12

My MVC webapp allows users to add and delete images. The UI calls ImageService.SaveImage(...) in my business layer which internally uses a flag that tells the method to save to either Azure or the file system. I might eventually add S3 to I figure an interface here would work great.

This is what I would imaging the code would look like in my ImageService class. It doesn't care about how the file is saved or where.

// Service the UI uses
public static class ImageService
{
    public static void SaveImage(byte[] data, IImageProvider imageProvider)
    {
        string fileName = "some_generated_name.jpg"
        imageProvider.Save(fileName, data);
    }
}

So I created these implementations

public interface IImageProvider
{
    void Save(string filename, byte[] imageData);
    byte[] Get(string filename);
    void Delete(string filename);
}

// File system implementation
public class FSImageProvider : IImageProvider
{
    public void Delete(string filename)
    {
        File.Delete(filename);
    }

    public byte[] Get( filename)
    {
        return File.ReadAllBytes(filename);
    }

    public void Save(string filename, byte[] imageData)
    {
        File.WriteAllBytes(filename, imageData);
    }
}

// Azure implementation
public class AzureBlobImageProvider : IImageProvider
{
    private string _azureKey = "";
    private string _storageAccountName = "";

    public AzureBlobImageProvider(string azureKey, string storageAccount)
    {
        _azureKey = azureKey;
        _storageAccountName = storageAccount;
    }

    public void Delete(string filename)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public byte[] Get(string filename)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public void Save(string filename, byte[] imageData)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

Question 1) What's the best way to pass in additional info each provider may need? I.e. Azure needs to know container name, blob name(filename), and storageAccount name. S3 may need more as well. A good example is the files path. This could be different for each provider or not exist at all. Azure needs a container name, the file system needs a directory name. If they are different for each provider how would I add that to the interface?

Question 2) Should I use dependency injection to resolve the interface within the ImageService class in the business layer or should I resolve it in the UI and pass it into the class?

3
  • "Container Name", "Storage account" - sounds like configuration data to me. Where would you store config data?
    – Fildor
    Commented Mar 6, 2018 at 15:42
  • @Fildor I would like to store it in the UI's settings file or appSettings. I believe the Services in the business layer need to have them passed in and not stored at that level but not sure. Good question. Commented Mar 6, 2018 at 15:44
  • The question you have to ask now is: how/who/when these specific parameter will be passed? Do you want the caller pass them dynamically? do you want them to be configured to the application? Maybe some parameters are dynamic while other are configured? try to reason with use cases. Commented Mar 10, 2018 at 6:46

7 Answers 7

5

First, you have major architectural disadvantage of passing IImageProvider into SaveImage method. You need this kind of function signature in cases where lifetime of your IImageProvider need to be controllable across methods. In your case you just saving image and pretty much doesn't care about any lifetime of any of your classes, but still using this approach and it will eventually clutter your code, duh - you don't even care about this provider in particular (this is why you wrapping it into interface I presume)

Ask yourself:

"Is my IImageProvider actually used anywhere outside of ImageService? If not, why everyone (methods, classes) need to even know about it's existance?"

Second, instead of creating provider - make your ImageService simple class (remove static), define interface for it, and implement for Azure/FS/etc. For concrete implmentation use factory:

public interface IImageService
{
    void SaveImage(byte[] bytes);
}

public interface IImageServiceFactory
{
    IImageService Create(/*here goes enum, string, connections strings, etc*/);
}


internal sealed class AzureImageService : IImageService {/*implmentation*/}
internal sealed class FileSystemImageService : IImageService {/*implmentation*/}

Overall

Do not pass dependencies in methods. Your methods should look simple, without any clutter like ILogger, IImageProvider, etc that you think is good to pass inside. If you need them at some point in some implementation - just create class which get all dependencies it need through constructor (so static modifier is pretty much always banned and used only for extensions of language). It will be easier for you to manage your depenecies and refactor your code without any colliteral damage of constantly reusing same interface in places where it doesn't even needed.

4
+25

Usually this type of implementation specific data would be provided in the concrete class constructor, just like you did in your example.

I would not create the concrete instances in the UI. You can either use dependency injection or have a single set of factory classes that create the instances with proper configuration. The key point is you want to centralize the configuration of these services into a single location and not have implementation-specific code sprinkled throughout the application.

