139

Problem

I would like to know how to get the distance and bearing between 2 GPS points. I have researched on the haversine formula. Someone told me that I could also find the bearing using the same data.

Edit

Everything is working fine but the bearing doesn't quite work right yet. The bearing outputs negative but should be between 0 - 360 degrees. The set data should make the horizontal bearing 96.02166666666666 and is:

Start point: 53.32055555555556 , -1.7297222222222221   
Bearing:  96.02166666666666  
Distance: 2 km  
Destination point: 53.31861111111111, -1.6997222222222223  
Final bearing: 96.04555555555555

Here is my new code:

from math import *

Aaltitude = 2000
Oppsite  = 20000

lat1 = 53.32055555555556
lat2 = 53.31861111111111
lon1 = -1.7297222222222221
lon2 = -1.6997222222222223

lon1, lat1, lon2, lat2 = map(radians, [lon1, lat1, lon2, lat2])

dlon = lon2 - lon1
dlat = lat2 - lat1
a = sin(dlat/2)**2 + cos(lat1) * cos(lat2) * sin(dlon/2)**2
c = 2 * atan2(sqrt(a), sqrt(1-a))
Base = 6371 * c


Bearing =atan2(cos(lat1)*sin(lat2)-sin(lat1)*cos(lat2)*cos(lon2-lon1), sin(lon2-lon1)*cos(lat2)) 

Bearing = degrees(Bearing)
print ""
print ""
print "--------------------"
print "Horizontal Distance:"
print Base
print "--------------------"
print "Bearing:"
print Bearing
print "--------------------"


Base2 = Base * 1000
distance = Base * 2 + Oppsite * 2 / 2
Caltitude = Oppsite - Aaltitude

a = Oppsite/Base
b = atan(a)
c = degrees(b)

distance = distance / 1000

print "The degree of vertical angle is:"
print c
print "--------------------"
print "The distance between the Balloon GPS and the Antenna GPS is:"
print distance
print "--------------------"
7
  • Python haversine implementation can be found codecodex.com/wiki/…. However for short distance calculations very simple ways exists. Now, what is your maximum distance expected? Are you able to get your co-ordinates in some local cartesian co-ordinate system?
    – eat
    Feb 6, 2011 at 13:15
  • Some implementations in python: - code.activestate.com/recipes/… - platoscave.net/blog/2009/oct/5/… Feb 6, 2011 at 13:40
  • 1
    @James Dyson: with distances like 15km, creat circle doesen't count anything. My suggestion: figure out first the solution with euclidean distances! That will give you a working solution and then later if your distances will be much much longer, then adjust your application. Thanks
    – eat
    Feb 6, 2011 at 22:30
  • 1
    @James Dyson: If your above comment was aimed to me (and at to my earlier suggestion), the answer is surely (and quite 'trivially' as well). I may be able to give some example code, but it won't utilize trigonometry, rather geometry (so I'm unsure if it will help you at all. Are you familiar at all with the concept of vector? In your case positions and directions could be handled most straightforward manner with vectors).
    – eat
    Feb 6, 2011 at 23:04
  • 1
    atan2(sqrt(a), sqrt(1-a)) is the same as asin(sqrt(a))
    – user102008
    Dec 7, 2011 at 1:44

11 Answers 11

297

Here's a Python version:

from math import radians, cos, sin, asin, sqrt

def haversine(lon1, lat1, lon2, lat2):
    """
    Calculate the great circle distance in kilometers between two points 
    on the earth (specified in decimal degrees)
    """
    # convert decimal degrees to radians 
    lon1, lat1, lon2, lat2 = map(radians, [lon1, lat1, lon2, lat2])

