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Context: I'm building a collections management app for museums. Every entity has a Museum property to tie that entity to the appropriate museum. A user from a given museum should be able to maintain a lexicon through the app for things such as Genres. Likewise, museums can maintain a list of Artists. Watered-down versions of the relevant classes and a diagram of the database so far is below:

public class Museum
{
    public Museum()
    {
        Artists = new List<Artist>();
        Genres = new List<Genre>();
    }

    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public List<Artist> Artists { get; set; }
    public List<Genre> Genres { get; set; }
}

public class Artist
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public Museum Museum { get; set; }
    public int MuseumId { get; set; }
}

public class Genre
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public Museum Museum { get; set; }
    public int MuseumId { get; set; }
}

Database Diagram

Problem: An artist creates works in a variety of genres, so an artist has many genres. Likewise, a genre is used by many artists. So here I need a many-to-many relationship which I can achieve through EFCore by explicitly defining a joining entity - ArtistGenre. Updated code below:

public class Artist
{
    public Artist()
    {
        ArtistGenres = new List<ArtistGenre>();
    }

    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public Museum Museum { get; set; }
    public int MuseumId { get; set; }
    public List<ArtistGenre> ArtistGenres { get; set; }
}

public class Genre
{
    public Genre()
    {
        ArtistGenres = new List<ArtistGenre>();
    }

    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public Museum Museum { get; set; }
    public int MuseumId { get; set; }
    public List<ArtistGenre> ArtistGenres { get; set; }
}

public class ArtistGenre
{
    public Artist Artist { get; set; }
    public int ArtistId { get; set; }
    public Genre Genre { get; set; }
    public int GenreId { get; set; }
}

And the obligatory: modelBuilder.Entity<ArtistGenre>().HasKey(a => new { a.ArtistId, a.GenreId }); in OnModelCreating in my DbContext. But this results in a situation where there are multiple cascade delete paths to the same entity:

Introducing FOREIGN KEY constraint 'FK_ArtistGenre_Genres_GenreId' on table 'ArtistGenre' may cause cycles or multiple cascade paths. Specify ON DELETE NO ACTION or ON UPDATE NO ACTION, or modify other FOREIGN KEY constraints. Could not create constraint or index. See previous errors.

Is there a trick to getting this to work? Have I designed this wrong? In the end, I'd like to be able to delete a Museum and have all related Genres and Artists (and ArtistGenres) get deleted automatically.

UPDATE

I've been experimenting with different configurations, and I've discovered that if I remove the cascading deletes from ArtistGenre like so:

protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    modelBuilder.Entity<ArtistGenre>()
        .HasOne(a => a.Artist)
        .WithMany(m => m.ArtistGenres)
        .OnDelete(DeleteBehavior.Restrict);

    modelBuilder.Entity<ArtistGenre>()
        .HasOne(a => a.Genre)
        .WithMany(g => g.ArtistGenres)
        .OnDelete(DeleteBehavior.Restrict);
}

Then I'm able to update the database with the junction table, but I don't get the desired cascading delete effect. If I add a Musuem and MuseumId property to ArtistGenre like so:

public class ArtistGenre
{
    public Museum Museum { get; set; }
    public int MuseumId { get; set; }
    public Artist Artist { get; set; }
    public int ArtistId { get; set; }
    public Genre Genre { get; set; }
    public int GenreId { get; set; }
}

I can delete a Museum and have all dependent entities (Artist, Genre, and ArtistGenre) automatically deleted. However, I still can't delete an Artist or Genre without first deleting any records where their IDs appear in ArtistGenre.

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The report about the cascading is not caused by the Many-to-Many relation between Artists and Genres, but by the one-to-many relations Museum - Artists and Museum - Genres.

The error means that if you would Remove a Museum it would automatically Remove its Artists and its Genres. While deleting a Genre all Artists performing in this Genre should be adjusted, but you are also Deleting Artists because of the removal of the Museum, so we are removing in a Circle.

You can see that the one-to-many relation with the Museum is the problem, by removing the Museum from your DbContext and creating a standard many-to-many between Artists and Genres. This works fine without any attributes or fluent API.

So you have to promise the model builder that you will only remove museums that have no Artists nor Genres anymore. You'll have to remove the Artists and Genres exhibited in a Museum before you can remove the Museum.

I also saw some other strange things which are not necessary using entity framework. I'm not sure if they are needed because of ef-core.

For instance, your Museums has a List of Artists, are you sure that Artists[17] is a meaningful Action? And why are you creating those Lists in the constructor? If you fetch an Artist from the database, these Lists are created by the constructor and immediately replaced by the data retrieved from the database. Thirdly: are these Lists really Lists, or are they merely interfaces to some data fetched from the database? Could it be that the ICollection functionality of the Museum's Artists and Genres is all funcitonality you'll ever use, or do you really plan to use functionality provided by an IList?

If you stick to the entity framework code first conventions, entity framework is perfectly able to determine your primary and foreign keys and relations between tables just by looking at the properties of your classes.

The only thing that entity framework can't detect automatically is that you promise to remove only Museums without Genres and without Artists.

