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Data is present in an excel file with first column representing the first node, the second column representing the second node and the third containing the weight.

The nodes are strings.

Eg:

Apple Banana 65
Orange Apple 32

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1 Answer 1

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First thing to do is to import the Excel file. The most straightforward way is to use pandas:

import pandas
data = pandas.read_excel("path/to/edgelist", header=None)

This will return a dataframe of the form

In [2]: data  
Out[2]:  
        0       1   2  
0   Apple  Banana  65  
1  Orange   Apple  32  

The Short Way: using networkx

Let's first load the networkx package

import networkx

Then, from data we take the edge list as a list-of-lists:

edgeList = data.values.tolist()

and in this way, we get

In [19]: edgeList
Out[19]: [['Apple', 'Banana', 65], ['Orange', 'Apple', 32]]

Let's create an empty (directed) graph G:

G = networkx.DiGraph()

and then we add the edges with a simple for-loop:

for i in range(len(edgeList)):
    G.add_edge(edgeList[i][0], edgeList[i][1], weight=edgeList[i][2])

and we can easily retrieve the adjacency matrix as

A = networkx.adjacency_matrix(G).A

that reads as a plain and simple numpy array

In [30]: A
Out[30]:
array([[ 0, 65,  0],
       [ 0,  0,  0],
       [32,  0,  0]], dtype=int64)

NOTE: the above adjacency matrix refers to a weighted and directed graph (namely, an edge exist from Apple to Banana, but there is no edge from Banana to Apple). If one needs a weighted and undirected graph (namely, if an edge exists from Apple to Banana, then an edge exists from Banana to Apple), just use

G = networkx.Graph()

instead of

G = networkx.DiGraph()

The Long Way: manually

Let's take the first and second column in order to gather node IDs

nodes = data.iloc[:, 0].tolist() + data.iloc[:, 1].tolist()

thus

In [4]: nodes
Out[4]: [u'Apple', u'Orange', u'Banana', u'Apple']

Let's sort and remove duplicates (sorting is not mandatory anyways)

nodes = sorted(list(set(nodes)))

and nodes now has the form

In [8]: nodes
Out[8]: [u'Apple', u'Banana', u'Orange']

Let's map each node (string) with a sequential numerical ID to feed the adjacency matrix

nodes = [(i,nodes[i]) for i in range(len(nodes))]

and nodes now has the form

In [10]: nodes
Out[10]: [(0, u'Apple'), (1, u'Banana'), (2, u'Orange')]

Now that string-to-integer mapping is done, let's replace in the original dataframe (data) each string with its corresponding ID

In [15]: for i in range(len(nodes)):
    ...:     data = data.replace(nodes[i][1], nodes[i][0])

and now data has the form

In [16]: data
Out[16]:
   0  1   2
0  0  1  65
1  2  0  32

So you see that every occurrence of Apple has been replaced with 0, every occurrence of Banana has been replaced with 1 and every occurrence od Orange has been replaced with 2 (according to the variable nodes).

In order to build the adjacency matrix, let's import another well-known package (scipy)

from scipy.sparse import coo_matrix 

and create a coordinate-based sparse matrix

M = coo_matrix((data.iloc[:,2], (data.iloc[:,0],data.iloc[:,1])), shape=(len(nodes), len(nodes)))

this creates a sparse adjacency matrix (less memory footprint for graphs with many nodes and few edges). If you need a dense adjacency matrix, then

M = M.todense()

where M has finally the form

matrix([[ 0, 65,  0],
        [ 0,  0,  0],
        [32,  0,  0]])

NOTE: the above adjacency matrix refers to a weighted and directed graph (namely, an edge exist from Apple to Banana, but there is no edge from Banana to Apple). If one needs a weighted and undirected graph (namely, if an edge exists from Apple to Banana, then an edge exists from Banana to Apple), just transpose the above adjacency matrix

M_symmetric = M + M.T 

where

In [38]: M_symmetric
Out[38]:
matrix([[ 0, 65, 32],
        [65,  0,  0],
        [32,  0,  0]])
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  • You can shortcut a lot of your getting to your end data by new_df = df[[0, 1]].stack().rank(method='dense').unstack().combine_first(df).astype(int) Commented Mar 4, 2018 at 13:12

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