8

I've tried to scan JEP-286 about local type inference. I see that this works only for local variables - understood. So this does work indeed:

public class TestClass {
    public static void main(String [] args){
        var list = new ArrayList<>();
        list.add("1");
        System.out.println(list.get(0)); // 1
    }  
}

I do see that this on the other hand does not compile:

public class TestClass {
    public var list = new ArrayList<>();
    public static void main(String [] args){

    }
}

It's obvious that it does not, since the JEP says so. Now my question:

It makes perfect sense for a public/protected member declared as var to fail, at least IMO. But why does it not compile even if it's private? I can only assume that you can still get a hold of that variable via reflection (and I can't get local fields like this)... And getting that variable would require a cast, well, a very confused cast probably.

1
  • 2
    Access modifiers and the scope finally being mixed and questioned for the var type inference. Another good question coming from you. :)
    – Naman
    Mar 5, 2018 at 5:27

5 Answers 5

20

The motivation for forbidding type inference for fields and method returns is that APIs should be stable; field access and method invocation are linked by descriptor at runtime, so things that cause subtle changes to inferred types could cause existing compiled clients to break in terrible ways if a change to the implementation caused the inferred type to change (modulo erasure.) So using this for implementation, but not for API, is a sensible guiding principle.

It is reasonable to ask "so, what about private fields and methods?" And indeed, we could well have chosen to do that. Like all design decisions, this is a tradeoff; it would enable inference to be used in more places, in exchange for more complexity in the user model. (I don't care as much about complexity in the spec or the compiler; that's our problem.) It is easier to reason about "inference for local variables yes, fields and methods no" than adding various epicyclic considerations like "but, fields and methods are OK if they are private". Drawing the line where we did also means that the compatibility consequences of changing a field or method from private to nonprivate doesn't have accidental interactions with inference.

So the short answer is, doing it this way makes the language simpler, without making the feature dramatically less useful.

0
6

Various reasons:

  1. Visibility and type are orthogonal - one shouldn't impact the other. If private variables could be initialized with var, you'd had to change that when making them protected or public.

  2. Because var uses the right-hand side to infer the type, such private fields always needed to be initialized right away. If moving initialization into a constructor, you'd have to make the type explicit.

  3. With var the compiler can infer types that you can currently can't express in Java (e.g. intersection types like Comparable & Serializable). You might of course end up relying on those specific types and when you have to stop using var at some point for any reason, you might have to refactor quite a lot to keep your code working.

3
  • are you implying that IFF an instance private variable would be declare in place, it could be used as a var? In such a case it seems reasonable to imply (also) that final fields could be declared like this - they are either initialized inside a constructor or in-place.
    – Eugene
    Mar 2, 2018 at 14:48
  • and btw, if this is the case... inside a method (local) var x; would not compile, so why not do the same thing for instance variables? I think we are probably missing something here, thinking that we ignore for a moment visibility of varaibles
    – Eugene
    Mar 2, 2018 at 15:01
  • 1
    I can't quite follow your questions. To clarify, var fields are under no circumstances possible in Java 10. In 2. I want to say that if that were possible (and type inference would work the way it does now), these fields would have to be initialized right away because var x; doesn't work (it doesn't work now in local variables). Mar 2, 2018 at 15:56
6

It’s not like it was entirely impossible to turn these variables into fields that can be inspected via Reflection. E.g., you can do

var l = new ArrayList<String>();
l.add("text");
System.out.println(l);
System.out.println(
  new Object(){ { var x = l; } }.getClass().getDeclaredFields()[0].getGenericType()
);

In the current version, it just prints ArrayList, so the actual generic type has not been stored in the class file of the anonymous inner class and it’s unlikely that this will change, as supporting this introspection is not an the actual goal. It’s also just a special case that the type is denotable like ArrayList<String>. To illustrate a different case:

var acs = true? new StringBuilder(): CharBuffer.allocate(10);
acs.append("text");
acs.subSequence(1, 2);
System.out.println(
  new Object(){ { var x = acs; } }.getClass().getDeclaredFields()[0].getGenericType()
);

The type of acs is an intersection type of Appendable and CharSequence, as demonstrated by invoking a method of either interface on it, but since it is not specified whether the compiler infers #1 extends Appendable&CharSequence or #1 extends CharSequence&Appendable, it is unspecified whether the code will print java.lang.Appendable or java.lang.CharSequence.

I don’t think that this is an issue for a synthetic field, but for an explicitly declared field, it might be.

However, I doubt that the expert group considered such impacts en detail. Instead, the decision not to support field declarations (and hence skip lengthy thinking about the implications) was made right from the start, as local variables always were the intended target for that feature. The number of local variables is much higher than the number of field declarations, so reducing the boilerplate for local variable declarations has the biggest impact.

1
  • I really like this, it answers my question, but its hard to beat the "architect". Thank you
    – Eugene
    Mar 3, 2018 at 19:02
5

Elaborating on Nicolai's answer (specifically his #2 reason), the proposed draft of JLS 10 states that both var e; and var g = null; are illegal for local variables, and for good reason; it's not clear from the right-hand side (or lack thereof) which type to infer for var.

Currently, non-final instance variables are automatically initialized depending on their type (primitives to 0 and false, and references to null, as I'm sure you already know). The inferred type of an instance variable would remain unclear unless it is initialized at declaration or within its respective class' constructor(s).

For that reason, I support allowing var to be used only when the variable is both private and final so we can ensure that it is initialized by the time that the class is created. Though, I cannot say how difficult this would be to implement.

4

It would be a reasonable decision to allow var for private fields (IMO). But omitting it makes the feature simpler.

Also it can be added in some future release after there is more experience with the local-only type inference, while removing a feature is much harder.

3
  • what about reflection in this case? suppose this is possible and you get a hold of that var, would it still be an Object that you need to cast? I don't know...
    – Eugene
    Mar 2, 2018 at 14:18
  • 2
    The field would have the type given by the initializer, so var x = new Object() would be an Object and var x = "" would be a String, just like with local variables. Reflection always gives you an Object, nothing would change there. field.getType() would return the inferred type. Mar 2, 2018 at 14:27
  • +1, I still don't think this is the thing that I was looking for, unfortunately. inside a method var x; would not compile for obvious reasons, while var x = "" will. So if you define the type (right side) as something that can be inferred, I see no reasons for this not working for instance variables. I really think it's something deeper here
    – Eugene
    Mar 2, 2018 at 15:03

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