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Why does this code print "greater than 0"?

int main()
{
  unsigned int a = 5;
  int b = -10;
  (a + b) > 0 ? printf("greater than 0") : printf("less than 0");
}

If I do:

printf("%d\n", a + b);

...it prints:

-5 
2
  • 2
    Integer promotion rules. – David C. Rankin Mar 10 '18 at 0:37
  • 4
    printf("%d\n", a + b); actually has undefined behavior. The result of a + b is of type unsigned int, but "%d" requires an argument of type int. It's OK if the value is within the range of but types, but that's not the case here. – Keith Thompson Mar 10 '18 at 0:42
3

Whenever you do any operation in C, the arguments are converted according to the "Usual arithemetic conversions" rules (section 6.3.1.8 of the spec). There are lots of them, but for the purposes of this example, the important one is:

the integer promotions are performed on both operands. Then the following rules are applied to the promoted operands:
If both operands have the same type, then no further conversion is needed.
Otherwise, if both operands have signed integer types or both have unsigned integer types, the operand with the type of lesser integer conversion rank is converted to the type of the operand with greater rank.
Otherwise, if the operand that has unsigned integer type has rank greater or equal to the rank of the type of the other operand, then the operand with signed integer type is converted to the type of the operand with unsigned integer type.

int and unsigned int have the same coversion rank, so whenever you do an operation on an int and an unsigned int, the int will be converted to unsigned.

In you case, that causes the value of b (-10) to become a very large number. You then add 5 to it, which is still very large (but not large enough to wrap around back to zero), so the result of > is true.

4
  • You might want to explain the UB too. – Deduplicator Mar 10 '18 at 0:48
  • 1
    The actual value of -10 when converted to unsigned is equal to UINT_MAX - 9 where UINT_MAX is available in <limits.h> and represents the maximum (implementation-defined) value that an unsigned can represent. Also, the reason a + b gives a positive value is not related to wrapping - it is because it has an unsigned result which can never be negative. – Peter Mar 10 '18 at 0:59
  • @Peter -- while an unsigned value will never be negative, it might be zero, so the comparison can't be ignored for type reasons -- it still has to be performed (perhaps at compile time as a constant fold, as all the operands here are constants). – Chris Dodd Mar 10 '18 at 19:30
  • @ChrisDodd - I didn't suggest otherwise. The OP was clearly expecting an output of "less than 0" given the inputs. The inputs would not produce a zero result under any circumstances. – Peter Mar 11 '18 at 8:46
1

6.3.1.1 Boolean, characters, and integers and 6.3.1.8 Usual arithmetic conversions (thanks Chris)

If an int can represent all values of the original type (as restricted by the width, for a bit-field), the value is converted to an int; otherwise, it is converted to an unsigned int. These are called the integer promotions.58) All other types are unchanged by the integer promotions.

and

...if the operand that has unsigned integer type has rank greater or equal to the rank of the type of the other operand, then the operand with signed integer type is converted to the type of the operand with unsigned integer type.

You addition involves an unsigned and an int, int cannot represent all values of unsigned, so the value is converted to an unsigned int.

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Your problem

By default, your int gets promoted to an unsigned int, according to the usual arithmetic conversions:

[...] if the operand that has unsigned integer type has rank greater or equal to the rank of the type of the other operand, then the operand with signed integer type is converted to the type of the operand with unsigned integer type.

Solution

You need to cast a to int for this ternary to work as you expect:

((int)a + b) > 0 ? printf("greater than 0") : printf("less than 0");
-1

In your print statement, you are converting a and b to their signed int representation before you add them together. You are not doing so for your conditional.

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