I have tested this all using the following classes:

class Museum
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }

    // every Museum has zero or more Artists (one-to-many)
    public virtual ICollection<Artist> Artists { get; set; }

    // every Museum has zero or more Genres (one-to-many)
    public virtual ICollection<Genre> Genres { get; set; }
}

Artists:

class Artist
{
    public int Id { get; set; }

    // every Artist belongs to one Museum using foreign key:
    public int MuseumId { get; set; }
    public virtual Museum Museum { get; set; }

    // every Artist creates work in zero or more Genres (many-to-many)
    public virtual ICollection<Genre> Genres { get; set; }

    public string Name { get; set; }
}

Genres:

class Genre
{
    public int Id { get; set; }

    // every Genre belongs to only one Museum using foreign key
    public int MuseumId { get; set; }
    public virtual Museum Museum { get; set; }

    // every Genre is performed by zero or more Artists (many-to-many)
    public virtual ICollection<Artist> Artists { get; set; }

    public string Name { get; set; }
}

Finally the DbContext

class MuseumContext : DbContext
{
    public DbSet<Museum> Museums { get; set; }
    public DbSet<Artist> Artists { get; set; }
    public DbSet<Genre> Genres { get; set; }
}

Because I stuck to the code-first conventions, this was all that entity framework needed to know to configure the primary and foreign keys, and the one-to-many relations. It even creates an extra junction table for you to represent the many-to-many relation between Artists and Genres.

The only thing we need to do is to tell the modelBuilder not to Cascade On Delete:

protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    var museumEntity = modelBuilder.Entity<Museum>();

    museumEntity.HasMany(museum => museum.Genres)
        .WithRequired(genre => genre.Museum)
        .HasForeignKey(genre => genre.MuseumId)
        .WillCascadeOnDelete(false);

    museumEntity.HasMany(museum => museum.Artists)
        .WithRequired(artist => artist.Museum)
        .HasForeignKey(artist => artist.MuseumId)
        .WillCascadeOnDelete(false);

    base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);
}

This means: every Museum has a property Genres. Every element in Genre has a non-null Museum, meaning that every Genre is attached to exactly one Museum (nor zero, not two). This attachment is done by the foreign key MuseumId. If you plan to delete a Museum, the database should not delete all its Genres

As a result Genre.MuseumId may not be zero, nor can you delete a Museum while there are still Genres with a MuseumId pointing to this Museum.

I tested this as follows:

Database.SetInitializer<MuseumContext>(new DropCreateDatabaseIfModelChanges<MuseumContext>());

using (var dbContext = new MuseumContext())
{
    Genre goldenAge = dbContext.Genres.Add(new Genre() { Name = "Dutch Golden Age Painting" });
    Genre renaissance = dbContext.Genres.Add(new Genre() { Name = "Early Renaissance" });
    Genre portrets = dbContext.Genres.Add(new Genre() { Name = "Portrets" });
    Genre popArt = dbContext.Genres.Add(new Genre() { Name = "Pop Art" });

    // The RijksMuseum Amsterdam has a Collection of several genres,
    Museum rijksMuseum = dbContext.Museums.Add(new Museum()
    {
        Name = "RijksMuseum Amsterdam",
        Genres = new List<Genre>()
        {
            goldenAge,
            renaissance,
            portrets,
        },
    });

    // Rembrandt van Rijn can be seen in the Rijksmuseum:
    Artist artist = dbContext.Artists.Add(new Artist()
    {
        Name = "Rembrandt van Rijn",
        Museum = rijksMuseum,

        // he painted in several Genres
        Genres = new List() {goldenAge, portrets},
    });

    dbContext.SaveChanges();
}

TODO: see if you can remove a Museum that still has Artists and / or Genres
TODO: check that if you removed all Artists and all Genres from a Museum the Museum can be Removed.

Finally: are you sure that an Artist is only exhibited in one Museum? Is there only one Museum where I can see a Rembrandt?

Similarly: is a Genre only exhibited in one Museum, is there only one Museum that will show Impressionism?

Consider changing these relations to many-to-many. You'll probably won't even have to use the CascadeOnDelete anymore. Besides, if you feel naughty you will be able to destroy Museums that still have Artists in them ;-)

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  • Thanks for the reply. I'm going to play with this solution and report back. To answer some of your concerns: (1) I'm creating lists in the constructor bc that's what Julie Lerman did in the tutorial I was using ¯_(ツ)_/¯. I'm guessing it's useful to have an empty list instead of a null reference when I construct a Museum. (2) EFCore needs an explicit joining entity. Last thing: I'm confused by your suggestion of "removing the Museum from your DbContext" - is in not still there in your solution? – Andrew Boza Mar 8 '18 at 13:36
  • The only time you'll even have an empty list is when you plan to Add a new object. In that case just assign the List like I did in my examples. Besides: there are other ICollections that are not Lists. In your solution you'll have to copy all elements from the ICollection. If you just retrieved a Museum from the database, the retrieved Artists collection is also not a List – Harald Coppoolse Mar 8 '18 at 13:42
  • I'm just starting to implement your solution to see if it's going to work for me, and I'm curious as to why you chose to make the nav properties virtual. – Andrew Boza Mar 9 '18 at 14:12
  • Not all properties are virtual, only the ICollections are. This is mainly because it is entity framework convention. See [link] (entityframeworktutorial.net/code-first/…). If you follow the conventions, you don't need attributes nor fluent API to tell entity framework that you want a one-to-many or many-to-many. Entity Framework will create the correct foreign keys for you and the relations between the tables – Harald Coppoolse Mar 9 '18 at 14:28
  • That code-first convention is true for EF6, not so for EFCore yet. github.com/aspnet/EntityFrameworkCore/issues/1368 – Andrew Boza Mar 9 '18 at 16:27

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