I'm trying to write a parser for a simple DSL which has a good dozen statements in the form <statementName> <param1> <param2> ... ;, where the number of parameters vary. As the structure of the statements is very similar (all matching the statement name string followed by a series of tokens given by name) and the structure of the made results is very similar (all storing the statement name and a hash of the parameters), I'd like to know how I could specify the wanted result structure without having to repeat myself for each statement action.

Pseudo-code of an action class that would help me to specify such a result structure:

class FooActions {

  method *_stmt ($/) { 
    @result[0] = make string of statement name $/[0];
    @result[1] = make hash of $/[1..] with the keys being the name of the rule 
      at index (i.e. '"var"' for `<var=identifier>` and `"type"` for `<type>`, etc.) and 
      values being the `.made` results for the rules at index (see below);
    return @result;
  }

  method identifier ($/) { return ~$/ }

  method number ($/) { return +$/ }

  method type ($/) { return ~$/ }
}

Test file:

use v6;
use Test;
use Foo;
my $s;
$s = 'GoTo 2 ;';
is_deeply Foo::FooGrammar.parse($s).made, ('GoTo', {pos => 2});
$s = 'Set foo 3 ;';
is_deeply Foo::FooGrammar.parse($s).made, ('Set', {var => 'foo', target => 3});
$s = 'Get bar Long ;';
is_deeply Foo::FooGrammar.parse($s).made, ('Get', {var => 'bar', type => 'Long'});
$s = 'Set foo bar ;';
is_deeply Foo::FooGrammar.parse($s).made, ('Set', {var => 'foo', target => 'bar'});

Grammar:

use v6;
unit package Foo;

grammar FooGrammar is export {
  rule TOP { <stmt> ';' }
  rule type { 'Long' | 'Int' }
  rule number { \d+ }
  rule identifier { <alpha> \w* }
  rule numberOrIdentifier { <number> || <identifier> }

  rule goto_stmt { 'GoTo' <pos=number> }
  rule set_stmt { 'Set' <var=identifier> <target=numberOrIdentifier> }
  rule get_stmt { 'Get' <var=identifier> <type> }
  rule stmt { <goto_stmt> || <set_stmt> || <get_stmt> }
}
  • What is the \a in the indentifier rule? – Håkon Hægland Mar 5 at 8:38
  • @HåkonHægland That should match any alphabetic character. Sorry, the code is untested and might have to be slightly modified to compile. – rubystallion Mar 5 at 8:40
  • Ok :) By the way, there is also a missing declaration of the <stmt> rule referred to in the TOP rule – Håkon Hægland Mar 5 at 8:44
  • @HåkonHægland Thanks, corrected! – rubystallion Mar 5 at 9:14
  • 1
    @HåkonHægland You're correct, I'm asking for how to implement the action class and I've updated my question to make my intent clearer. There's just a bit more than a dozen statements, but with Perl6's extensive reflection capabilities, I'd still be interested in how to avoid repetition there, as that might come in handy for many grammars. – rubystallion Mar 6 at 0:37
up vote 6 down vote accepted

This approach represents each statement type as a Proto-regex and uses syms to avoid repeating the statement keywords (GoTo etc).

Individual statements don't have action methods. These are handled at the next level (TOP), which uses the caps method on the match, to convert it to a hash.

The <sym> capture is used to extra the keyword. The remainder of the line s converted to a hash. Solution follows:

Grammar and Actions:

use v6;
unit package Foo;

grammar Grammar is export {
  rule TOP { <stmt> ';' }
  token type { 'Long' | 'Int' }
  token number { \d+ }
  token identifier { <alpha>\w* }
  rule numberOrIdentifier { <number> || <identifier> }

  proto rule stmt {*}
  rule stmt:sym<GoTo> { <sym> <pos=.number> }
  rule stmt:sym<Set>  { <sym> <var=.identifier> <target=.numberOrIdentifier> }
  rule stmt:sym<Get>  { <sym> <var=.identifier> <type> }
}

class Actions {
      method number($/)     { make +$/ }
      method identifier($/) { make ~$/ }
      method type($/)       { make ~$/ }
      method numberOrIdentifier($/)   { make ($<number> // $<identifier>).made }
      method TOP($/) {
          my %caps = $<stmt>.caps;
          my $keyw = .Str
              given %caps<sym>:delete;
          my %args = %caps.pairs.map: {.key => .value.made};
          make ($keyw,%args, );
      }
   }

Tests:

use v6;
use Test;
use Foo;
my $actions = Foo::Actions.new;
my $s;
$s = 'GoTo 2 ;';
is-deeply Foo::Grammar.parse($s, :$actions).made, ('GoTo', {pos => 2});
$s = 'Set foo 3;';
is-deeply Foo::Grammar.parse($s, :$actions).made, ('Set', {var => 'foo', target => 3});
$s = 'Get bar Long ;';
is-deeply Foo::Grammar.parse($s, :$actions).made, ('Get', {var => 'bar', type => 'Long'});
$s = 'Set foo bar ;';
is-deeply Foo::Grammar.parse($s, :$actions).made, ('Set', {var => 'foo', target => 'bar'});
  • 1
    With these tricks I'll have even more fun writing grammars, just what I needed :) – rubystallion Mar 6 at 5:00

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