7

I'm trying to create a buffer overflow with C# for a school project:

unsafe
{
    fixed (char* ptr_str = new char[6] {'H', 'a', 'l', 'l', 'o', ','})
    {
        fixed (char* ptr_str2 = new char[6] {'W', 'e', 'r', 'e', 'l', 'd'})
        {
            fixed (char* ptr_str3 = new char[6] {'!', '!', '!', '!', '!', '!'})
            {
                for (int i = 0; i < 8; i++)
                {
                    ptr_str2[i] = 'a';
                }

                for (int i = 0; i < 6; i++)
                {
                    this.Label2.Text += ptr_str[i];
                    this.Label3.Text += ptr_str2[i];
                    this.Label4.Text += ptr_str3[i];
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

I thought this would flood ptr_str2 and thereby overwriting chars in ptr_str. However that does not seem to happen. It does execute but the values in ptr_str are not overwritten.

Can anyone help with achieving this? I don't understand what I'm doing wrong.

4
  • 1
    I guess you could start with ASP .NET MVC 2 project... Commented Feb 5, 2011 at 12:29
  • 2
    We're trying to avoid them, you're trying to make one... Strange world we live in.
    – alex
    Commented Feb 5, 2011 at 12:31
  • 6
    This would be a buffer overflow, not a stack overflow. Commented Feb 5, 2011 at 12:31
  • Yep I meant a buffer overflow...
    – BigChief
    Commented Feb 5, 2011 at 12:36

4 Answers 4

6

Stack overflow is an overflow of calling stack. It is done much easier:

int Test ()
{
    return Test ();
}

Console.WriteLine (Test ());

If you meant buffer overflow, there is a similar question.

2
  • Yes I meant a buffer flow where you overwrite a variable on the stack and not on the heap.
    – BigChief
    Commented Feb 5, 2011 at 12:36
  • 1
    Yes that's overflowing heap variables (structs). I would like to know how it can be done with stack variables. Where ptr_str2 overwrites ptr_str instead of ptr_str2 overwriting ptr_str3.
    – BigChief
    Commented Feb 5, 2011 at 12:40
6

The traditional attack that exploits a buffer overflow overflows a stack buffer; you are overflowing a heap buffer. It is a lot easier to see a write to one buffer smashing another buffer when they're both on the stack. Try using stackalloc instead of new char to force the allocation into the stack.

2
  • Thanks for your advice. I was already thinking I understood something wrong. I'm gonna check out stackalloc.
    – BigChief
    Commented Feb 5, 2011 at 16:21
  • Except stackalloc won't actually let you overflow the buffer though :) Commented Oct 18, 2017 at 2:26
5

You are missing the fact that arrays are objects themselves. They have an object header like any managed reference type and a private field that stores the array size. You have to overwrite those first before you start overwriting the array elements. On a 32-bit machine, you'll start overwriting the first element of ptr_str2 with this:

                        for (int i = 0; i < 13; i++) {
                            ptr_str[i] = 'a';
                        }

Of course, it had to be 13.

Observe this by setting a breakpoint on the for loop. Debug + Windows + Memory + Memory 1, type "ptr_str" in the Address box. Step the code to see the memory getting changed. You'll see ptr_str2 right after that, 4 bytes for the syncblk, 4 bytes for the method table pointer and 4 bytes for the array length. 12 bytes total, 6 chars.

6
  • Hey this an amazingly good tip. I had not found the memory window yet.. :P But now I see that I needed to overwrite the ptr_str3 sequence... Little mistake. Now I've got to check how I can overwrite the header values without causing a crash.
    – BigChief
    Commented Feb 5, 2011 at 14:10
  • Hmm, don't go there. The next garbage collection is going to re-arrange the arrays. They'll stay adjacent in memory only by accident. Commented Feb 5, 2011 at 14:19
  • Hmm... alright but isn't the garbage only collected when the array isn't needed anymore?? The undermentioned seems to do the trick. for (int i = 0; i < 36; i++) { if (i == 6) i += 24; ptr_str2[i] = 'a'; }
    – BigChief
    Commented Feb 5, 2011 at 14:26
  • The garbage collector also compacts the heap. Which moves objects. Commented Feb 5, 2011 at 14:27
  • Ah alright but I thought when you use fixed it stays in the same location of memory..?
    – BigChief
    Commented Feb 5, 2011 at 14:54
0

You do not seem to be making a Stackoverflow here - you aren't really using the stack at all. You seem instead to be trying to create a buffer overflow, I assume thinking that unsafe C# is like C, which it is similar but with several important differences.

A stackoverflow can be made simply:

public void Stackoverflow()
{
    Stackoverflow();
}

and then by calling Stackoverflow() somewhere.

3
  • Little fix: return Stackoverflow () or else make it void. Commented Feb 5, 2011 at 12:33
  • But if you're executing (safe) int i = 99; you're using the stack right?
    – BigChief
    Commented Feb 5, 2011 at 12:45
  • What probably should have said is you are using the stack but not massively increasing it's size (you actually use the stack for every operation in the .NET VM). As such it won't cause a StackOverflow. But you are looking for a buffer overflow anyhow. Commented Feb 5, 2011 at 12:53

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