3

How do I get the following to put the index of the parameter pack element in the tuple?

template< typename... Ts >
class ClassA {
public:
    ClassA( Ts... ts ) : tup( make_tuple( ts, 0 )... ) {}
    // I would like it to expand to this.
    // ClassA( T0 ts0, T1 ts1 ) : tup( make_tuple( ts0, 0 ), make_tuple(ts1, 1) ) {}
    tuple<tuple<Ts, size_t>...> tup;
};

void main() {
    vector<int> a ={ 2, 4, 5 };
    list<double> b ={ 1.1, 2.2, 3.3 };
    ClassA<vector<int>, list<double>, vector<int>, list<double>> mm( a, b, a, b );
}

Thanks.

  • Can you tag it with the correct language version? For template heavy things especially, but also just in general, 11 vs 14 vs 17 makes a big difference. – Nir Friedman Mar 1 '18 at 20:44
  • @NirFriedman - Good question; at the moment I've tagged C++11 because the question use varadic templates and tuples (so, at least, C++11). Hoping the OP will precise this point. – max66 Mar 1 '18 at 20:47
  • What you want is to use the indices trick. And, indeed, @max66 's answer applies the trick to your case. – einpoklum Mar 1 '18 at 20:57
  • I'm working with C++17 – Generic Name Mar 3 '18 at 20:50
5

It seems to me (if you can use at least C++14) a work for a delegating constructor

template <typename ... Ts>
class ClassA
 {
   private:
      template <std::size_t ... Is>
      ClassA (std::index_sequence<Is...> const &, Ts ... ts)
         : tup { std::make_tuple(ts, Is) ... }
       { }

   public:
      ClassA (Ts ... ts)
         : ClassA(std::make_index_sequence<sizeof...(Ts)>{}, ts...)
       { }

      std::tuple<std::tuple<Ts, std::size_t>...> tup;
 };

In C++11 this doesn't works because std::index_sequence and std::make_index_sequence are available only starting from C++14 but it isn't difficult to find (or develop) C++11 substitutes.

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  • This works for me. I actually lke Nirs solution below because it s nice, simple and very readable. However I am not sure if it incurs a slight runtime overhead due to the incrementation of i. – Generic Name Mar 1 '18 at 21:26
  • @user2099460 - yes: the Nir's solution is intriguing. – max66 Mar 1 '18 at 21:39
  • @user2099460 - for the runtime overhead... yes, from a theoretical point of view should be a little (little!) slower, I suppose; but I also suppose that a fairly decent compiler can optimize to avoid this problem. – max66 Mar 1 '18 at 21:42
  • @user2099460 I'm skeptical about runtime overhead. The compiler has all the information it needs to optimize. Also, you're envisioning putting types like vector inside this ClassA... such types have constructors with many lines of code. Incrementing an integer will be totally irrelevant. – Nir Friedman Mar 1 '18 at 22:18
2

You can avoid making the constructor a template, and index sequence in general, by simply incrementing an integer as part of the pack expansion:

template <typename ... Ts>
class ClassA
 {
   private:
      ClassA (size_t i, Ts ... ts)
         : tup { std::make_tuple(ts, i++) ... }
       { }

   public:
      ClassA (Ts ... ts)
         : ClassA(0, ts...)
       { }

      std::tuple<std::tuple<Ts, size_t>...> tup;
 };

I should note that gcc is currently giving me a warning about lacking a sequence point, but it seems like a false positive (and in any case this can be easily fixed by writing a tiny function and calling it).

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  • 1. What if the first parameter of Ts is an int itself? 2. Are you absolutely sure about the sequence points here? – einpoklum Mar 1 '18 at 20:57
  • @einpoklum Sorry, I don't follow 1. I should probably use size_t though not int, technically. As for 2, I don't know about absolutely, but I can't see any behavior from this that is both conforming and incorrect. The only freedom the compiler has here is whether the expression ts or i++ gets evaluated first, for each expansion of the pack. – Nir Friedman Mar 1 '18 at 21:00
  • Edited my (1.) question. 2. Can't the increments start from the end instead of the start of the initialization list? – einpoklum Mar 1 '18 at 21:01
  • @einpoklum Definitely not, initializer lists are left-to-right sequenced (unlike function calls). – Nir Friedman Mar 1 '18 at 21:03
  • In addition; it seems like (not that surprisingly) all variadic pack expansions are sequenced left to right, so even if you change the braces to parens, you're safe: stackoverflow.com/questions/22248587/…. – Nir Friedman Mar 1 '18 at 21:05

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