4

I have a question about sorting String[] arrays using the Insertion Sort Algorithm in Java. I do realize that my question may very well be easier to complete using a different algorithm, but I am attempting to learn how everything works with this one first.

Basically, I am attempting to sort an array of strings using the algorithm. To do this, I compare char values from the array of strings so I am able to use standard > and == operators because comparing values this way (like you would with ints) is naturally very simple.

I have a solution I am working through where I sort an array of strings by the first 2 char values found at each array index, but I am starting to realize that what I have done is not a very robust solution because strings in an array can easily have values that are 'longer' than each other which would not make my sorting very accurate for longer strings with similar values.

With that in mind, can someone suggest (going along with the code I wrote below) how I would go about dynamically comparing char values created from various strings to sort the original string value?

So...

A: ...I don't run into NullPointer Exceptions comparing values from different sized strings

B: ...every char value is compared from the string, irregardless of size, so I can sort the original array of strings accurately)

public String[] sortArrayOfStrings(String[] array){
        //NOT COMPLETE, ONLY SORTS BASED ON FIRST & SECOND CHAR OF STRING INDEX
        //BASED ON INSERTION SORT ALGORITHM
        int length = array.length;

        String value;
        int index;

        for(int a = 1; a < length; a++){
            char currentCharValue = array[a].charAt(0);//USE '[a]' not '[index]'
            value = array[a];
            index = a;

            if(currentCharValue == array[a - 1].charAt(0) ){//IF FIRST CHAR == PREVIOUS
                while (index > 0 && array[index - 1].charAt(1) > array[index].charAt(1)){
                    array[index] = array[index - 1];
                    index = index - 1;
                }
            }else{

                while (index > 0 && array[index - 1].charAt(0) > currentCharValue){
                    array[index] = array[index - 1];
                    index = index - 1;
                }
            }
            array[index] = value;
        }

        return array;
}

Example array that works as expected because of 2 char check:

String[] arr = {"zz", "bb", "cb", "ba","za", "zb", "cz", "ab","aa"};

Example array that would fail to sort correctly because of extra chars:

String[] arr = {"bbz", "bba", "abz","abc"};

I know the above array fails to sort correctly because of the hardcoded 'check' of 2 chars, I am trying to remove the need to hardcode the check.

3 Answers 3

2

Try using the String.CompareTo(String s) method. It's a lot like the comparison operators that you have been using, except it will evaluate to an integer.

String str1 = "Cat";
String str2 = "Dog"; 

int sCompare = str1.CompareTo(str2);
  1. if sCompare == 0, then the Strings are the "same"
  2. if sCompare > 0, then str1 > str2 (alphabetically)
  3. if sCompare < 0, then str2 > str1 (alphabetically)

Edit:

For clarity, in the case of the above example, sCompare would evaluate to a negative value.

3
  • This is a very elegant, and likely more efficient solution to what I was doing @Chris. I asked a professor in my Masters program about this issue yesterday as well and he suggested the same compareTo solution. However, I am going to have to mark Damian's answer as correct because I was doing my best to stay away from the built-in String methods seeing as using chars allows me to create (I suppose) a secondary algorithm for turning strings to chars and comparing them. +1 though, if I could mark 2 correct answers I would.
    – ViaTech
    Mar 9, 2018 at 13:42
  • Just to add to my last comment to remove confusion (if there is any). I do realize charAt() is a String class method. I meant I was trying to stay away from the comparison methods found in the String class for learning purposes. I will go over the docs for compareTo to see how it is implemented though :)
    – ViaTech
    Mar 9, 2018 at 14:39
  • compareTo is a very common function in the Java Libraries, and is implemented differently for many different classes. In fact, you might serve yourself better in this research by looking at the Comparable interface (e.g. Class foo Implements Comparable). For example, how can you compare a monkey and an elephant: weight, hairyness, lifespan, etc..? In your code, where you are comparing strings, one character at a time, is probably not too different from how String.CompareTo() is actually coded. You are essentially re-inventing the wheel. Mar 9, 2018 at 14:47
1

If you really want to do it using chars comparsion the best way is to create separate method to compare these Strings.

Inside a isSmallerThan() while loop increments currentIndex until it's not out of bound for any argument and until chars are same. Then if statement check whether currentIndex got out of bounds for at least one string, it can happen for inputs like e.g.: (aaaaa, aa), (aaabb, aaa), (aaa, aaa). Then we must decide what is smaller by length comparsion.

For the case of insertion sort algorithm we do not care that (aaa, aaa) are the same Strings, we can just return that this is false and it'll interrupt a while loop inside sortArrayOfStrings method.

Else we know that chars are different and we simply compare them.

String[] sortArrayOfStrings(String[] array){
    int length = array.length;
    String value;
    int index;

    for(int a = 1; a < length; a++){
        value = array[a];
        index = a;
        while(index > 0 && isSmallerThan(value, array[index-1])) {
            array[index] = array[index - 1];
            --index;
        }
        array[index] = value;
    }
    return array;
}

boolean isSmallerThan(String left, String right) {
    int curIndex = 0;
    while (curIndex < left.length()
            && curIndex < right.length()
            && left.charAt(curIndex) == right.charAt(curIndex)){
        ++curIndex;
    }

    if (curIndex == left.length() || curIndex == right.length())
        return left.length() < right.length();
    else
        return left.charAt(curIndex) < right.charAt(curIndex);
}

But as people said before me it would be better to use compareTo or compareToIgnoreCase method from String library. To make this work just change isSmallerThan(value, array[index-1]) into array[index-1].compareToIgnoreCase(value) > 0.

2
  • Wonderful, this is the logic that was eluding me yesterday. Although you say this in your answer, I will note that @Chris's compareTo answer seems like a better solution over using chars (now that I think about it), but sorting based on char values is what I was after when I asked the question, so thanks!
    – ViaTech
    Mar 9, 2018 at 13:46
  • I wrote about compareTo() method at the end of my post. CompareTo method is pretty simple and important, so it's always good to at least basically understand it's logic, you had troubles with the logic so I decided to write the whole method code. You're welcome:) Mar 9, 2018 at 15:06
0

Using compareTo() method, implementation of insertion sort algorithm can look like this:

class InsertionSorter {

    public String[] sortArrayOfStrings(String[] array) {
        for (int i = 1; i < array.length; i++) {
            String element = array[i];
            int j;
            for (j = i - 1; j >= 0 && element.compareTo(array[j]) <= 0; j--)
                array[j + 1] = array[j];

            array[j + 1] = element;
        }
        return array;
    }
}

Example tests:

public class InsertionSorterTest {

    @Test
    public void shouldSortTwoLetterWords() {
        String[] arr = {"zz", "bb", "cb", "ba", "za", "zb", "cz", "ab", "aa"};
        String[] sortedArray = new InsertionSorter().sortArrayOfStrings(arr);
        Assert.assertEquals(sortedArray, new String[]{"aa", "ab", "ba", "bb", "cb", "cz", "za", "zb", "zz"});
    }

    @Test
    public void shouldSortLongerWords() {
        String[] arr = {"bbz", "bba", "abz", "abc"};
        String[] sortedArray = new InsertionSorter().sortArrayOfStrings(arr);
        Assert.assertEquals(sortedArray, new String[]{"abc", "abz", "bba", "bbz"});
    }
}

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