20

If I run apt, I can update the package cache:

apt:
  name: postgresql
  state: present
  update_cache: yes

I'm now trying to use the generic package command, but I don't see a way to do this.

package:
  name: postgresql
  state: present

Do I have to run an explicit command to run apt-get update, or can I do this using the package module?

3
  • What is the problem to solve?
    – techraf
    Mar 3, 2018 at 17:47
  • Not really sure what you're asking. I'm trying to install a package. On ubuntu, in my particular environment, I have to call apt-get update first, or it fails. I'd like to use package to minimize the distro specific commands I use. Mar 3, 2018 at 18:37
  • If you want to use package then fork it and patch.
    – techraf
    Mar 3, 2018 at 18:50

5 Answers 5

14

This is not possible.

The module package as of writing is just capable to handle package presence, so you have to use directly the package module to refresh the cache.

1
  • ok, but can you provide an example playbook that does meet OP's needs? Maybe one where the first task uses the apt module to update the cache (using when so it only executes on apt-based systems), then uses the package module to install? May 17, 2021 at 11:26
9

Update

Nowadays, Ansible provides a generic solution 🎉:

- name: Update package cache
  ansible.builtin.package:
    update_cache: true

Unfortunately, Ansible does not yet offer a generic solution.

However, the variable ansible_pkg_mgr provides reliable information about the installed package manager. In turn, you can use this information to call the specific Ansible package modules. Please find attached an example for all common package managers.

- hosts: all
  become: yes
  tasks:
    - name: update apt cache
      ansible.builtin.apt:
        update_cache: yes
      when: ansible_pkg_mgr == "apt"
    
    - name: update yum cache
      ansible.builtin.yum:
        update_cache: yes
      when: ansible_pkg_mgr == "yum"
    
    - name: update apk cache
      community.general.apk:
        update_cache: yes
      when: ansible_pkg_mgr == "apk"
    
    - name: update dnf cache
      ansible.builtin.dnf:
        update_cache: yes
      when: ansible_pkg_mgr == "dnf"
    
    - name: update zypper cache
      community.general.zypper:
        name: zypper
        update_cache: yes
      when: ansible_pkg_mgr == "zypper"
    
    - name: update pacman cache
      community.general.pacman:
        update_cache: yes
      when: ansible_pkg_mgr == "pacman"
1
  • 1
    Note the become: yes for all tasks if copying only single blocks!
    – jan
    Jan 17, 2023 at 13:28
7

You can't with the package module, unfortunately, but you can do a two-step where you update the cache first before running the rest of your playbook(s).

- hosts: all
  become: yes
  tasks:
  - name: Update Package Cache (apt/Ubuntu)
    tags: always
    apt:
      update_cache: yes
    changed_when: false
    when: ansible_distribution == "Ubuntu"

  - name: Update Package Cache (dnf/CentOS)
    tags: always
    dnf:
      update_cache: yes
    changed_when: false
    when: ansible_distribution == "CentOS"

  - name: Update Package Cache (yum/Amazon)
    tags: always
    yum:
      update_cache: yes
    changed_when: false
    when: ansible_distribution == "Amazon"
1
  • why is changed_when set to false? I guess it's difficult to determine if that really changed something, but wouldn't true for could always have changed something be better as default? Where is the advantage in false?
    – jan
    Jan 17, 2023 at 13:12
6

Yes.

Simply include update_cache: yes in your call to the ansible.builtin.package module:

package:
  name: postgresql
  state: present
  update_cache: yes

This works because as of 2020, Ansible passes any additional arguments to the underlying package manager:

While all arguments will be passed to the underlying module, not all modules support the same arguments. This documentation only covers the minimum intersection of module arguments that all packaging modules support.

Source: Package Module Docs

0

Actually, I read in official and latest Doc from Ansible, and nothing regarding update_cache appears to be documented there:

ansible_doc

But testing at home, I made ansible fail, in order to read the failure, and update_cache seems to be one of the options to use:

update_cache

1
  • It seems to pass the option to pacman module, so I think any option that works with your package module sould work as well Mar 5 at 22:04

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