16

I'm writing a class overloading the list type. I just wrote this and I'm wondering if there exists any other way less redundant to do it :

class Vector:
    def __mul__(self, other):
        #Vector([1, 2, 3]) * 5 => Vector([5, 10, 15])
        if isinstance(other, int) or isinstance(other, float):
            tmp = list()
            for i in self.l:
                tmp.append(i * other)
            return Vector(tmp)
        raise VectorException("We can only mul a Vector by a scalar")

    def __truediv__(self, other):
        #Vector([1, 2, 3]) / 5 => Vector([0.2, 0.4, 0.6])
        if isinstance(other, int) or isinstance(other, float):
            tmp = list()
            for i in self.l:
                tmp.append(i / other)
            return Vector(tmp)
        raise VectorException("We can only div a Vector by a Scalar")

    def __floordiv__(self, other):
        #Vector([1, 2, 3]) // 2 => Vector([0, 1, 1])
        if isinstance(other, int) or isinstance(other, float):
            tmp = list()
            for i in self.l:
                tmp.append(i // other)
            return Vector(tmp)
        raise VectorException("We can only div a Vector by a Scalar")

As you can see, every overloaded method is a copy/paste of the previous with just small changes.

11
  • 2
    Why don't you use list comprehensions? return Vector(i*other for i in self.l) is much more compact than your four lines. As for isinstance, why not let Python itself raise TypeError?
    – DYZ
    Commented Mar 6, 2018 at 23:50
  • 1
    This is a good place to use the Strategy pattern.
    – munk
    Commented Mar 6, 2018 at 23:51
  • 20
    The less redundant way is to import numpy
    – wim
    Commented Mar 6, 2018 at 23:53
  • 5
    I believe the "correct" way to do these is to return NotImplemented instead of raising the error, check out here Commented Mar 7, 2018 at 0:02
  • 2
    Don't edit your question in a way that completely invalidates the answers. You asked a question. Don't then edit the question to make the answers nonsensical. I've rolled your question back to its original form and readded the tag that smci added; in the future, don't do that again.
    – anon
    Commented Mar 7, 2018 at 5:19

4 Answers 4

19

Factorize code using decorator design pattern and lambda function:

class Vector:
    def __do_it(self, other, func):
        if isinstance(other, int) or isinstance(other, float):
            tmp = list()
            for i in self.l:
                tmp.append(func(i, other))
            return Vector(tmp)
        raise ValueError("We can only operate a Vector by a scalar")

    def __mul__(self, other):
        return self.__do_it(other, lambda i, o: i * o)

    def __truediv__(self, other):
        return self.__do_it(other, lambda i, o: i / o)

    def __floordiv__(self, other):
        return self.__do_it(other, lambda i, o: i // o)
18

What you want to do here is dynamically generate the methods. There are multiple ways to do this, from going super-dynamic and creating them on the fly in a metaclass's __getattribute__ (although that doesn't work for some special methods—see the docs) to generating source text to save in a .py file that you can then import. But the simplest solution is to create them in the class definition, something like this:

class MyVector:
    # ...

    def _make_op_method(op):
        def _op(self, other):
            if isinstance(other, int) or isinstance(other, float):
                tmp = list()
                for i in self.l:
                    tmp.append(op(i. other))
                return Vector(tmp)
            raise VectorException("We can only {} a Vector by a scalar".format(
                op.__name__.strip('_'))
        _.op.__name__ = op.__name__
        return _op

    __mul__ = _make_op(operator.__mul__)
    __truediv__ = _make_op(operator.__truediv__)
    # and so on

You can get fancier and set _op.__doc__ to an appropriate docstring that you generate (see functools.wraps in the stdlib for some relevant code), and build __rmul__ and __imul__ the same way you build __mul__, and so on. And you can write a metaclass, class decorator, or function generator that wraps up some of the details if you're going to be doing many variations of the same thing. But this is the basic idea.

In fact, moving it outside the class makes it easier to eliminate even more repetition. Just define that _op(self, other, op) method in the class instead of locally inside _make_op and decorate the class with @numeric_ops, which you can define like this:

def numeric_ops(cls):
    for op in "mul truediv floordiv".split():  # "mul truediv floordiv ... ".split():
        def _op(self, other):
            return self._op(other, getattr(operator, op)
        _op.__name__ = f"__{op}__"
        setattr(cls, f"__{op}__", _op)

If you look at, e.g., functions.total_ordering, it does something similar to generate any missing ordering ops out of the ones that are there.