    # haversine formula 
    dlon = lon2 - lon1 
    dlat = lat2 - lat1 
    a = sin(dlat/2)**2 + cos(lat1) * cos(lat2) * sin(dlon/2)**2
    c = 2 * asin(sqrt(a)) 
    r = 6371 # Radius of earth in kilometers. Use 3956 for miles. Determines return value units.
    return c * r
13
  • 13
    Could use math.radians() function instead of multiplying by pi/180 - same effect, but a bit more self-documenting. Feb 6, 2011 at 15:10
  • 4
    You can, but if you say import math then you have to specify math.pi, math.sin etc. With from math import * you get direct access to all the module contents. Check out "namespaces" in a python tutorial (such as docs.python.org/tutorial/modules.html) Feb 6, 2011 at 21:20
  • 2
    How come you use atan2(sqrt(a), sqrt(1-a)) instead of just asin(sqrt(a))? Is atan2 more accurate in this case?
    – Eyal
    Jul 25, 2011 at 16:34
  • 4
    If the mean Earth radius is defined as 6371 km, then that is equivalent to 3959 miles, not 3956 miles. See Global average radii for various ways to calculate these values.
    – ekhumoro
    Aug 9, 2017 at 20:59
  • 3
    whats this returning? The bearing or the distance? Jan 13, 2018 at 13:38
18

Most of these answers are "rounding" the radius of the earth. If you check these against other distance calculators (such as geopy), these functions will be off.

This works well:

from math import radians, cos, sin, asin, sqrt

def haversine(lat1, lon1, lat2, lon2):

      R = 3959.87433 # this is in miles.  For Earth radius in kilometers use 6372.8 km

      dLat = radians(lat2 - lat1)
      dLon = radians(lon2 - lon1)
      lat1 = radians(lat1)
      lat2 = radians(lat2)

      a = sin(dLat/2)**2 + cos(lat1)*cos(lat2)*sin(dLon/2)**2
      c = 2*asin(sqrt(a))

      return R * c

# Usage
lon1 = -103.548851
lat1 = 32.0004311
lon2 = -103.6041946
lat2 = 33.374939

print(haversine(lat1, lon1, lat2, lon2))
3
  • 2
    This one is much more accurate then the examples above! Aug 12, 2017 at 15:18
  • 2
    This doesn't address the variation of R. 6356.752 km at the poles to 6378.137 km at the equator
    – ldmtwo
    Jul 1, 2019 at 18:08
  • 3
    Does that error really matter to for your application? cs.nyu.edu/visual/home/proj/tiger/gisfaq.html
    – Tejas Kale
    Dec 17, 2019 at 16:07
12

There is also a vectorized implementation, which allows to use 4 numpy arrays instead of scalar values for coordinates:

def distance(s_lat, s_lng, e_lat, e_lng):

   # approximate radius of earth in km
   R = 6373.0

   s_lat = s_lat*np.pi/180.0                      
   s_lng = np.deg2rad(s_lng)     
   e_lat = np.deg2rad(e_lat)                       
   e_lng = np.deg2rad(e_lng)  

   d = np.sin((e_lat - s_lat)/2)**2 + np.cos(s_lat)*np.cos(e_lat) * np.sin((e_lng - s_lng)/2)**2

   return 2 * R * np.arcsin(np.sqrt(d))
0
10

You can try the haversine package: https://pypi.org/project/haversine/

Example code:

from haversine import haversine
haversine((45.7597, 4.8422),(48.8567, 2.3508), unit='mi')
243.71209416020253
1
  • How can this be used in a Django's ORM query?
    – Gocht
    Aug 21, 2015 at 23:00
5

The bearing calculation is incorrect, you need to swap the inputs to atan2.

    bearing = atan2(sin(long2-long1)*cos(lat2), cos(lat1)*sin(lat2)-sin(lat1)*cos(lat2)*cos(long2-long1))
    bearing = degrees(bearing)
    bearing = (bearing + 360) % 360

This will give you the correct bearing.

