"

Or has the following pattern Var2="2018-Feb-22 06:02:01.1234|AVC-00123HHGF|"

And then filename will contain

 2018-Feb-22 06:02:01.1234|AVC-00123HHGF|427654|Default|Name1 [1]|2334|2344444|(00:00:00.45567)|"Warning: Time elapsed:,3444, is smaller than Name2:44222"
 2018-Feb-22 07:02:01.1234|BCV-00123HHGF|427654|Default|Name1 [1]|2334|2344444|(00:00:00.45567)|

This is what i've tried:

Var3='2018-Feb-22 06:02:01.1234|AVC-00123HHGF|427654|Default|Name1 [1]|2334|2344444|(00:00:00.45567)|"Warning: Time elapsed:,3444, is smaller than Name2:44222"'

sed -i 's/'"$Var1"'/'"$Var3"'/' filename

sed -i "s/$Var1/$Var3/" filename

Var4='"Warning: Time elapsed:,3444, is smaller than Name2:44222"'
sed -i "/$Var1/a $Var4" filename

But nothing happens. Not even an error. It's there any other way to do this? I need to keep the same order of the lines within filename.

UPDATE: i've gave up on using sed and tried a less optimal solution, but it works.

I have 2 files: File_to_change File_with_lines_to_add

While read line; do
     Prkey=##calculate pk
     N=0
     While read linetoadd; do
          Prmkey=##calculate pk
          If [ "$Prkey" =="$Prmkey"  ]; then
                N=1
                echo "$line$linetoadd">>outfile
           Fi
     Done < File_with_lines_to_add
  If [ "$N" == "0" ]; then
      echo "$line">>outfile
  Fi
Done < File_to_change
2
  • Even the syntax highlighting here shows you the unclosed quote in the first sed statement.
    – choroba
    Feb 27, 2018 at 16:31
  • That was a misspelling sorry. I will correct the question. Feb 27, 2018 at 16:35

2 Answers 2

0
suffix="Warning: Time elapsed:,3444, is smaller than Name2:44222"
pattern="AVC-"
sed -E "/$pattern/s/^(.*)$/\1$suffix/" filename 

2018-Feb-22 06:02:01.1234|AVC-00123HHGF|427654|Default|Name1 [1]|2334|2344444|(00:00:00.45567)|Warning: Time elapsed:,3444, is smaller than Name2:44222
2018-Feb-22 07:02:01.1234|BCV-00123HHGF|427654|Default|Name1 [1]|2334|2344444|(00:00:00.45567)|
  • sed -E : -E allows later usage of () for grouping, without masking
    • "..." : the command. Double qoutes allow $x expressions to be evaluated by the shell, before sed gets them to read
      • /$pattern/ : look for this pattern and only act, if pattern is found
      • s/a/b/ : substitute expression a with b
        • /^(.*)$/ : our a-expression
        • ^ Start of line
        • (.*) : an arbitrary character, and in arbitrary count, captured as a group for later reference as \1, since it's the first group.
        • $ : end of line
        • /\1$suffix/ : our b-expression
        • \1 : what matched above the (.*) pattern
        • $suffix : what was replaced by the shell
  • filename

Note that many keywords (better key-characters, since most of them are only 1 character long) change their meaning by context, and quotation is important, and flags like -E, -i, -r.

For example, the $ can be interpreted by the shell, but if not touched, in can mean 'end of line' or 'last line' or 'Dollar Sign'.

'+' can mean at least one, '.' can mean 'any character', a \ is used for masking in sed, to introduce back references like \1. It's a mass but very useful to learn.

Use sed with care.

The vertical bar in "34|AVC-00123HHGF|42" will be interpreted by sed als alternative, either 4 or A and either F or 4. So that would match:

"34VC-00123..." "3AVC-00123.." "...HHGF2" "...HHG42"

which makes for 4 combinations of 2x2 alternatives, none of them matching "34|AVC-00123HHGF|42". How to handle that? Well - masking:

"34\|AVC-00123HHGF\|42"

which might again be done by other sed programs, but you guess where that leads to.

"34.AVC-00123HHGF.42" would match, so make reasonable paranoid decisions, and test and control. :)

1
  • I've tried little parts of this and it works but in the end i've gave up on using sed and made the concat using a less optimal solution. But at least i will be sure that i will not have problems in the future. Feb 28, 2018 at 11:52
0

Try this:

sed -i '' '/2018-Feb-22 06:02:01.1234|AVC-00123HHGF|/s/$/\"Warning: Time elapsed:,3444, is smaller than Name2:44222\"/' gilename

If that doesn't work, retreat to something simpler, tell us what happens when you try this:

sed 's/2018/XXXX/' filename
1
  • Tge second solution works, when i use one word string. The problem is with my large string full of special characters Feb 28, 2018 at 11:50

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