50

I want to know if it's possible to change the text size and color incrementally on the same line, like this:

enter image description here

I want to use CSS only if possible. Any other solution, that at least doesn't force me to put each letter in its own span, is welcome, too.

body {
  font-family:monospace;
}
<span style="font-size:50px;">L</span><span style="font-size:45px;opacity:0.7">o</span><span style="font-size:38px;opacity:0.5">r</span>...

4
  • 7
    You'll need to wrap every letter in an element (like span), and use nth-child to select the one you want. Mar 5 '18 at 9:39
  • I'm not sure how that could be done using pure CSS. I used a library called letteringJS which auto wrapped my text content in spans for me. That might give you a base to work off of from Mar 5 '18 at 9:40
  • use javascript to split and put letters in to span tags Mar 5 '18 at 9:40
  • You most certainly do want to use CSS. But I understand that you don't want to put each letter in its own DOM element. (These are two entirely different things.) Mar 6 '18 at 8:13
88

What about some transformation and gradient without all these markup:

body {
  perspective: 250px;
  perspective-origin: bottom;
}

div {
  font-size: 70px;
  background: linear-gradient(to right, black,rgba(0,0,0,0.3),rgba(0,0,0,0.2));
  display: inline-block;
  -webkit-background-clip: text;
  background-clip: text;
  -webkit-text-fill-color: transparent;
  color: transparent;
  transform: rotateY(70deg);
  transform-origin: left;
}
<div>
  Lorem Ipsum Lorem
</div>

1
  • 3
    @AndreasRejbrand the 3D transformation is used here to give the illusion that the text size is changing (as per the question). Mar 6 '18 at 10:08
70

That really depends on your HTML markup. You can't do this with plain text "Lorem ipsum", but you can do it if each letter is wrapped in its own separate element pretty simply:

body > span {
  font-size: 72px;
}

span > span {
  font-size: 85%;
  opacity: 0.8;
}
<span>
  L<span>
    o<span>
      r<span>
        e<span>
          m <span>
            i<span>
              p<span>
                s<span>
                  u<span>
                    m
                  </span>
                </span>
              </span>
            </span>
          </span>
        </span>
      </span>
    </span>
  </span>
</span>

You likely won't be able to do this without modifying your existing markup or introducing some JavaScript to do this for you, however.

As for the colour, you can change the opacity of each letter with this approach (as per the above example), but I'm not sure if this is possible as easily without having to apply styling to each letter individually.

4
  • 3
    Mmmm, putting every single letter in its own <span>... now wrap them into individual <div>s, and the design possibilites are truly limitless! Isn't CSS wonderful?
    – Joker_vD
    Mar 5 '18 at 14:04
  • 1
    @EricDuminil that's cool. The only downside to that approach is that anything which makes the containing box visible (highlighting the text, adding background, shadow, etc) will make it really obvious that it's a 3D transition and not a flat design. That's not necessarily a bad thing though, I guess. Mar 5 '18 at 14:05
  • @JamesDonnelly If you abuse z-order and clipping paths you can get around that.
    – wizzwizz4
    Mar 5 '18 at 17:30
  • How about margin: 0 -.25em; to decrease the space between the letters?
    – xehpuk
    Mar 5 '18 at 22:35
16

Using James Donnelly answer with a bit of JS:

format = ([head, ...tail]) => {
    if(tail.length == 0)
        return "<span>" + head + "</span>";
    return "<span>" + head + format(tail) + "</span>";
}

var el = document.querySelector(".test");

el.innerHTML = format(el.innerText)
.test > span {
    font-size: 72px;
}

span > span {
    font-size: 85%;
    opacity: 0.8;
}
<div class="test">
    Lorem ipsum
</div>

4
  • 1
    You JS had problems with text containing &lt; characters, those will show up as invalid html
    – Ferrybig
    Mar 6 '18 at 14:12
  • I couldn't reproduce it, can you give me an example? Mar 6 '18 at 16:01
  • 1
    That is exactly why one does not construct DOM via strings in JS. When you read textContent things like < will not be encoded. You then construct HTML from that before encoding it properly. Of course this will break.
    – H.B.
    Mar 6 '18 at 18:23
  • 2
    Here would be a cleaner version of how to do it. Note that most browsers will just treat a stray < as text, even though it definitely is invalid HTML.
    – H.B.
    Mar 6 '18 at 18:54
3

inspired from @James Donnelly's answer

this solution more dynamic , spans will be generated using javascript

checkout the code

document.addEventListener('DOMContentLoaded', function()
{ 
    var fooDiv = document.getElementsByClassName("foo")[0];
    var text = fooDiv.innerHTML.trim();
    var textToSpans = "";
    var textLength = text.length;
    for(var i=0;i<textLength;i++){
        textToSpans += "<span>" + text[i];
    }

    for(i=0;i<textLength;i++){
        textToSpans += "</span>";
    }
    fooDiv.innerHTML = textToSpans;

    //change the class so if this code run again this div will not effected
    fooDiv.className = "bar";

}, false);
.bar > span {
    font-size: 72px;
}

span > span {
    font-size: 85%;
    opacity: 0.8;
}
<div class="foo">
    Lorem ips
</div>

1

var GradientLetters = class {
  constructor(id, fontSizeStep) {
    this.element = document.getElementById(id);
    this.fontSizeStep = fontSizeStep;  
    this.letters = document.getElementById(id).innerText.split("");
    document.getElementById(id).innerText = "";
    this.makeGradient();
  }
  makeGradient() {
    this.letters.forEach((currentValue, index) => {
      let span = document.createElement("SPAN");
      span.innerText = currentValue;
      span.style.color = "rgba(0, 0, 0, " + (1 / index) + ")";
      span.style.fontSize = 60 - (index * 2) + "px";
      this.element.appendChild(span);
		});
  }
}
let gradientLetters = new GradientLetters("gradient-letters", 10);
p {
  font-family: Arial;
}
<p id="gradient-letters">Lorem ip</p>

Impossible. Without wrapping the letters inside HTML tags simply You can't change CSS properties of the single letters. The only thing that I've found is the ::first-letter selector, for the first letter, not the following.

Explanation in the CSS context

CSS font-size Property and CSS color Property are properties that you can define in the context of selectors.

Selectors are patterns that match against elements in a tree, and as such form one of several technologies that can be used to select nodes in a document.

So, defining CSS properties without pointing to elements (in this case, HTML element) seems to be not possible.

Using JavaScript

Using JavaScript is possible to split a string (In this case the innerText of an HTML Element like a paragraph) in letters, wrapping those letters in HTML Elements and then, style those Elements with CSS in several ways. In this case should be better to set CSS programmatically.

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