1

If I add an integer to a Python set object twice, Python will only add it once.

a = set()
a.add(5)
a.add(5)
print(a)
>> {5}

However, in my app I am am trying to add coroutines to a set, because I can't find a better way to keep track of which coroutines are already in the event_loop. I was surprised by the following behaviour:

async def foo(something):
    await asyncio.sleep(1)
    print(something)

a = set()
coro_obj = foo("hi") 
a.add(coro_obj)
coro_obj = foo("hi") 
a.add(coro_obj)
print(a)
{<coroutine object foo at 0x7f36f8c52888>, <coroutine object foo at 0x7f36f8c52360>}

I'm not really sure what I've done here. Am I right in thinking if the coroutine object wasn't hashable, it wouldn't get added to the set? So it is hashable, right?

Then if its hashable, why do we get two distinct hashes with the same method/argument?

  • 1
    add method actually returns None. – JSStuball Feb 28 '18 at 10:39
  • 1
    you create two func instance with distinct id of foo coroutine function...what exactly you want to achieve – ZhouQuan Feb 28 '18 at 10:40
  • 2
    you simply get a different coroutine object, every time you call the sync function. it can clearly be seen in the representation of those objects in the last line. – user3850 Feb 28 '18 at 10:40
1

Sets are using hash for comparing objects, so two objects would be consider equal if both objects' __ hash __() methods will return the same value. In your example, it would be something like this:

a = set()
coro_obj = foo("hi") 
a.add(coro_obj.__hash__())
coro_obj = foo("hi") 
a.add(coro_obj.__hash__())
print(a)
{-9223363267847141772, 8769007586508}

As you can see hashes of both objects are diffrent, this all depend on inner coroutine __ hash __ method implementation

ADDITION: And obj1.__ eq__(obj2) also supposed to be True

  • 2
    Not only that, but even if __hash__() returns the same value for both objects, they will still both be added independently if they aren't equal (using __eq__(other)). – Turksarama Feb 28 '18 at 11:19
  • Yes, you are right, Thank you for completing the question. – Basalex Feb 28 '18 at 11:25
1

You can use a dictionary to store functions and sets of arguments.

# dict to store functions
foo_dict = {}

# function that adds functions and sets of args to dict
d_add = lambda d, f, args : d[foo].add(args) if f in d else d.update({f: {args}} )

# function that makes a list of coroutine objects from this dict 
d_bake = lambda d:[f(*args) for f, args_list in d.items() for args in args_list]

Result:

d_add(foo_dict, foo, ("hi",))
d_add(foo_dict, foo, ("hi", "bye"))
d_add(foo_dict, foo, ("hi",))
d_add(foo_dict, foo, ("hi",))

print(foo_dict)
#{<function foo at 0x7fefc0be1268>: {('hi',), ('hi', 'bye')}}

print(d_bake(foo_dict))
#[<coroutine object foo at 0x7fefc0f39f68>, <coroutine object foo at 0x7fefc0bec048>]

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.