24

I accidentally typed git checkout in GIT CMD without any arguments in my working branch. The parent branch name is development. After I hit the command it showed the following:

M       analytics-engine/build.gradle
M       analytics-engine/src/main/groovy/com/oracle/emcsas/securityanalytics/stats/timebucket/ExternalizeTimeBucket.java
M       analytics-engine/src/main/groovy/com/oracle/emcsas/securityanalytics/stats/timebucket/TimeBucket.java

But I did not notice any changes in my local branch. All the changes are there. So what did it actually do.

git version 2.15.0.windows.1

3
  • A different but related question is this: What did you want it to do? Why did you execute it? Only to learn git? Or did you execute it in the hopes that it did something specific? Commented Mar 9, 2018 at 11:38
  • 1
    Have you read the documentation of git checkout? It is explained there: "You could omit <branch>, in which case the command degenerates to "check out the current branch", which is a glorified no-op with rather expensive side-effects to show only the tracking information, if exists, for the current branch."
    – axiac
    Commented Mar 9, 2018 at 11:39
  • Possible duplicate of What do git checkouts really mean? Commented Mar 9, 2018 at 11:52

2 Answers 2

19

The documentation says

git checkout <branch>

...

You could omit <branch>, in which case the command degenerates to "check out the current branch", which is a glorified no-op with rather expensive side-effects to show only the tracking information, if exists, for the current branch

3
  • 15
    what does it mean exactly by saying "with rather expensive side-effects" ?
    – koalaok
    Commented Sep 7, 2018 at 13:49
  • @koalaok A good example of bad documentation.
    – Naghi
    Commented May 20 at 14:19
  • ..., which mean it is a no-operation command; only shows the changes that are ready to commit, if any
    – Naghi
    Commented May 20 at 14:28
15

It shows you the current modified and not commited files in your current branch

6
  • If there is a tracking branch it equals git checkout -b <branch> --track <remote>/<branch> Commented Mar 9, 2018 at 11:37
  • @evolutionxbox - No, it doesn't, as is obvious if you try to explain what <branch> is in your supposedly-equivalent command, while remembering that the question is what happens when you don't supply a branch name. Commented Mar 9, 2018 at 14:26
  • @MarkAdelsberger I'm getting this information from the git docs. git-scm.com/docs/… - "If <branch> is not found but there does exist a tracking branch in exactly one remote (call it <remote>) with a matching name, treat as equivalent to [...]" Commented Mar 9, 2018 at 14:28
  • @evolutionxbox - Ok. So in your estimation, what is <branch> set to in the equivalent command, if I say git checkout with no further arguments? Commented Mar 9, 2018 at 14:37
  • Hmmm. Good point, I think I've read that part of the docs and assuming it's used when branch isn't there. It's not, only if the remote exists. Commented Mar 9, 2018 at 14:44

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