2
  • I think that might be where my disconnect is. I have all of my services in the business layer, I think of it as an API for my UI to use. Sounds like I should have an interface to the service instead of passing the interface as a param. Could you give an example of the factory pattern? Sounds like even if I didn't move my service to a interface this might solve my current issue Commented Mar 10, 2018 at 4:02
  • Also, my idea was that ImageService knows some other logic not included in each of those IImageProvider implementations would i need to redesign to duplicate that logic in each implementation? Commented Mar 10, 2018 at 4:07
1
  1. You can consider having the extra info for each implementation in a config file, for example in your web app you would have web.config. You can access any of them in any implementation.

  2. I'd suggest using Dependency Injection rather than passing the IImageProvider as parameters. If the logic to resolve the implementation is complicated enough, you can even have a ImageProviderResolver and have your logic to resolve FileImageProvider, AzureImageProvider etc encapsulated there, and just call the resolver to resolve the ImageProvider instance in your ImageService

1

The best way is to make Image service class generic.

    // Service the UI uses
    public class ImageService<T>  where T : class, new()
    {
          public ImageService(T t)
          {
               _imageProvider = t;
          }
          private IImageProvider _imageProvider;
          public void SaveImage(byte[] data, string fileName)
          {
            //string fileName = "some_generated_name.jpg"
            _imageProvider.Save(fileName, data);
          }
    }
1

1) Your problem here is how to create different sub-types for the same interface. You can use creational patterns like Abstract Factory of Builder to address this issue. Both patterns allow you to encapsulate the construction logic of each object differentiating the signature. Encapsulate the creation of each of your ImageProvider into a factory that accepts different parameters according to needs.

2) The problem here is a little wider. You miss a class between the ImageService and the ImageProvider. ImageService have only to receive input from UI and route them to a class that implement the whole saving logic (included where to save). If the user need to decide where to save, then you just have to pass a parameter (enum, string) to the SaveImange method to indicate the target.

The class you miss (lets call it SaveImageCommandHandler) is in charge of 1) create the correct ImageProvider according to parameter, and 2) call Save on that class.

To get an instance of this class on the ImageService you can 1) create it with new or, better 2) inject it in the ImageService constructor or 3) better use a CommandDispatcher that resolve on the fly the dependency.

Your commandhandler will have injected all the factories/builders needed to create all the ImageProvider you need and decides witch one to call according to parameter or your internal logic.

1

You can enable the selection of which image provider to use from your web.config/app.config. Firstly add some appropriate configuration entries:

<configuration>
  <imageProviderConfiguration>
    <imageProvider name="fsImageProvider" />
    <fsImageProvider directory="C:\Images" />
    <azureImageProvider azureKey="foo" storageAccountName="bar" />
  </imageProviderConfiguration>
</configuration>

You will need to include classes to access this information from the config file:

public class ImageProviderSection : ConfigurationSection
{
    public const string ImageProviderConfigurationSection = "imageProviderConfiguration";
    public const string ImageProviderProperty = "imageProvider";
    public const string FSImageProviderProperty = "fsImageProvider";
    public const string AzureImageProviderProperty = "azureImageProvider";

    [ConfigurationProperty(ImageProviderProperty)]
    public ImageProviderElement ImageProvider
    {
        get { return (ImageProviderElement)this[ImageProviderProperty]; }
        set { this[ImageProviderProperty] = value; }
    }

    [ConfigurationProperty(FSImageProviderProperty)]
    public FSImageProviderElement FSImageProvider
    {
        get { return (FSImageProviderElement)this[FSImageProviderProperty]; }
        set { this[FSImageProviderProperty] = value; }
    }

    [ConfigurationProperty(AzureImageProviderProperty)]
    public AzureImageProviderElement AzureImageProvider
    {
        get { return (AzureImageProviderElement)this[AzureImageProviderProperty]; }
        set { this[AzureImageProviderProperty] = value; }
    }
}
public class ImageProviderElement : ConfigurationElement
{
    private const string nameProperty = "name";
    [ConfigurationProperty(nameProperty, IsRequired = true)]
    public string Name
    {
        get { return (string)this[nameProperty]; }
        set { this[nameProperty] = value; }
    }
}
public class FSImageProviderElement : ConfigurationElement
{
    private const string directoryProperty = "directory";
    [ConfigurationProperty(directoryProperty, IsRequired = true)]
    public string Directory
    {
        get { return (string)this[directoryProperty]; }
        set { this[directoryProperty] = value; }
    }
}
public class AzureImageProviderElement : ConfigurationElement
{
    private const string azureKeyProperty = "azureKey";
    private const string storageAccountNameProperty = "storageAccountName";
    [ConfigurationProperty(azureKeyProperty, IsRequired = true)]
    public string AzureKey
    {
        get { return (string)this[azureKeyProperty]; }
        set { this[azureKeyProperty] = value; }
    }
    [ConfigurationProperty(storageAccountNameProperty, IsRequired = true)]
    public string StorageAccountName
    {
        get { return (string)this[storageAccountNameProperty]; }
        set { this[storageAccountNameProperty] = value; }
    }
}

