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As a hypothetical question, I would like to use lambdas as class methods. I understand this is bad in a professional context, but I'm curious anyway. An example would probably be best for showing what I want to do. Here is a basic class for complex numbers:

class Complex {
    private:
        double re, im;
    public:
        Complex() : re(0.0), im(0.0) {}
        Complex(double re, double im) : re(re * 1.0), im(im * 1.0) {}
        Complex(const Complex &c) = default;

        ~Complex() = default;

        function<double(void)> getRe = [=]() -> double { return re; };
        function<void(double)> setRe = [&](double re) -> void { this->re = re; };

        function<double(void)> getIm = [=]() -> double { return im; };
        function<void(double)> setIm = [&](double im) -> void { this->im = im; };

};

At first I have tried using auto instead of explicitly specifying function types but I got errors saying that I cant use auto in non static fields.

This seems to actually work, as in it apparently produces the desired behaviour. I have used it to draw some fractals using OpenGL so it ends up doing some fairly intensive work.

As I said it seems to work, I have used reference capture for the setters especially since I figured that since this is a reference to the current instance it might be needed, and value capture for the getters since by default an identifier ends up searching(in this case) in the class scope and finds the fields.

I have 2 questions:

  1. I have not tested this with visual studio but in what I am using, CLion with the MSVC compiler, the this is highlighted as as an inexistent variable(even though it "works"). Any ideas why this happens?

  2. The class ends up being slow. As in more than an order of magnitude slower. The rendering goes from being absolutely instant when I use plain getters and setters like double getRe() {return re;}, to taking 2-3 seconds. Why does this happen?

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    Note that a std::function is not a lambda. It's a type-erased function-like type which can hold a lambda
    – Justin
    Mar 7, 2018 at 19:10
  • Also, std::function is mutable, so other code can replace these methods with arbitrary other methods. Mar 7, 2018 at 19:11
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    What is benefit of using lambda vs regular methods here?
    – Slava
    Mar 7, 2018 at 19:15
  • 1
    In your code, every instance has its own huge std::function members. If you use some dynamic allocation for this class, the slow-down is very likely caused by more memory allocation. In the ordinary case, those function addresses are hardcoded to assembly.
    – llllllllll
    Mar 7, 2018 at 19:18
  • 1
    Note: if you are going to have a public getter and setter methods that do not do anything to protect the member or otherwise supply some added value you are only marginally better off than having a public member. Any fool can use the getter to see the value and the setter to change the member to any value they chose undetected just like a public member. What you do get is a place to put a debugger breakpoint to try and see who the fool is. Mar 7, 2018 at 19:39

2 Answers 2

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I like the idea, but it doesn't work out so well in practice.

std::function is a class type, like any other custom class you might write. sizeof(std::function) varies from implementation to implementation, but a reasonable value is 24 bytes1. This means that you'd be adding 24 bytes to sizeof(Complex) for every member std::function you want to add, compared to adding 0 bytes for every member function. Compared to sizeof(double) == 8 on most machines, that's a lot of overhead: your Complex type could be 16 bytes but is instead roughly 112 bytes.

Furthermore, every std::function member has to be initialized, possibly requiring a heap allocation, and calling a std::function involves virtual functions (or equivalent) because of type erasure. This makes it really hard for the compiler to optimize and nearly impossible for the compiler to inline the functions, whereas the regular member functions are almost guaranteed to be inlined due to how simple they are.

Using std::function for member functions means that your type is uselessly bigger, takes more work to initialize, and is much harder to optimize. That's why it's so much slower.

1: At this time, sizeof(std::function) is actually 32 bytes, 48 bytes, and 64 bytes on libstdc++, libc++, and MSVC's STL respectively


To avoid the per-object overhead, you could have static constexpr members (at least in C++17), but then you'd have to have an explicit this parameter, which removes all the nice sugar that member functions have. You'd have to write Complex::getRe(myComplex) rather than myComplex.getRe()

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    The idea of having explicit this parameter has made it's way into C++23. It has some good use cases like deduplication of cont and non-const member functions and easier CRTP. But, if you use it, you have to use self inside the function to access other members (similar to as in Python3). Jan 30, 2023 at 7:49
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Let me fix this code for you:

struct Complex {
    double re, im;
    Complex() : re(0.0), im(0.0) {}
    Complex(double re, double im) : re(re * 1.0), im(im * 1.0) {}
    Complex(const Complex &c) = default;

    ~Complex() = default;
};

Exactly the same outcome, better readability, smaller memory footprint. Go for it. You code is also pretty terrible for const-correctness.

And yes, your code is so terribly slow because of multiple factors:

  • Your calling to methods is now virtualized, so they are not inlined, you end up being penalized terribly for this
  • Your object creation/destruction now is very likely to incur dynamic memory allocations/deallocations
  • Your objects have no become bigger, so more cache misses
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  • 7
    This doesn't address the question. OP indicates that he knows his idea is not optimal. This question is asking to clarification on specific issues regarding loss of performance caused his sub-optimal design. Mar 7, 2018 at 19:22
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    @FrançoisAndrieux, it is an old joke I love, about the patient who visits the doctor and asks 'Doctor, when I stick a nail into my ear it hurts terribly, what should I do?' And the good doctor replies - 'Don't stick nails into your ears'. Same here. All this suffering is for nothing, so best way to avoid the suffering is not to cause it.
    – SergeyA
    Mar 7, 2018 at 19:25
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    But there is no suffering here, it's a question about explaining observations. Trying to understand why bad code is bad, or what makes bad code bad is a worthwhile pursuit. When asking "What makes this code bad?", the answer "It's bad, don't do that." is very not very helpful. Mar 7, 2018 at 19:28
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    @SergeyA Hey, sorry but Francois is right how does this actually add anything constructive to the question? I know its not optimal, obviously. There is no question that the code is bad, and I have already stated that I dont intend to write actual code like that. I also think, and have found out by myself that that code is bad as hell. But as other have said, my question is simply about C++ internals, what happens under the hood that makes it bad. What makes me curious about this is simply that that code looks cool and it makes me curious about what going on under the hood. Nothing more.
    – Rares Dima
    Mar 7, 2018 at 19:41
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    @RaresDima I would imagine, my latest edit should address those questions?
    – SergeyA
    Mar 7, 2018 at 21:10

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