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I am converting from Eclipse CDT. The preprocessor macro feature is a must when navigating through C/C++ code with preprocessor defines (whether explicitly specified in Makefile or included through an external auto-generated header file). Without this, navigating the Linux source would be impossible, as described on this seminal wiki page on using Eclipse to study the Linux code. I am looking for an equivalent feature for VSC. Would appreciate a pointer.

w/ regards

6
  1. Install ms-vscode.cpptools extension.
  2. Open kernel source folder in VSCode.
  3. Follow the instructions, add "${workspaceFolder}/include" and "${workspaceFolder}/arch/{your arch}/include" to includePath, "your arch" is x86/arm etc.
  4. Wait for IntelliSence indexing.
1
  • I'm working with kernel and this answer worked like a charm. I notice that if you are working with modules development you can also use your machine's linux headers. In my case, added to settings.json : ` C_Cpp.default.includePath": ["/usr/src/linux-headers-5.0.0-custom-buster/arch/x86/include/" , "/usr/src/linux-headers-5.0.0-custom-buster/include/"] ` – fabatera Oct 15 '19 at 14:07
2

I did't need to add the arch folder (for x86_64 it was actually empty), but add some basic defines to make compiler specific types and macros visible to intellisense. My minimal config is shown below. For perfect results you would have to add all defines as configured in your kernel .config file (e.g. CONFIG_MMU). There are many of those, so typically you will only focus on the few you really care about.

{
    "configurations": [
        {
            "name": "Linux",
            "includePath": [
                "${workspaceFolder}/**",
                "${workspaceFolder}/include"
            ],
            "defines": [
                "__GNUC__",
                "__KERNEL__"
            ],
            "compilerPath": "/usr/bin/gcc",
            "cStandard": "c11",
            "cppStandard": "c++17",
            "intelliSenseMode": "clang-x64"
        }
    ],
    "version": 4
}
1
  • 1
    you would have to add all defines as configured in your kernel .config file All defines are already in include/generated/autoconf.h (under /usr/src/linux-headers-$(uname -r)/), should be enough to forceInclude it in c_cpp_properties.json. – Language Lawyer Mar 22 '19 at 4:45
0

As of today I have found the use of the vscode-linux-kernel project to be superior to both answers listed above, as navigation through the code and Intellisense works very well.

The project is released to the public domain.

0

This is what worked best for me (fixing some issue of the snippet in a previous answer):

{
    "configurations": [
        {
            "name": "Linux",
            "includePath": [
                "${workspaceFolder}/**",
                "${workspaceFolder}/include",
                "${workspaceFolder}/arch/<arch>/include" # replace <arch> with actual architecture to build
            ],
            "forcedInclude": [
                "${workspaceFolder}/BUILD/include/generated/autoconf.h"
            ],
            "defines": [
                "__KERNEL__"
            ],
            "compilerPath": "/usr/bin/gg", # replace this with your compiler (also gcc cross-compiler)
            "cStandard": "c11",
            "intelliSenseMode": "gcc-x64"
        }
    ],
    "version": 4
}

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