4

I'm trying to clean up data in a PostgreSQL table, where some records have a large number of profanities in the email_address column (the records in question have been entered by agitated users as a result of frustration due to a bug that has since been fixed):

    ┌───────────────────┐
    │   email_address   │
    ├───────────────────┤
    │ foo@go.bar.me.net │
    │ foo@foo.com       │
    │ foo@example.com   │
    │ baz@example.com   │
    │ barred@qux.com    │
    └───────────────────┘

Desired query output

I'd like to build a query that annotates each row from the data table with a profanity score, and orders the records by the score, so that a human can go through the annotated data (presented in a web app) and take necessary action:

    ┌───────────────────┬───────┐
    │ email_address     │ score │
    ├───────────────────┼───────┤
    │ foo@foo.com       │    18 │
    │ foo@go.bar.me.net │    14 │
    │ foo@example.com   │     9 │
    │ baz@example.com   │     3 │
    │ barred@qux.com    │     0 │
    └───────────────────┴───────┘

Attempt #1

The approach I'm taking is to build a list of regular expressions (now I have 2 problems...) and scores, whereby very profane words will contribute a large profanity score if that word is found in the email_address column. My profanities table looks something like this:

    ┌──────────────────┬───────┐
    │ profanity_regexp │ score │
    ├──────────────────┼───────┤
    │ foo              │     9 │
    │ bar(?!red)       │     5 │
    │ baz              │     3 │
    └──────────────────┴───────┘

LATERAL JOIN

I've found that I can use a LATERAL join over the regexp_matches function to extract all profanities from each email_address (but records with no profanities are discarded):

SELECT
    data.email_address,
    array_agg(matches)
FROM
    data,
    profanities p,
    LATERAL regexp_matches(data.email_address, p.posix_regexp, 'gi') matches
GROUP BY
    data.email_address;

This produces the following result:

    ┌───────────────────┬───────────────────┐
    │   email_address   │ profanities_found │
    ├───────────────────┼───────────────────┤
    │ foo@foo.com       │ {{foo},{foo}}     │
    │ foo@example.com   │ {{foo}}           │
    │ foo@go.bar.me.net │ {{foo},{bar}}     │
    │ baz@example.com   │ {{baz}}           │
    └───────────────────┴───────────────────┘

SUB-SELECT

I also figured out how to get an array of profanity score subtotals for each record with this SQL:

SELECT
    data.email_address,
    array(
        SELECT score * ( 
            SELECT COUNT(*)
            FROM (SELECT
                regexp_matches(data.email_address, p.posix_regexp, 'gi')
            ) matches
        )
        FROM profanities p
    ) prof
from data;

Which correctly yields all rows (including rows without profanities) as such:

    ┌───────────────────┬──────────┐
    │   email_address   │   prof   │
    ├───────────────────┼──────────┤
    │ foo@go.bar.me.net │ {9,5,0}  │
    │ foo@foo.com       │ {18,0,0} │
    │ foo@example.com   │ {9,0,0}  │
    │ baz@example.com   │ {0,0,3}  │
    │ barred@qux.com    │ {0,0,0}  │
    └───────────────────┴──────────┘

Problem

How do I sum the result of a lateral join to get the desired output?

Is there another strategy I can use to get the desired result?


I've posted a live code fiddle for this question at http://sqlfiddle.com/#!17/6685c/4

1

Add another select to your query. The current query is fine but you just need to sum the array.

SELECT email_address,
(
    SELECT SUM(s)
    FROM
        UNNEST(prof.profanity_score_subtotals) s
) AS sum_prof FROM (
    SELECT
        data.email_address,
        array(
            SELECT score * ( 
                SELECT COUNT(*)
                FROM (SELECT
                    regexp_matches(data.email_address, p.profanity_regexp, 'gi')
                ) matches
            )
            FROM profanities p
        ) profanity_score_subtotals
    FROM data
) prof;
  • I'm having trouble getting this to work, though I understand using UNNEST is the key to your answer, combined with the sub-select query I posted in the question. My interpretation of your answer is at sqlfiddle.com/#!17/6685c/17 -- want to expand your answer? – Tyson Mar 7 '18 at 9:23
  • I took a look at the fiddle. Maybe I misunderstood your requirements but it seems to be working fine. The final query outputs exactly the desired output. – Petru Scurtu Mar 7 '18 at 9:53
  • Weird - I looked again and indeed it works. I've no idea why it wasn't working earlier. Thanks! – Tyson Mar 7 '18 at 14:58
1

For some reason postgres doesn't allow you to use set-returning functions as part of a where clause, so you need to do two lateral joins:

SELECT
    data.email_address,
    t.score
FROM
    data,
    LATERAL (
        SELECT
            coalesce(sum(s.score), 0) AS score
        FROM
            profanities,
            LATERAL (
                SELECT
                    profanities.score * array_length(
                        regexp_matches(
                            data.email_address,
                            profanities.profanity_regexp,
                            'gi'
                        ),
                        1
                    ) score
            ) s
    ) t;
  • I like this answer better as it worked out of the box, and it uses lateral joins as asked in the title of the question. – Tyson Mar 7 '18 at 15:11
  • Turns out the extra LATERAL join isn't necessary, see my answer for a slightly faster solution. – Tyson Mar 8 '18 at 6:40
0

I had previously accepted the answer by @daurnimator, but then found the extra LATERAL join isn't necessary. Here's what I ended up using in my app:

SELECT
    data.email_address,
    (
        SELECT
            coalesce(sum(s.score), 0) AS score
        FROM
            profanities,
            LATERAL (
                SELECT
                    profanities.score * array_length(
                        regexp_matches(
                            data.email_address,
                            profanities.profanity_regexp,
                            'gi'
                        ),
                        1
                    ) score
            ) s
    ) AS score
FROM
    data;

It also turns out my version is slightly faster since it avoids a nested loop in the query. Another advantage is that it can be used as an annotation with Django's RawSQL function in my application, allowing me to then order_by('-score') and show the most profane entries first.

  • 1
    Usually you'd want to use the score as an additional filter; e.g. only return email addresses where the score is at least 50. With my approach you're able to use that in the where clause. Of course you could move your query to a subselect..... – daurnimator Mar 8 '18 at 9:54

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