#!/bin/bash
if [!-d /home/mlzboy/b2c2/shared/db]; then
    mkdir -p /home/mlzboy/b2c2/shared/db;
fi;

This doesn't seem to work. Can anyone help?

  • 3
    Why do you have semicolons? – ADTC Apr 13 '16 at 11:05
  • 1
    The ; token is a command separator, so is newline. As then is a separate command, the preceding semicolon is needed to be be able to write it in the same line. The semicolons after mkdir and fi are superflous. – Andreas Riedmüller Jun 27 at 7:26

First, in bash "[" is just a command, which expects string "]" as a last argument, so the whitespace before the closing bracket (as well as between "!" and "-d" which need to be two separate arguments too) is important:

if [ ! -d /home/mlzboy/b2c2/shared/db ]; then
  mkdir -p /home/mlzboy/b2c2/shared/db;
fi

Second, since you are using -p switch to mkdir, this check is useless, because this is what does in the first place. Just write:

mkdir -p /home/mlzboy/b2c2/shared/db;

and thats it.

  • 1
    Note: the -p flag causes any parent directories to be created if necessary. – Danijel May 15 at 8:03
  • My god, I've never knew that "[" is a command. This explains so many of my problems... Easily the most useful thing I've ever read on StackOverflow. – Ben Kushigian Nov 16 at 2:11

There is actually no need to check whether it exists or not. Since you already wants to create it if it exists , just mkdir will do

mkdir -p /home/mlzboy/b2c2/shared/db
  • 1
    Note: the -p flag causes any parent directories to be created if necessary. – Danijel May 15 at 8:03

Simply do:

mkdir /path/to/your/potentially/existing/folder

mkdir will throw an error if the folder already exists. To ignore the errors write:

mkdir -p /path/to/your/potentially/existing/folder

No need to do any checking or anything like that.


For reference:

-p, --parents no error if existing, make parent directories as needed http://man7.org/linux/man-pages/man1/mkdir.1.html

  • 1
    The argument -p doesn't exactly ignore errors: it invokes a different mode where any path components that don't exist are created (and hence it is not an error if happens that zero need to be created). The behavior is different since it will create components other than the last one, which may or not be desirable. – BeeOnRope Nov 15 at 23:26

You need spaces inside the [ and ] brackets:

#!/bin/bash
if [ ! -d /home/mlzboy/b2c2/shared/db ] 
then
    mkdir -p /home/mlzboy/b2c2/shared/db
fi

Cleaner way, exploit shortcut evaluation of shell logical operators. Right side of the operator is executed only if left side is true.

[ ! -d /home/mlzboy/b2c2/shared/db ] && mkdir -p /home/mlzboy/b2c2/shared/db
  • 9
    mmh, not cleaner: just shorter. It's difficult to understand the meaning of such a statement if you come across it. – Davide Orazio Montersino Jul 25 '14 at 7:46
  • I like this, although the -p argument makes the check unnecessary. You can still use it when you don't want to use -p, that is when you don't want all the parent directories to be created automatically. – ADTC Apr 13 '16 at 11:11
  • 2
    Actually it's even shorter to write [ -d /path/to/dir ] || mkdir /path/to/dir .. right side is executed when the left side is false. – ADTC Apr 13 '16 at 11:23

I think you should re-format your code a bit:

#!/bin/bash
if [ ! -d /home/mlzboy/b2c2/shared/db ]; then
    mkdir -p /home/mlzboy/b2c2/shared/db;
fi;

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.