10

For testing purposes I would like to manually be able to drop and recreate a DB using EF CodeFirst CTP5. How would I do this?

  • you can use the Database.SetInitializer, read in the comments here weblogs.asp.net/scottgu/archive/2010/08/03/… – Kris Ivanov Feb 6 '11 at 3:28
  • You'll regularly get the following exception though: Cannot drop database "..." because it is currently in use. Just restart VisualStudio and you're good. This CodeFirst feature is still pretty unstable. – RedGlyph Feb 6 '11 at 17:27
21

The DbDatabase class available as a property on your DbContext object offers a set of methods for directly working with database. You can use the Create and Delete method for this matter:

using (var context = new YourContext())
{
    context.Database.Delete();
    context.Database.Create();
    // Or
    context.Database.CreateIfNotExists();
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    And don't forget to close any connection to your database (from within Visual Studio or so) otherwise you'll get an exception saying the database is in use... – Marino van der Heijden Aug 23 '11 at 11:19
  • Calling Database.Connection.Close() before Database.Delete() doesn't help. You still get the message that the database is in use. – Greg Apr 7 '12 at 10:47
  • 1
    Greg, that's because the database really is in use. You might have it open in Server Explorer--try closing that connection first. – mjohnsonengr Jan 10 '13 at 22:40
4

This works for me but not dave answer with entity framework 5.0. You will have to trigger a database trip that like a query in order to trigger the action.

Global.asax 
   Database.SetInitializer<MedicalVarianceDataContext >(new DataInitializer());

Elsewhere

 public class DropDatabaseInitializer<T> : IDatabaseInitializer<T> where T : DbContext, new()
    {
        public DropDatabaseInitializer(Action<T> seed = null)
        {

        }

    protected virtual void Seed(T context) { }
    public void InitializeDatabase(T context)
    {
        if (context.Database.Exists())
        {
            context.Database.ExecuteSqlCommand("ALTER DATABASE " + context.Database.Connection.Database + " SET SINGLE_USER WITH ROLLBACK IMMEDIATE");
            context.Database.ExecuteSqlCommand("USE master DROP DATABASE " + context.Database.Connection.Database);
        }

        context.Database.Create();
        Seed(context);

    }
}

I guess you will also need to add context.savechanges();

    protected override void Seed(MedicalVarianceDataContext context)
    {

         new List<ViewLookUpIndividualUnit>{

            new ViewLookUpIndividualUnit{  MvrsIndividualUnit="Clinic" ,Active=true}


        }.ForEach(k => context.ViewLookUpIndividualUnits.Add(k));

        base.Seed(context);
        context.SaveChanges(); 
    }
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  • I added an edit on Dave but dont know if it will take place. So here. – hidden Sep 17 '12 at 22:47
  • Beware that if your database name contains hyphens you'll need to do this: [My-DatabaseName-with-hyphens] in the ExecuteSqlCommand part. – Leniel Maccaferri Oct 1 '12 at 18:52
2

I realize this is dated but I couldn't get the accepted solution working so I rolled a quick solution...

using System;
using System.Data.Entity;

namespace YourCompany.EntityFramework
{
    public class DropDatabaseInitializer<T> : IDatabaseInitializer<T> where T : DbContext, new()
    {
        public DropDatabaseInitializer(Action<T> seed = null)
        {
            Seed = seed ?? delegate {};
        }

        public Action<T> Seed { get; set; }

        public void InitializeDatabase(T context)
        {
            if (context.Database.Exists())
            {
                context.Database.ExecuteSqlCommand("ALTER DATABASE " + context.Database.Connection.Database + " SET SINGLE_USER WITH ROLLBACK IMMEDIATE");
                context.Database.ExecuteSqlCommand("USE master DROP DATABASE " + context.Database.Connection.Database);
            }

            context.Database.Create();

            Seed(context);
        }
    }
}

This works for me and supports seeding easily.

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