Now you can determine which provider to use in a simple factory class that reads the config file:

public static class ImageProviderFactory
{
    public static IImageProvider GetImageProvider()
    {
        ImageProviderSection imageProviderSection = ConfigurationManager.GetSection(ImageProviderSection.ImageProviderConfigurationSection) as ImageProviderSection;
        switch (imageProviderSection.ImageProvider.Name)
        {
            case ImageProviderSection.FSImageProviderProperty:
                return new FSImageProvider();
            case ImageProviderSection.AzureImageProviderProperty:
                return new AzureImageProvider;
            default:
                throw new Exception("Invalid image provider in configuration");
        }
    }
}

And keep an instance in a static class (or you could setup the dependency injection using similar logic):

public static class Providers
{
    public static IImageProvider ImageProvider { get; } = ImageProviderFactory.GetImageProvider();
}

Each image provider class can access it's related configuration information from the config file:

public interface IImageProvider
{
    void Save(string filename, byte[] imageData);
    byte[] Get(string filename);
    void Delete(string filename);
}

public class FSImageProvider : IImageProvider
{
    private string _directory = string.Empty;
    public FSImageProvider()
    {
        ImageProviderSection imageProviderSection = ConfigurationManager.GetSection(ImageProviderSection.ImageProviderConfigurationSection) as ImageProviderSection;
        _directory = imageProviderSection.FSImageProvider.Directory.Trim();
        if (!_directory.EndsWith("\\"))
            _directory += "\\";
    }

    public void Delete(string filename)
    {
        File.Delete(_directory + filename);
    }

    public byte[] Get(string filename)
    {
        return File.ReadAllBytes(_directory + filename);
    }

    public void Save(string filename, byte[] imageData)
    {
        File.WriteAllBytes(_directory + filename, imageData);
    }
}

public class AzureImageProvider : IImageProvider
{
    private string _azureKey = string.Empty;
    private string _storageAccountName = string.Empty;
    public AzureImageProvider()
    {
        ImageProviderSection imageProviderSection = ConfigurationManager.GetSection(ImageProviderSection.ImageProviderConfigurationSection) as ImageProviderSection;
        _azureKey = imageProviderSection.AzureImageProvider.AzureKey;
        _storageAccountName = imageProviderSection.AzureImageProvider.StorageAccountName;
    }

    public void Delete(string filename)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public byte[] Get(string filename)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public void Save(string filename, byte[] imageData)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

However, if you want to use different image providers depending on certain parameters in the image service, simply remove the imageProvider element from the configuration and change the factory to provide an IImageProvider based (for example) on an enum:

public enum ImageProviders
{
    FileSystem,
    Azure
}
public static class ImageProviderFactory
{
    public static IImageProvider GetImageProvider(ImageProviders provider)
    {
        switch (provider)
        {
            case ImageProviders.FileSystem:
                return new FSImageProvider();
            case ImageProviders.Azure:
                return new AzureImageProvider;
            default:
                throw new Exception("Invalid image provider");
        }
    }
}
-2

In Net.Core

Additional info in the constructor :

services.AddSingleton<FSImageProvider>();

services.AddSingleton<AzureBlobImageProvider>(serviceProvider=>
    {
         return new AzureBlobImageProvider(azureKey,storageAccount);
    }
);

Dependency Injection by key value :

services.AddByName<IImageProvider>()
                .Add<FSImageProvider>("FSImageProvider")
                .Add<AzureBlobImageProvider>("AzureBlobImageProvider")
                .Build();

In the constructor injection :

public constructorxxxx(IServiceByNameFactory<IImageProvider> imageProvider)
{
     IImageProvider fsImageProvider = imageProvider.GetByName("FSImageProvider");
     IImageProvider azureBlobImageProvider =  imageProvider.GetByName("AzureBlobImageProvider");
}

Better use Enum to generate key values of each implementation ("FSImageProvider" and "AzureBlobImageProvider"), don´t use strings directly.

Get the implementation code in : https://github.com/yuriy-nelipovich/DependencyInjection.Extensions

1
  • Using hardcoded string/Enum/whatever in DI container as key is bad design by every possible aspect. I still understand if it would be set of some dynamic dependecies, like plugins or whatever but using it as a key for interface implementation? Use interfaces. They were created for this in the first place.
    – eocron
    Commented Mar 16, 2018 at 19:32

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