-1

I tried to get a full list of all the files in a folder like this:

#include<Windows.h>
#include<iostream>
#include<stdio.h>

using namespace std;

void main()
{
HANDLE dateiHandle;
WIN32_FIND_DATA wfindD;

dateiHandle = FindFirstFile(L"E:\\Roman\\PIC\\funpics\\*", &wfindD);
do
{
    cout << wfindD.cFileName << endl;
} while (FindNextFile(dateiHandle, &wfindD));

FindClose(dateiHandle);
while (1)
{

}
}

and I can't figure out why the results are like this:

00AFFCCC
00AFFCCC
00AFFCCC
00AFFCCC
00AFFCCC
00AFFCCC
00AFFCCC
00AFFCCC
00AFFCCC
00AFFCCC
00AFFCCC
00AFFCCC
00AFFCCC
00AFFCCC
00AFFCCC

marked as duplicate by Raymond Chen, IInspectable, Jonathan Potter c++ Mar 10 '18 at 7:50

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • Even if the names were hex codes because of some bug, they would not be the same for every filename. The API is usually not the problem... – Anders Mar 10 '18 at 3:18
  • Running this code under a debugger would have given away the type of wfindD.cFileName immediately. And while there is no overload for operator<<(std::basic_ostream) for the type of wfindD.cFileName, it should be obvious, that it will not interpret the data pointed to, but print the pointer value. Downvoted for all the right reasons. – IInspectable Mar 10 '18 at 3:46
  • The dupes are not so good (wcout won't display non-ASCII characters in the console without further ado). Here is a better one. – zett42 Mar 10 '18 at 9:37
7

TCHAR will be typedefed to wchar_t if you have unicode support enabled in your project (the default recent versions of Visual Studio). std::cout doesn't have any special handling for a wchar_t* and falls back on the void* overload for operator<<, which just prints the memory address pointed to as a hex number. Use std::wcout instead, which does have an operator<< overload for wchar_t*, and will print the strings like you expect.

As a side note, you'll have fewer surprises if you always explicitly use the A (for ANSI) or W (for wide) names for Win32 functions and structures that handle strings. To support non-ascii strings, you're generally better off using the W versions. In this case, FindFirstFileW, FindNextFileW, and WIN32_FIND_DATAW. FindClose doesn't directly interact with strings, so there's no A or W version of it.

  • Unicode is the default in projects created using the New Project wizard only in recent versions of Visual Studio (I believe since VS 2015, or maybe VS 2012). Dev-C++ or Code::Blocks default to ANSI encoding, to this day. So no, Unicode is not the default, as you put it. Although it should be, and should have been for almost 2 decades. – IInspectable Mar 10 '18 at 3:27
  • @IInspectable Unicode is the default in VS2010, and that's the oldest I have installed at the moment to check. I suppose it's true that I shouldn't assume Windows == Visual Studio though. – Miles Budnek Mar 10 '18 at 5:47
  • _TCHAR, _tmain, FindFirstFileA, etc was to support building applications for the low-end/low-requirements branch of Windows (Windows 95 through Me) in addition to the normal branch (Windows NT 4 through 10). That should be just trivia since that branch died 2001-2006. But, unfortunately, TCHAR is still around in the MSVC toolset. You don't need it. – Tom Blodget Mar 10 '18 at 18:45
1

Use std::wcout instead of std::cout and you'll see the correct names printed out. 1

Your app is compiled for Unicode, so you're really calling FindFirstFileW(), which modifies a WIN32_FIND_DATAW structure, whose cFileName member is type WCHAR[], which is a double-byte "wide" character string.

1 Although, if the file names really do have double-byte characters (over 255), such as Japanese, then you may need to tweak other settings in your Command Prompt to actually see the double-byte characters correctly.

  • wcout operates on wchar_t. wchar_t on Windows means UTF-16. All code points are encoded using at least 2 bytes in UTF-16. You are confusing code points and code units, and I don't even know, what you mean by "double-byte characters (over 255)". That doesn't make any sense. Besides, the console is very much capable of displaying UTF-16, so no other tweaks or settings are required. This contribution is not helpful. – IInspectable Mar 10 '18 at 3:33
  • @IInspectable Not so much. Getting the windows console to print anything other than ASCII text is a chore. – Miles Budnek Mar 10 '18 at 6:32
  • @MilesBudnek: The Windows Console is perfectly capable of displaying any Unicode code point. The chore of which you speak is getting the C++ I/O Stream library to cooperate. The console has no issues, assuming a font with appropriate glyphs is installed. The default console font (Lucida Console) supports the entire BMP, that clearly contains loads of characters that aren't ASCII characters. – IInspectable Mar 10 '18 at 12:40
  • "double-byte" is not normally used in relation to any Unicode encoding, even UCS-2. – Tom Blodget Mar 10 '18 at 18:43
  • Would you be happy if I said "wchar_t values over 255"? Also, on my Windows 10 system, the default font for the Command Prompt is Consolas, and the default encoding is code page 437. So Japanese just looks like question marks, Yes, if you use a font that supports most of the UCS-2 range, and the correct code page, you can get Japanese to show up, but as you say, that's an assumption. So my point that you MAY need to tweak some settings is not wrong. Beginners especially tend to be tripped up by this, so I think it's more helpful to give them a heads up about it than to lecture me. – Dan Korn Mar 12 '18 at 16:38

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