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This question already has an answer here:

I coming back to C# programming after some years of HTML/ASP. I came across these lines and cannot find what it does. It is a method in a class:

private string PeekNext()
{
    if (pos < 0)
        // pos < 0 indicates that there are no more tokens
        return null;
    if (pos < tokens.Length)
    {
        if (tokens[pos].Length == 0)
        {
            ++pos;
            return PeekNext();
        }
        return tokens[pos];
    }
    string line = reader.ReadLine();
    if (line == null)
    {
        // There is no more data to read
        pos = -1;
        return null;
    }
    // Split the line that was read on white space characters
    tokens = line.Split(null);
    pos = 0;
    return PeekNext();
}

Is it calling itself until some of the other Returns happens?

What is happening here, never seen a method returning itself!? What is Returned, empty string or what...? Or maybe I just missed it before.

Maybe simple but puzzles me.

marked as duplicate by René Vogt, SO used to be good, Owen Pauling, Stephen Kennedy, Michał Turczyn Feb 28 '18 at 16:26

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 1
    it's recursion looks like – Ehsan Sajjad Feb 28 '18 at 13:15
  • It will return result of "PeekNext()" method execution. It's typical for recursion, so i guess somehwere in the method body there is some if statement which will return actual value.\ – MajkeloDev Feb 28 '18 at 13:17
  • 2
    we can't tell without seeing the rest of the method. There surely are other return statements ending the recursion, otherwise this method would always result in a StackOverflowException. – René Vogt Feb 28 '18 at 13:17
  • Welcome to SO. Please follow stackoverflow.com/help/mcve to ask a better question. – Saleem Feb 28 '18 at 13:21
0
private string PeekNext()
    {
        if (pos < 0)
            // pos < 0 indicates that there are no more tokens
            return null;
        if (pos < tokens.Length)
        {
            if (tokens[pos].Length == 0)
            {
                ++pos;
                return PeekNext();
            }
            return tokens[pos];
        }
        string line = reader.ReadLine();
        if (line == null)
        {
            // There is no more data to read
            pos = -1;
            return null;
        }
        // Split the line that was read on white space characters
        tokens = line.Split(null);
        pos = 0;
        return PeekNext();
  • So it calls itself until some of the other Returns happens? – Per Welander Feb 28 '18 at 13:30
  • Please edit your question instead of answering it. – Fildor Feb 28 '18 at 13:38
  • Yes, it calls itself (in more than one place) but there are other non-recursive returns so you would expect it to eventually terminate. However, using recursion like this in C# is weird because it does not support tail recursion (without tricks), and might cause a stack overflow. You can probably rewrite it using loops. – dumetrulo Feb 28 '18 at 13:39
  • Yes I suspected that Stackoverflow might happen if it never ends. I have not done it, found it in an help-object for IO handling. – Per Welander Feb 28 '18 at 13:43
0

Notwithstanding the fact that the method depends on external (class) variables, and should probably be refactored to take its dependencies as parameters, a non-recursive version could look as follows:

private string PeekNext()
{
    while (pos >= 0)
    {
        if (pos < tokens.Length)
        {
            if (tokens[pos].Length == 0)
            {
                ++pos;
                continue;
            }
            return tokens[pos];
        }
        string line = reader.ReadLine();
        if (line == null)
        {
            // There is no more data to read
            pos = -1;
            return null;
        }
        // Split the line that was read on white space characters
        tokens = line.Split(null);
        pos = 0;
    }
    // pos < 0 indicates that there are no more tokens
    return null;
}
  • Thanks, looks safer. This explains why I have never seen recursion before because I have never had any reason to do it. Learned 30+ years ago when I studied Standard C programming to never risk getting into a infinite loop. :-) And that the Last statement should Always be an exit point. No objects.methods() at that time only Functions(). – Per Welander Feb 28 '18 at 14:03

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