1
  • I am actually struggling to understand how these equations were derived as I am reading a paper. You have given me a pointer: haversine formula my first time to hear this, thank you.
    – arilwan
    Sep 3, 2019 at 16:04
4

Here's a numpy vectorized implementation of the Haversine Formula given by @Michael Dunn, gives a 10-50 times improvement over large vectors.

from numpy import radians, cos, sin, arcsin, sqrt

def haversine(lon1, lat1, lon2, lat2):
    """
    Calculate the great circle distance between two points 
    on the earth (specified in decimal degrees)
    """

    #Convert decimal degrees to Radians:
    lon1 = np.radians(lon1.values)
    lat1 = np.radians(lat1.values)
    lon2 = np.radians(lon2.values)
    lat2 = np.radians(lat2.values)

    #Implementing Haversine Formula: 
    dlon = np.subtract(lon2, lon1)
    dlat = np.subtract(lat2, lat1)

    a = np.add(np.power(np.sin(np.divide(dlat, 2)), 2),  
                          np.multiply(np.cos(lat1), 
                                      np.multiply(np.cos(lat2), 
                                                  np.power(np.sin(np.divide(dlon, 2)), 2))))
    c = np.multiply(2, np.arcsin(np.sqrt(a)))
    r = 6371

    return c*r
0
2

You can solve the negative bearing problem by adding 360°. Unfortunately, this might result in bearings larger than 360° for positive bearings. This is a good candidate for the modulo operator, so all in all you should add the line

Bearing = (Bearing + 360) % 360

at the end of your method.

2
  • 2
    I think it's just: Bearing = Bearing % 360 Dec 21, 2015 at 8:59
  • This would be a nice time to use augmented assignment too : Bearing %= 360 Sep 24, 2021 at 13:41
1

The Y in atan2 is, by default, the first parameter. Here is the documentation. You will need to switch your inputs to get the correct bearing angle.

bearing = atan2(sin(lon2-lon1)*cos(lat2), cos(lat1)*sin(lat2)in(lat1)*cos(lat2)*cos(lon2-lon1))
bearing = degrees(bearing)
bearing = (bearing + 360) % 360
1

Refer to this link :https://gis.stackexchange.com/questions/84885/whats-the-difference-between-vincenty-and-great-circle-distance-calculations

this actually gives two ways of getting distance. They are Haversine and Vincentys. From my research I came to know that Vincentys is relatively accurate. Also use import statement to make the implementation.

0

Here are two functions to calculate distance and bearing, which are based on the code in previous messages and https://gist.github.com/jeromer/2005586 (added tuple type for geographical points in lat, lon format for both functions for clarity). I tested both functions and they seem to work right.

#coding:UTF-8
from math import radians, cos, sin, asin, sqrt, atan2, degrees

def haversine(pointA, pointB):

    if (type(pointA) != tuple) or (type(pointB) != tuple):
        raise TypeError("Only tuples are supported as arguments")

    lat1 = pointA[0]
    lon1 = pointA[1]

    lat2 = pointB[0]
    lon2 = pointB[1]

    # convert decimal degrees to radians 
    lat1, lon1, lat2, lon2 = map(radians, [lat1, lon1, lat2, lon2]) 

    # haversine formula 
    dlon = lon2 - lon1 
    dlat = lat2 - lat1 
    a = sin(dlat/2)**2 + cos(lat1) * cos(lat2) * sin(dlon/2)**2
    c = 2 * asin(sqrt(a)) 
    r = 6371 # Radius of earth in kilometers. Use 3956 for miles
    return c * r


def initial_bearing(pointA, pointB):

    if (type(pointA) != tuple) or (type(pointB) != tuple):
        raise TypeError("Only tuples are supported as arguments")

    lat1 = radians(pointA[0])
    lat2 = radians(pointB[0])

    diffLong = radians(pointB[1] - pointA[1])

    x = sin(diffLong) * cos(lat2)
    y = cos(lat1) * sin(lat2) - (sin(lat1)
            * cos(lat2) * cos(diffLong))

    initial_bearing = atan2(x, y)