The operator.mul, etc., come from the operator module in the stdlib—they're just trivial functions where operator.__mul__(x, y) basically just calls x * y, and so on, made for when you need to pass around an operator expression as a function.

There are some examples of this kind of code in the stdlib—although far more examples of the related but much simpler __rmul__ = __mul__.

The key here is that there's no difference between names you create with def and names you create by assigning with =. Either way, __mul__ becomes an attribute of the class, and its value is a function that does what you want. (And, similarly, there’s almost no difference between names you create during class definition and names you inject afterward.)


So, should you be doing this?

Well, DRY is important. If you copy-paste-edit a dozen times it’s not unlikely that you’ll screw up one of the edits and end up with a mod method that actually multiples and that (and a unit test that doesn’t catch it). And then, if you later discover a flaw in the implementation you copied and pasted a dozen times (as between the original and edited version of the question), you have to fix the same flaw in a dozen places, which is yet another potential bug magnet.

On the other hand, readability counts. If you don't understand how that works, you probably shouldn't be doing this, and should settle for Ramazan Polat's answer. (It's not quite as compact, or as efficient, but it's surely easier to understand.) After all, if the code isn’t obvious to you, the fact that you only have to fix a bug once instead of a dozen times is swamped by the fact that you don’t know how to fix it. And even if you do understand it, the cost of cleverness can often outweigh the benefits of DRY.

I think total_ordering shows about where you’d want to draw the line. If you’re doing this one time, you’re better off with the repetition, but if you’re doing it for multiple classes or in multiple projects, you’re probably better off abstracting the cleverness into a library that you can write once, exhaustive test with a variety of different classes, and then use over and over.

12
  • 2
    The metaclass __getattribute__ approach wouldn't work; magic method lookup ignores that. Commented Mar 7, 2018 at 0:09
  • 1
    Probably want to pass operator.mul instead of operator.__mul_ Commented Mar 7, 2018 at 0:11
  • @juanpa.arrivillaga Why? Try operator.__mul__ is operator.mul. They're the exact same object. And I think __mul__ is clearer for this case, because (a) we're implementing a __mul__ method, and (b) it makes it more obvious that we're doing something that involves implementation stuff.
    – abarnert
    Commented Mar 7, 2018 at 0:11
  • 1
    This code block should be within some class block, right? I think, assuming I understand correctly, that this would be much easier to read it you added that one line and an extra level of indentation, to see that you’re doing that assignment within the class definition. (And if you aren’t doing it within a class’s block, then this answer leaves me quite confused as to how these operators are getting assigned to the class.)
    – KRyan
    Commented Mar 7, 2018 at 13:42
  • 1
    @RamazanPolat That's the point of the conclusion: it's probably only worth doing this kind of cleverness if you can abstract that cleverness away into a library. Which is exactly what the Python stdlib does—see the dynamic but trickily clever code in the reusable total_ordering decorator vs. the simpler but more repetitive code in some of the collections classes. (it's also why I upvoted your answer, and recommended it in my conclusion.) All that being said, it's worth learning how to read and understand this code (even if you're never going to write it).
    – abarnert
    Commented Mar 8, 2018 at 18:56
9

Your code could be as compact as below (juanpa.arrivillaga suggested to return NotImplemented instead of raising an exception):

def __mul__(self, other):
    #Vector([1, 2, 3]) * 5 => Vector([5, 10, 15])
    try:
        return Vector([i * other for i in self.l])
    except TypeError:
        return NotImplemented
1
  • 5
    This is all true, but it doesn't answer the question. You're still copying and pasting the same implementation, with one character changed for each version. And, if fact, your changes show exactly why that's a problem: because if he wants to make the fixes you're suggesting, he has to make those same fixes in every one of the methods. What are the odds that he'll make a typo in one of them and not catch it until after he's created reams of buggy output?
    – abarnert
    Commented Mar 7, 2018 at 0:08
7

The Strategy pattern is your friend here. I'll also touch on a couple of other ways you can clean up code.

