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I have a data frame that I have converted to tidy text format in R to get rid of stop words. I would now like to 'untidy' that data frame back to its original format.

What's the opposite / inverse command of unnest_tokens? I checked answer in another similar question asked on this forum and I can do the following:

if I wanted to get my text back to its original form after some processing in its tidied form, using map functions from purrr.

First, let's go from raw text to a tidied format.

library(tidyverse)
library(tidytext)


tidy_austen <- janeaustenr::austen_books() %>%
  group_by(book) %>%
  mutate(linenumber = row_number()) %>%
  ungroup() %>%
  unnest_tokens(word, text)

tidy_austen
#> # A tibble: 725,055 x 3
#>                   book linenumber        word
#>                 <fctr>      <int>       <chr>
#>  1 Sense & Sensibility          1       sense
#>  2 Sense & Sensibility          1         and
#>  3 Sense & Sensibility          1 sensibility
#>  4 Sense & Sensibility          3          by
#>  5 Sense & Sensibility          3        jane
#>  6 Sense & Sensibility          3      austen
#>  7 Sense & Sensibility          5        1811
#>  8 Sense & Sensibility         10     chapter
#>  9 Sense & Sensibility         10           1
#> 10 Sense & Sensibility         13         the
#> # ... with 725,045 more rows

The text is tidy now! But we can untidy it, back to something sort of like its original form. I typically approach this using nest from tidyr, and then some map functions from purrr.

nested_austen <- tidy_austen %>%
  nest(word) %>%
  mutate(text = map(data, unlist), 
         text = map_chr(text, paste, collapse = " ")) 

nested_austen
#> # A tibble: 62,272 x 4
#>                   book linenumber              data
#>                 <fctr>      <int>            <list>
#>  1 Sense & Sensibility          1  <tibble [3 x 1]>
#>  2 Sense & Sensibility          3  <tibble [3 x 1]>
#>  3 Sense & Sensibility          5  <tibble [1 x 1]>
#>  4 Sense & Sensibility         10  <tibble [2 x 1]>
#>  5 Sense & Sensibility         13 <tibble [12 x 1]>
#>  6 Sense & Sensibility         14 <tibble [13 x 1]>
#>  7 Sense & Sensibility         15 <tibble [11 x 1]>
#>  8 Sense & Sensibility         16 <tibble [12 x 1]>
#>  9 Sense & Sensibility         17 <tibble [11 x 1]>
#> 10 Sense & Sensibility         18 <tibble [15 x 1]>
#> # ... with 62,262 more rows, and 1 more variables: text <chr>

Please can someone help me to change the above code if I tokenize into n grams where n can be 2 or 3.

What I am trying to do is:

Step 1: Split text into trigrams

Step 2: View the trigrams and see which make sense (Here I need to check it manually and I will replace only those which make sense to me)

Step: 3 Replace these trigrams in original text as a single word joined by _

Step 4: Repeat above for bigrams

Step 5: Then tokenize again

1

If I am understanding correctly what you want to do, you can turn your bigrams (or trigrams, just change to n = 3) into a single unit with a call to mutate().

library(tidyverse)
library(tidytext)


tidy_austen <- janeaustenr::austen_books() %>%
  group_by(book) %>%
  mutate(linenumber = row_number()) %>%
  ungroup() %>%
  unnest_tokens(bigram, text, token = "ngrams", n = 2) %>%
  mutate(bigram = str_replace_all(bigram, " ", "_"))

tidy_austen
#> # A tibble: 662,783 x 3
#>    book                linenumber bigram         
#>    <fct>                    <int> <chr>          
#>  1 Sense & Sensibility          1 sense_and      
#>  2 Sense & Sensibility          1 and_sensibility
#>  3 Sense & Sensibility          3 by_jane        
#>  4 Sense & Sensibility          3 jane_austen    
#>  5 Sense & Sensibility         10 chapter_1      
#>  6 Sense & Sensibility         13 the_family     
#>  7 Sense & Sensibility         13 family_of      
#>  8 Sense & Sensibility         13 of_dashwood    
#>  9 Sense & Sensibility         13 dashwood_had   
#> 10 Sense & Sensibility         13 had_long       
#> # ... with 662,773 more rows

Then you can re-nest your text in much the same way as in my other answer.

nested_austen <- tidy_austen %>%
  nest(bigram) %>%
  mutate(text = map(data, unlist), 
         text = map_chr(text, paste, collapse = " ")) 

nested_austen %>%
  select(text)
#> # A tibble: 61,180 x 1
#>    text                                                                   
#>    <chr>                                                                  
#>  1 sense_and and_sensibility                                              
#>  2 by_jane jane_austen                                                    
#>  3 chapter_1                                                              
#>  4 the_family family_of of_dashwood dashwood_had had_long long_been been_…
#>  5 was_large large_and and_their their_residence residence_was was_at at_…
#>  6 their_property property_where where_for for_many many_generations gene…
#>  7 respectable_a a_manner manner_as as_to to_engage engage_the the_genera…
#>  8 surrounding_acquaintance acquaintance_the the_late late_owner owner_of…
#>  9 man_who who_lived lived_to to_a a_very very_advanced advanced_age age_…
#> 10 life_had had_a a_constant constant_companion companion_and and_houseke…
#> # ... with 61,170 more rows

Created on 2018-03-20 by the reprex package (v0.2.0).

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