    # Now we have the initial bearing but math.atan2 return values
    # from -180° to + 180° which is not what we want for a compass bearing
    # The solution is to normalize the initial bearing as shown below
    initial_bearing = degrees(initial_bearing)
    compass_bearing = (initial_bearing + 360) % 360

    return compass_bearing

pA = (46.2038,6.1530)
pB = (46.449, 30.690)

print haversine(pA, pB)

print initial_bearing(pA, pB)
1
  • this method gives other results than all other methods above!
    – basilisk
    Oct 29, 2019 at 16:06
0

Considering that your goal is to measure the distance between two points (represented by geographic coordinates), will leave three options below:

  1. Haversine Formula

  2. Using GeoPy geodesic distance

  3. Using GeoPy great-circle distance


Option 1

Haversine Formula will do the work, however it is important to note that by doing that one is approximating the Earth as a sphere, and that has an error (see this answer) - as Earth is not a sphere.

In order to use the Haversine Formula, first of all, one needs to define the radius of the Earth. This, in itself, may lead to some controversy. Considering the following three sources

I'll be using the value 6371 km as a reference to the radius of the Earth.

# Radius of the Earth
r = 6371.0

We will be leveraging math module.

After the radius, one moves to the coordinates, and one starts by converting the coordinated into radians, in order to use math's trigonometric functions. For that one imports math.radians(x) and use them as follows

#Import radians from math module
from math import radians

# Latitude and Longitude for the First Point (let's consider 40.000º and 21.000º)
lat1 = radians(40.000)
lon1 = radians(21.000)

# Latitude and Longitude for the Second Point (let's consider 30.000º and 25.000º)
lat2 = radians(30.000)
lon2 = radians(25.000)

Now one is ready to apply Haversine Formula. First one subtracts the longitude of point 1 to the longitude of point 2

dlon = lon2 - lon1
dlat = lat2 - lat1

Then, and for here there are a couple of trigonometric functions that one is going to use, more specifically, math.sin(), math.cos(), and math.atan2(). We will also be using math.sqrt()

# Import sin, cos, atan2, and sqrt from math module
from math import sin, cos, atan2, sqrt

a = sin(dlat / 2)**2 + cos(lat1) * cos(lat2) * sin(dlon / 2)**2
c = 2 * atan2(sqrt(a), sqrt(1 - a))
d = r * c

Then one gets the distance by printing d.

As it may help, let's gather everything in a function (inspired by @Michael Dunn's answer)

from math import radians, cos, sin, atan2, sqrt

def haversine(lon1, lat1, lon2, lat2):
    """
    Calculate the great-circle distance (in km) between two points 
    using their longitude and latitude (in degrees).
    """
    # Radius of the Earth
    r = 6371.0

    # Convert degrees to radians 
    # First point
    lat1 = radians(lat1)
    lon1 = radians(lon1)

    # Second Point
    lat2 = radians(lat2)
    lon2 = radians(lon2)

    # Haversine formula 
    dlon = lon2 - lon1 
    dlat = lat2 - lat1 
    a = sin(dlat / 2)**2 + cos(lat1) * cos(lat2) * sin(dlon / 2)**2
    c = 2 * atan2(sqrt(a), sqrt(1 - a)) 
    return r * c

Option 2

One is going to use GeoPy's distance, more specifically, the geodesic.

We can obtain the results both on km, or miles (Source)

# Import Geopy's distance
from geopy import distance

wellington = (-41.32, 174.81)
salamanca = (40.96, -5.50)
print(distance.distance(wellington, salamanca).km) # If one wants in miles, change `km` to `miles`

[Out]: 19959.6792674

Option 3

One is going to use GeoPy's distance, more specifically, the great-circle.

We can obtain the results both on km, or miles (Source)

# Import Geopy's distance
from geopy import distance

newport_ri = (41.49008, -71.312796)
cleveland_oh = (41.499498, -81.695391)

print(distance.great_circle(newport_ri, cleveland_oh).miles) # If one wants in km, change `miles` to `km`

[Out]: 536.997990696
1
  • great circle is usually implemented with haversine. So they could be the same with different radius. Mar 10 at 7:58

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