3

We have a solution in Delphi that calculates a travel's duration of a given vehicle, for example, 20 minutes, 25 minutes and so on. However, sometimes we have to antecipate the travel's start time, from a specific datetime, for example 09:00 to 08:40. Then, we need to substract a negative value from a TDateTime variable (travel's start), in this case, something like "-00:20". To do this, we multiply the datetime value by -1 (for example MyDiffDateTimeVariable * -1). The output we got is very strange, sometimes we obtain the exactly opposite behavior. In other case, an operation to extract 20 minutes results in a difference of two days from the original datetime.

Here is a sample console application that simulate our situation, with the current outputs, and what we will expected:

program DateTimeSample;

uses
  System.SysUtils, System.DateUtils;

var
  LDate1: TDateTime;
  LDate2: TDateTime;
begin
  LDate1 := IncMinute(0, 20);
  LDate2 := IncMinute(0, -20);
  WriteLn('Date1: ' + DateTimeToStr(LDate1));
  // Output = Date1: 30/12/1899 00:20:00 [OK]
  WriteLn('Date2: ' + DateTimeToStr(LDate2));
  // Output = Date2: 29/12/1899 23:40:00 [OK]
  WriteLn('-----');
  WriteLn('Date1: ' + DateTimeToStr(LDate1 * -1));
  // Output = Date1: 30/12/1899 00:20:00 [Expected 29/12/1899 23:40:00]
  WriteLn('Date2: ' + DateTimeToStr(LDate2 * -1));
  // Output = Date2: 31/12/1899 23:40:00 [Expected 30/12/1899 00:20:00]
  ReadLn;
end.
  • 1
    From the help: "TDateTime supports negative values too. The negative spectrum mirrors the positive one exactly. As such, a value of Now (positive) is exactly the same as its negative value--Now. You should use negative TDateTime values with care. Incorrect use of negative values can lead to various problems." – Brian Mar 9 '18 at 20:51
  • 3
    Do not operate on TDateTime numerically. Use the SysUtils and DateUtils helper functions. – LU RD Mar 9 '18 at 21:00
  • Delphi version is important here. On D2009: IncMinute(0, 20) evaluates to -0.013889 (as Double), which is peculiar, but produces the correct date-time value 1899-12-30 00:20:00 (probably due to "no TDateTime values from -1 through 0" so time portion simply applied to zero-date). On the other hand IncMinute(0, -20) evaluates to 0.013889 (as Double), which produces the date-time value 1899-12-30 00:20:00, which is simply wrong. – Disillusioned Mar 9 '18 at 23:40
  • As a consequence of the above issue in D2009: IncDay(IncMinute(EncodeDate(1899, 12, 30), 20)) evaluates to 1899-12-30 23:40:00 whereas it should be 1899-12-31 00:20:00. – Disillusioned Mar 10 '18 at 0:00
  • @LURD Indeed! I used to think at least Date + NumberOfDays was safe (habit from before the existence of DateUtils.pas). However, luckily I haven't worked with dates older than 1899-12-30, because the rule "There are no TDateTime values from –1 through 0" means my assumption would have caused off-by-one errors. – Disillusioned Mar 10 '18 at 0:08
3

Karel's answer explains what's happening. Basically, TDateTime is represented as a Double, but that doesn't mean you can work with it in the same way as you normally would a Double value. It's internal structure carries particular semantics that if you don't handle them correctly, you're bound to get some peculiar behaviour.

The key mistake you're making is in taking the negative of a date-time value. This concept doesn't really make sense. Not even if you look at dates in BC, because the calendar system has changed a number of times over the years.

This is the main reason you should favour library routines that deal with the nuances of the internal structure (whatever your platform). In Delphi that means you should use the SysUtils and DateUtils routines for working with dates and times.

You seem to be trying to hold duration as a TDateTime value. You'd be much better off determining your preferred unit of measure and using Integer (perhaps Int64) or Double (if you need support for fractions of a unit). Then you can add or subtract, preferably using library routines, the duration from your start or end times.

The following code demonstrates some examples.

var
  LStartTime, LEndTime: TDateTime;
  LDuration_Mins: Integer;
begin
  { Init sample values for each calculation }
  LStartTime := EncodeDateTime(2018, 3, 9, 8, 40, 0, 0);
  LEndTime := EncodeDateTime(2018, 3, 9, 9, 0, 0, 0);
  LDuration_Mins := 20;

  { Output result of each calculation }
  Writeln(Format('Whole Duration: %d', [MinutesBetween(LStartTime, LEndTime)]));
  Writeln(Format('Frac Duration: %.6f', [MinuteSpan(LStartTime, LEndTime)]));
  Writeln(Format('Start Time: %s', [FormatDateTime('yyyy-mm-dd hh:nn:ss', IncMinute(LEndTime, -LDuration_Mins))]));
  Writeln(Format('End Time: %s', [FormatDateTime('yyyy-mm-dd hh:nn:ss', IncMinute(LStartTime, LDuration_Mins))]));
end;

Additional Considerations

You said you're dealing with vehicle travel times. If you're dealing with long-haul travel you might have some other things to think about.

  • Daylight saving: If a vehicle starts its journey shortly before DST changes and ends after, you need to take this into account when calculating a missing value. Perhaps easiest would be to convert date-time values to UTC for the calculation. Which leads to...
  • Time zone changes: Again, unless your code is time-zone aware you're bound to make mistakes.
2

When you inspect the value casted to double, you can see: double(LDate1) = 0.0138888888888889 double(LDate2) = -1.98611111111111

Seems like a bug to me, because with today it returns: double(LDate1) = 43168,0138888889 double(LDate2) = 43167,9861111111

Edit: Hmm, according the documentation, it is not a bug, it is a feature :-)

When working with negative TDateTime values, computations must handle time portion separately. The fractional part reflects the fraction of a 24-hour day without regard to the sign of the TDateTime value. For example, 6:00 A.M. on December 29, 1899 is –1.25, not –1 + 0.25, which would equal –0.75. There are no TDateTime values from –1 through 0.

0

Compiler always appears to treat TDateTime as positive when doing numerical operations on it. Try this:

uses
  System.SysUtils, System.DateUtils;

function InvertDate(ADateTime: TDateTime): TDateTime;
var
  LMsec: Int64;
begin
  LMsec := MillisecondsBetween(ADateTime, 0); //Always Positive
  if ADateTime > 0 then
    LMsec := 0 - LMsec;
  Result := IncMillisecond(0, LMsec);
end;

var
  LDate1: TDateTime;
  LDate1Negative: TDateTime;
  LDate2: TDateTime;

begin
  try
    LDate1 := IncMinute(0, 20);
    LDate2 := IncMinute(0, -20);
    WriteLn('Date1: ' + DateTimeToStr(LDate1));
    // Output = Date1: 30/12/1899 00:20:00 [OK]
    WriteLn('Date2: ' + DateTimeToStr(LDate2));
    // Output = Date2: 29/12/1899 23:40:00 [OK]
    WriteLn('-----');

    WriteLn('Date1: ' + DateTimeToStr( InvertDate(LDate1) ));
    // Output = Date1: Expected 29/12/1899 23:40:00
    WriteLn('Date2: ' + DateTimeToStr( InvertDate(LDate2) ));
    // Output = Date2: 30/12/1899 00:20:00
    ReadLn;
  except
    on E: Exception do
      Writeln(E.ClassName, ': ', E.Message);
  end;
end.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.