You can read about the strategy pattern here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strategy_pattern

You said "As you can see, every overloaded method is a copy/paste of the previous with just small changes." This is your hint to use this pattern. If you can make the small change into a function, then you can write the boilerplate code once and focus on the interesting parts.

class Vector:
    def _arithmitize(self, other, f, error_msg):
        if isinstance(other, int) or isinstance(other, float):
            tmp = list()
            for a in self.l:
                tmp.append(func(a, other))
            return Vector(tmp)
        raise ValueError(error_msg)

    def _err_msg(self, op_name):
        return "We can only {} a vector by a scalar".format(opp_name)

    def __mul__(self, other):
        return self._arithmitize(
            other, 
            lambda a, b: a * b, 
            self._err_msg('mul'))

    def __div__(self, other):
        return self._arithmitize(
            other, 
            lambda a, b: a / b, 
            self._err_msg('div'))
    # and so on ...

We can clean this up a little more with a list comprehension

class Vector:
    def _arithmetize(self, other, f, error_msg):
        if isinstance(other, int) or isinstance(other, float):
            return Vector([f(a, other) for a in self.l])
        raise ValueError(error_msg)

    def _err_msg(self, op_name):
        return "We can only {} a vector by a scalar".format(opp_name)

    def __mul__(self, other):
        return self._arithmetize(
            other, 
            lambda a, b: a * b, 
            self._err_msg('mul'))

    def __div__(self, other):
        return self._arithmetize(
            other, 
            lambda a, b: a / b, 
            self._err_msg('div'))

We can improve the type check

import numbers

class Vector:
    def _arithmetize(self, other, f, error_msg):
        if isinstance(other, number.Numbers):
            return Vector([f(a, other) for a in self.l])
        raise ValueError(error_msg)

We can use operators instead of writing lambdas:

import operators as op

class Vector:
    # snip ...
    def __mul__(self, other):
        return self._arithmetize(other, op.mul, self._err_msg('mul'))

So we end up with something like this:

import numbers
import operators as op

class Vector(object):
    def _arithmetize(self, other, f, err_msg):
        if isinstance(other, numbers.Number):
            return Vector([f(a, other) for a in self.l])
        raise ValueError(self._error_msg(err_msg))
    def _error_msg(self, msg):
        return "We can only {} a vector by a scalar".format(opp_name)

    def __mul__(self, other):
        return self._arithmetize(op.mul, other, 'mul')

    def __truediv__(self, other):
        return self._arithmetize(op.truediv, other, 'truediv')

    def __floordiv__(self, other):
        return self._arithmetize(op.floordiv, other, 'floordiv')

    def __mod__(self, other):
        return self._arithmetize(op.mod, other, 'mod')

    def __pow__(self, other):
        return self._arithmetize(op.pow, other, 'pow')

There are other ways you might dynamically generate these, but for a small set of functions like this, readability counts.

If you need to generate these dynamically, try something like this:

class Vector(object):
    def _arithmetize(....):
        # you've seen this already 

    def __getattr__(self, name):
        funcs = {
            '__mul__': op.mul, # note: this may not actually work with dunder methods. YMMV
            '__mod__': op.mod,
            ...
        }
        def g(self, other):
            try:
                return self._arithmetize(funcs[name],...)
             except:
                 raise NotImplementedError(...)
        return g

If you find this dynamic example does not work, check out make operators overloading less redundant in python?, which handles the case of dynamically creating dunder_methods in most python implementations.

5
  • 2
    In you penultimate example, you don't need the err_msg argument to arithimitize - you can use f.__name__ instead. (i.e. op.mul.__name__ is "mul"). Commented Mar 7, 2018 at 13:19
  • 2
    Also, it should be "arithmetize" (names are important) Commented Mar 7, 2018 at 13:20
  • The last version sadly won't work. Well, it won't work in CPython, and probably won't work in any Python; the rules for special method lookup are (intentionally) vague. But unless you're writing, e.g., a proxy class that lazily generates methods the first time they're called, creating them at class creation time (as with total_ordering, or my answer) rather than lookup time is usually all the dynamicness you need, and more efficient and easier to reason about (if a bit more verbose and harder to initially code up), so this limitation usually isn't a problem.
    – abarnert
    Commented Mar 8, 2018 at 19:08
  • @abarnert that's a good point. I've left a comment in there with a link to your answer. I think this still works if you need to implement some other interface that's not using special method names, so I've left it otherwise in place.
    – munk
    Commented Mar 8, 2018 at 19:17
  • 1
    @munk: Yeah, if it didn't work for non-special-method names, __getattr__ and __getattribute__ wouldn't exist. And dynamic proxies (for bridges, ORMs, RPCs, etc.) often need it. I wasn't suggesting you remove it from your answer, just making a comment.
    – abarnert
    Commented Mar 8, 2018 at 19:19

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