In XS I can pass the length of a string argument to a C function using the length keyword:

static int foo(const char *s, size_t len)
{
    return 1;
}

MODULE = Foo        PACKAGE = Foo

void
foo(char *s, STRLEN length(s))

However how can I get the length of the string if I need it inside the CODE block?

void
foo(char *s, STRLEN length(s))
CODE:
    ...
    foo(s, ???);

I can use STRLEN_length_of_s or XSauto_length_of_s variable autogenerated by xsubpp but it feels a bit hardcoded. Is there a way (possibly a predefined macro) I can use to get the variable name? Or can I assign my own name to the length argument? Or do I need to resort to declaring the argument as SV * and then get the length myself with SvPV in CODE section?

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First of all, if you're using char* in your XS prototype (and the default typemap), your code is buggy.

You want

void
foo(SV* sv)
PREINIT:
    STRLEN len;
    char* s;
CODE:
    s = SvPVbyte(sv, len);
    foo(s, len);

or

void
foo(SV* sv)
PREINIT:
    STRLEN len;
    char* s;
CODE:
    s = SvPVutf8(sv, len);
    foo(s, len);

Remember that Perl strings are sequences of 32-bit or 64-bit numbers, while C strings are sequences of 8-bit chars.[1] Some conversion needs to occur, and you need to specify which one.

In the first case, each character of the string will be a char of s.

In the second case, s will be provided the Perl string encoded using utf8.


  1. Technically, a char can be larger than 8 bits, but I don't think it can be on systems supported by perl.
  • You are saying that one should always explicitly choose between byte or utf-8 representation depending on the underlying C function? The default typemap uses SvPV which is not suitable for representing strings, right? So your preferred way is to work directly with SV in argument and retrieve the pointer and length in the PREINIT section. The length keyword is not the right way to do it, I assume. – manison Mar 7 at 18:47
  • 1
    Re "You are saying that one should always explicitly choose between byte or utf-8 representation depending on the underlying C function?", There's a third option: Using SvPV along with SvUTF8 to determine the encoding of the buffer returned by SvPV. – ikegami Mar 7 at 19:22
  • 1
    Re "The default typemap uses SvPV which is not suitable for representing strings, right?", When using SvPV without SvUTF8, you don't know what you have. For example, "\xE9" in Perl could equally result in "\xE9\x00" or "\xC3\xA9\x00" in C when using SvPV. – ikegami Mar 7 at 19:25
  • 1
    Re "So your preferred way", Adjusting the typemap is equally acceptable. – ikegami Mar 7 at 19:25
  • I had to move the SvPVxxx call into the INIT section, since in the PREINIT the SV argument is not popped from the stack yet, causing the 'sv' was not declared in this scope error. – manison Mar 8 at 7:41

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.